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The Neon Demon Trailer


The Neon Demon follows the journey of its protagonist Jesse (Elle Fanning) when she makes the move to Los Angeles as an aspiring model. Jesse is a young female that has been recruited by a fashion designer, as the typical girl from a small town with big dreams who wants to make it big in the modelling industry. However Jesse is not your typical model as she is described as a dangerous girl in the sense that the narrative soon takes a sinister turn. 

Continue: The Neon Demon Trailer

Batman V Superman: Dawn Of Justice Trailer


Every superhero has a dark side and being 100% human, Batman is in doubt over how genuine Superman actually is. After all, Superman is from a different planet and has incredibly natural powers; powers that could easily destroy our world.

As Lex Luther manipulates Batman and Superman into a deeper and deeper war, the duo find that they are pitted against a force that's much more of a present threat than either of the heroes. They are joined by a number of other heroes (including Wonder Woman and The Flash) on a quest to save earth from immediate danger.

Warner Bros. Pictures releases Batman V Superman: Dawn Of Justice in cinemas 25 March 2016.

Batman V Superman: Dawn Of Justice - Official Trailer


What happens when two superheroes with vastly differing opinions come head to head? Well, not very well if Lex Luthor has anything to do with it. Superman believes Batman is a vigilante and the civil liberties of the people of Gotham are 'being trampled on' whilst Batman feels Superman's abilities are blown out of proportion by the media and is far from a fan of his superhero outfit.

Lex Luthor has enough power to manipulate this situation to his benefit and pitches both heroes against one another - Son of Krypton versus Bat of Gotham however, when his plan doesn't go exactly to plan he creates a monster to destroy both men - on the verge of destruction, Batman and Superman are joined by Wonder Woman, Aquaman and other superheroes on their quest to save their city from destruction.

Batman V Superman: Dawn Of Justice is directed by Zack Snyder and it's a precursor to The Justice League films - which are also written and directed by Snyder.

Jena Malone - 65th Berlin International Film Festival (Berlinale) - 'Nobody Wants the Night' - Arrivals at Berlinale Palast - Berlin, Germany - Thursday 5th February 2015

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Jena Malone - A variety of stars were snapped as they arrived for the Art of Elysium's 8th Annual Heaven Gala held which was held at Hangar 8 in Los Angeles, California, United States - Saturday 10th January 2015

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Jena Malone - A variety of stars were snapped as they arrived for the Art of Elysium's 8th Annual Heaven Gala held which was held at Hangar 8 in Los Angeles, California, United States - Sunday 11th January 2015

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Jena Malone - Inherent Vice LA Premiere at TCL Chinese Theater - Los Angeles, California, United States - Wednesday 10th December 2014

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Benicio Del Toro, Jena Malone, Joanna Newsom, Maya Rudolph, Sasha Pieterse, Jordan Christian Hearn, Reese Witherspoon and Joaquin Phoenix - Los Angeles premiere of 'Inherent Vice' - Arrivals at TCL Chinese Theatre - Hollywood, California, United States - Wednesday 10th December 2014

Benicio Del Toro, Jena Malone, Joanna Newsom, Maya Rudolph, Sasha Pieterse, Jordan Christian Hearn, Reese Witherspoon and Joaquin Phoenix
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Benicio Del Toro
Benicio Del Toro, Jena Malone, Joanna Newsom, Maya Rudolph, Sasha Pieterse, Jordan Christian Hearn, Reese Witherspoon and Joaquin Phoenix
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Benicio Del Toro

Shots of American actress and musician Jena Malone wearing a net mini dress as she goes shopping at the Grove in Hollywood, Los Angeles, California, United States - Monday 1st December 2014

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Jena Malone - 'The Hunger Games: Mockingjay - Part 1' Los Angeles premiere at Nokia Theatre - Arrivals - Los Angeles, California, United States - Monday 17th November 2014

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Jena Malone - "The Hunger Games: Mockingjay - Part 1" Los Angeles Premiere held at the Nokia Theatre L.A. Live - Los Angeles, California, United States - Tuesday 18th November 2014

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Jena Malone - Premiere of The Hunger Games Mockingjay Part One - Los Angeles, California, United States - Tuesday 18th November 2014

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Jena Malone - "The Hunger Games: Mockingjay - Part 1" Los Angeles Premiere held at the Nokia Theatre L.A. Live at Nokia Theatre L.A. Live - Los Angeles, California, United States - Monday 17th November 2014

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Jena Malone - Los Angeles Premiere of 'The Hunger Games: Mockingjay - Part 1' at Nokia Theatre L.A. Live - Arrivals at Nokia Theatre - Los Angeles, California, United States - Monday 17th November 2014

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Jena Malone - World premiere of 'The Hunger Games: Mockingjay - Part 1' - Arrivals - London, United Kingdom - Monday 10th November 2014

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Jena Malone - Celebrities leaving the Corinthia Hotel London to attend The Hunger Games premiere - London, United Kingdom - Monday 10th November 2014

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Jena Malone - The Hunger Games: Mockingjay Part 1 World Premiere - Arrivals - London, United Kingdom - Monday 10th November 2014

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Jena Malone - Jena Malone leaves a hotel in London - London, United Kingdom - Monday 10th November 2014

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Jena Malone - 'The Hunger Games: Mockingjay, Part 1' world premiere held at the Odeon Leicester Square - Arrivals at Odeon Leicester Square - London, United Kingdom - Monday 10th November 2014

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Jena Malone - A variety if A-Listers from the music industry were photographed as they arrived at the MTV European Music Awards 2014 which was held at the The Hydro arena in Glasgow, Scotland, United Kingdom - Sunday 9th November 2014

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Jena Malone - AFI Film Festival - Young Hollywood Round Table - Arrivals at TCL Chinese 6 Theaters - Los Angeles, California, United States - Saturday 8th November 2014

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The Hunger Games: Mockingjay, Part 1 Trailer


With the incredible ramifications of the end of the yearly ritualistic sacrificial televised Hunger Games, the world is thrown into disarray when the supposed saviour of the underprivileged working class travels to District 13 to help with the revolution she inadvertently started. Katniss Everdeen (Jennifer Lawrence) is the last hope and symbol of resistance against the capitol that seeks to keep her and her people as poverty-stricken slaves, and after surviving the aforementioned Hunger Games twice,  Katniss must learn that 'it is the things we love most that destroy us.' Now, with an army at her back, Katniss must change the course of history and bring freedom to the masses through a global armed revolution.

Continue: The Hunger Games: Mockingjay, Part 1 Trailer

Video - Josh Brolin And Benicio Del Toro Greet Each Other At The New York Film Festival Premiere Of 'Inherent Vice' - Part 1


Stars of forthcoming crime comedy 'Inherent Vice' Benicio Del Toro and Josh Brolin were among the guest arrivals at the movie's premiere held during the 52nd New York Film Festival. The movie follows a detective forced to take on a case more personal in nature than he's used to.

Continue: Video - Josh Brolin And Benicio Del Toro Greet Each Other At The New York Film Festival Premiere Of 'Inherent Vice' - Part 1

Jena Malone - Many stars attended and were photographed at the 52nd New York Film Festival in New York, United States - Saturday 4th October 2014

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Jena Malone - Many stars attended and were photographed at the 52nd New York Film Festival in New York, United States - Sunday 5th October 2014

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The Hunger Games: Mockingjay, Part 1 Trailer


President Snow has a message for the people of Panem in a mock propaganda clip and the first The Hunger Games: Mockingjay teaser. Appearing dressed in white and sitting on a white throne in a white room, Snow addresses the citizens of Panem with a message. "Since the dark days, our nation has known only peace," he begins.

"Your hard work feeds us and in return we feed and protect you," Snow continues. "But if you resist the system you starve yourself. If you fight against it, it is you who will bleed." The camera pans out and we see sweet Peeta standing blank-faced next to the President.

In the movie, Katniss Everdeen (Jennifer Lawrence) is living in District 13 after bringing down The Hunger Games. Under the leadership of President Coin (Julianne Moore), Katniss embarks on a quest to save her beloved friend Peeta (Josh Hutcherson) and the nation.

Continue: The Hunger Games: Mockingjay, Part 1 Trailer

The Messenger Review


Excellent
Another dark, gloomy drama about home life during wartime, this film features some seriously great performances and a theme that will resonate powerfully with thoughtful audiences.

Will (Foster) is just out of military hospital after being injured while serving in Iraq; his relationship with his girlfriend (Malone) is strained, and he's not happy about his new assignment informing families about the deaths of loved ones in the warzone. His mentor for the job is the jaded Tony (Harrelson), who survives by maintaining his distance from the families: "Don't touch the NOK" (next of kin), he tells Will. But Will can't help but reach out to them, and one widow (Morton) makes a particularly strong impression on him.

Continue reading: The Messenger Review

Sucker Punch Review


Bad
There are so many layers of fantasy in this eye-catching filmbut we never see any real humanity. This sucks all tension and emotion from what should be a provocative thriller. Although 12-year-old boys will probably love it.

After her mother dies, Babydoll (Browning) is sent to a gothic madhouse where a sinister orderly (Isaac) arranges, behind the back of the head doctor (Gugino), to have her lobotomised when the specialist (Hamm) arrives in five days.With less than a week to escape, she hatches a fantastical plan involving four fellow inmates (Cornish, Malone, Hudgens and Chung). They fantasise that they're on dangerous missions led by a mysterious man (Glenn), gathering the items they need to break out.

Continue reading: Sucker Punch Review

Sucker Punch Trailer


Zack Snyder has described his latest film Sucker Punch as Alice in Wonderland with machine guns. Set in the 1950s it tells the story of a girl named Baby Doll who's been incarcerated in a mental institution and faces having a lobotomy.

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The Messenger Trailer


Watch the trailer for The Messenger

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The Go-Getter Review


Very Good
Unless you're a Star Wars nerd, you've probably never set eyes on Martin Hynes. Nine years ago, Hynes played a young George Lucas in George Lucas in Love, a smart comedy short that offered the supposition that the grand lord of geekdom got his inspiration for the classic trilogy from classmates at a Los Angeles college. Since its release, it has garnered a cult classic status while its director went on to direct limp teen comedies Sleepover and Sydney White. As for Hynes, he became a screenwriter for several unrealized properties and ended up writing the first draft of Stealing Harvard, the thankfully-forgotten Tom Green comedy.

Six years after his Harvard cred, Hynes seems to have returned to more fertile and vital ground with The Go-Getter, his second full-length film and a minor hit at the 2007 Sundance Film Festival. Hynes, who also wrote the film, never shows up on screen but the nerdy impresario he embodied years ago can be seen in the guise of Mercer White (Lou Taylor Pucci), a high-school dropout who takes to the road with a stolen car not long after his mother's death. Initially, Mercer's voyage has two goals: to find and inform his half-brother Arlen (Jsu Garcia) of their mother's death, and to get all sweaty-like with Joely (Jena Malone), a thong-sporting, middle-school crush of Mercer's.

Continue reading: The Go-Getter Review

The Ruins Review


Very Good
Watch out, Martha Stewart! Not even your garden tools can stop the predators in The Ruins, a Hollywood adaptation of Scott Smith's novel. They aren't mummies, pharaohs, or cannibalistic tribesman, but killer flowers: They may seem innocent, but when reaching out to touch them, watch out for razor-sharp teeth and toxic venom.

No, this isn't a comedy like Little Shop of Horrors, but a shocking and disturbing experience that slaughters any comedic notions audiences may have after realizing they're watching a movie about killer flowers. Does the sight of a girl cutting herself open and pulling plants from her wounds make you cringe? Then prepare for one of the most unsettling horror films of the year.

Continue reading: The Ruins Review

Into The Wild Review


Very Good
One day, you just pack up your essentials in a backpack, do away with all forms of identification, and set off on the road to find that piece of blue sky that's been missing from your puzzle. Such is the task taken on by young Chris McCandless (Emile Hirsch) when he set out in the summer of 1990 hoping to reach the blustery ether of Alaska. Abandoning a life of charm, money, and an equally rebellious sister (Jena Malone), McCandless walked, hitched, and explored America for two years before he died from starvation and partial poisoning on the outskirts of Denali National Park in Alaska.

Four years later, Outside magazine contributor Jon Krakauer documented McCandless' travels in his debut novel Into the Wild, which serves as a blueprint for Sean Penn's adaptation of McCandless' life. Look at me cross-eyed all you want but this tale of "a rebellious 1990s Thoreau" (as the press notes ponder he might be) brings out a buoyancy in director and terminal humbug Penn that's been absent in his filmography thus far. One might think Penn would be more apt to adapt Krakauer's recent Under the Banner of Heaven instead, but his direction in Wild is astute and brisk though not always as concise as one would hope.

Continue reading: Into The Wild Review

Pride & Prejudice (2005) Review


Very Good
English students of the world rejoice - another reason not to read Jane Austen. Joe Wright's latest incarnation of Austen's classic Pride & Prejudice is a mostly blissful time-traveling bus tour through a giggly and gorgeous English countryside. To your left note the lovely ladies Bennet, all sideways glances, blushing cheeks and innuendo. To your right, lenses at the ready for the dapper, tall, dark, and handsome objects of their affection, Darcy, Bingley, and Wickham! Swoon... Watch them as they play and woo, mismanage and miscarry, repress and reveal. This flighty matrimonial preamble is the pleasure of Wright's adaptation, briskly played in balls and manors. When at its playful best, it dances lightly with humor and delight. However, the film's occasional missteps, rhythm-less moves into the shadows of darker and more serious emotional territory, threaten to sink rather than anchor Wright's film with any of the depth they intend to provide.

For those who are unaware of Austen's novel (it might be helpful to consider that The Lion King is to Hamlet as Bridget Jones' Diary is to Pride & Prejudice), Pride & Prejudice is the story of the Bennet sisters, and particularly, second eldest child Elizabeth (Keira Knightley). These desperate housewives-to-be are in dire pursuit of a man. For the younger girls, and Elizabeth's squawking mother (a superbly erratic Brenda Blethyn), a man's greatest endowment is his wallet. However, for Elizabeth and oldest sister Jane (Rosamund Pike) love is the only currency in which they wish to deal. Convenient then that the objects of their affections, Mr. Bingley (Simon Woods) for Jane, and the infamously standoffish Mr. Darcy (Matthew MacFadyen) for Elizabeth, are moneyed up to the kilt when they ride into town to stir trouble and steal hearts. Elizabeth's very cinematic blindness to Darcy's very British advance is the centerpiece of both novel and film, with all suspense drawn from the "will they or won't they" dilemma.

Continue reading: Pride & Prejudice (2005) Review

Pride & Prejudice Review


Very Good
English students of the world rejoice - another reason not to read Jane Austen. Joe Wright's latest incarnation of Austen's classic Pride & Prejudice is a mostly blissful time-traveling bus tour through a giggly and gorgeous English countryside. To your left note the lovely ladies Bennet, all sideways glances, blushing cheeks and innuendo. To your right, lenses at the ready for the dapper, tall, dark, and handsome objects of their affection, Darcy, Bingley, and Wickham! Swoon... Watch them as they play and woo, mismanage and miscarry, repress and reveal. This flighty matrimonial preamble is the pleasure of Wright's adaptation, briskly played in balls and manors. When at its playful best, it dances lightly with humor and delight. However, the film's occasional missteps, rhythm-less moves into the shadows of darker and more serious emotional territory, threaten to sink rather than anchor Wright's film with any of the depth they intend to provide.

For those who are unaware of Austen's novel (it might be helpful to consider that The Lion King is to Hamlet as Bridget Jones' Diary is to Pride & Prejudice), Pride & Prejudice is the story of the Bennet sisters, and particularly, second eldest child Elizabeth (Keira Knightley). These desperate housewives-to-be are in dire pursuit of a man. For the younger girls, and Elizabeth's squawking mother (a superbly erratic Brenda Blethyn), a man's greatest endowment is his wallet. However, for Elizabeth and oldest sister Jane (Rosamund Pike) love is the only currency in which they wish to deal. Convenient then that the objects of their affections, Mr. Bingley (Simon Woods) for Jane, and the infamously standoffish Mr. Darcy (Matthew MacFadyen) for Elizabeth, are moneyed up to the kilt when they ride into town to stir trouble and steal hearts. Elizabeth's very cinematic blindness to Darcy's very British advance is the centerpiece of both novel and film, with all suspense drawn from the "will they or won't they" dilemma.

Continue reading: Pride & Prejudice Review

Saved! Review


Good
Saved! is just the cutest little Christian comedy, simply the sweetest wee satire you'll ever see - but this is a sugar cookie leaking arsenic. Seemingly just another teen movie, Saved! goes into cinematically uncharted territory right off the bat as the teenage narrator, Mary (Jena Malone), says "I've been born again my whole life." We then get her story of how she, as a born-again Christian, couldn't accept that her boyfriend, Dean (Chad Faust), was gay as he claimed. Deciding that it was God's will, Mary seduces Dean, whose parents send him to a gay deprogramming clinic, while Mary is left pregnant.

This is all just prelude to a by-the-numbers story wherein Mary, a member of the coolest clique at American Eagle Christian High - the Christian Jewels, who have a band and their own pendants - gets booted from paradise by the clique's leader, Hilary Faye (Mandy Moore), as tan as she is vicious, after Mary starts questioning their judgmental attitudes. Fortunately, there's a pair of rebels to cushion Mary's fall: Hilary Faye's wheelchair-bound brother and a secret non-Christian, Roland (Macauley Culkin), and his girlfriend, the school's "only Jewish," Cassandra (Eva Amurri). While Culkin's sly, sleepy asides provide some of Saved!'s better moments, Amurri is just as much a shambling, bug-eyed, and hyperactive mess as she was in The Banger Sisters (if it's not overacting, it ain't acting, apparently). Mary has to hide her pregnancy from the school's eagle-eyed Biblethumpers, enduring Hilary Faye's hypocritical assaults, and hoping that the cute missionary skater and pastor's kid Patrick (Patrick Fugit) will ask her to prom. Will Mary keep the baby? Will Hilary Faye be allowed to be such a bitch? What would Jesus do? And will there be a shopping montage?

Continue reading: Saved! Review

Contact Review


Very Good
Apparently, we are not alone. And we're beaming The Spice Girls into space.

But seriously, Carl Sagan's ode to the superior intelligence of aliens (and how us darned humans mess everything up) is consistently beautiful and interesting, but it never makes a point (except for that bit about the darned humans). The plot, which gives Jodie Foster schematics from space and focuses on the technical and bureaucratic minutiae that go into the construction of an extradimensional travelling device, is rather on the nose -- and the only real surprises in the film come from its obsession with God (in which the late Sagan did not believe) and the complete and utter disappointment received with the aliens are finally revealed.

Continue reading: Contact Review

The Dangerous Lives Of Altar Boys Review


Very Good
I'll forego my opportunity to cleverly riff on the film's title, as I'm sure many will have a field day doing in light of current world events. Director Peter Care's (best known for his work on music videos and commercials) debut feature The Dangerous Lives of Altar Boys, based on the 1994 novel by late author Chris Fuhrman, is a film about children made primarily for an adult audience. It's a thoughtful meditation on the thrills and difficulties that come with being a fourteen year old in a world where every older, authority figure seems to be oppressive, apathetic, or both. Combine Care's compassion for his characters and methodical pacing with a number of crazed, Todd McFarlane-created animated sequences, and what results is a unique telling of a structurally traditional, coming-of-age story.

Set in the 1970's, Francis (Emile Hirsch) and Tim (Kieran Culkin) are two irreverent, trouble-making friends who attend the same Catholic high school. Their archenemy is Sister Assumpta (Jodie Foster), an immensely strict nun, who rules the school with an iron fist. Seeking a more even playing field, Tim and the artistically gifted Francis, with the help of a few friends, create a comic book where their superhero alter egos do battle with the evil forces of Sister Assumpta.

Continue reading: The Dangerous Lives Of Altar Boys Review

Howl's Moving Castle Review


Very Good
Similar to Princess Mononoke and Spirited Away, Hayao Miyazaki's Howl's Moving Castle is a sumptuously illustrated fairy tale with a pro-environment and anti-war slant, though unlike those modern classics, the animé titan's latest suffers from a narrative confusion that bogs down its initially effervescent spirit. A gloriously animated fantasia blessed by familiar Miyazaki hallmarks - vibrant, ethereal artwork, whimsical creatures, a rural world in which mysticism and technology happily coexist - the film (being released in both subtitled and dubbed versions, the latter of which I saw) has a light aura of juvenile romanticism and a manic, tangible physicality that stands head and shoulders above anything previously crafted by the maestros at Japan's legendary Studio Ghibli (including Katsuhiro Otomo's recent Steamboy).

The story of a young girl who, after being changed into an elderly woman by an evil witch, joins forces with a petulant playboy wizard against a nefarious sorcerer, Howl's is akin to a cluttered, cacophonous childhood dream come to life. However, as with dreams, Miyazaki's film is also far-too-often a bewildering jumble of intriguing ideas and ingenious images that never fully coalesce into a moving or compelling whole.

Continue reading: Howl's Moving Castle Review

For Love Of The Game Review


Excellent
My brother says I shouldn't review sports movies. Because I'm not a sports fan, he says, I can't be objective.

He may have a point, but I don't think For Love of the Game is fundamentally a sports movie. Sure, suit Kevin Costner up in a baseball uniform and you might think you're looking at another Field of Dreams, but For Love of the Game is something we don't see a lot of. Allow me to explain.

Continue reading: For Love Of The Game Review

Confessions Of An American Girl Review


OK
When a movie opens on a teenager's repeated attempts to kill herself, well, you know we're in for some wild comedy!

A darkly black comedy of the trailer trash variety, Waking Up in Reno director Jordan Brady mostly misses with this study of working class malaise, the prison system, teen pregnancy, and closeted homosexuality. Well, Brady gets an A for effort in trying to get across such a broad collection of social messages, but his execution is merely a solid C.

Continue reading: Confessions Of An American Girl Review

The Badge Review


OK
Billy Bob channels Billy Bob, his Monster's Ball persona, that is, in this southern cop/tranny/stripper/murder/politico drama that's barely watchable for much more than half an hour at a time. Robby Henson is earnest, earnest, in his attempt to make the movie edgy (Patricia Arquette married a transsexual!!!), but he kills any chance at real intrigue with his slow-as-molasses pace and his laughable plot points, bad dialogue, and worse acting. My only question is what Starz! saw in the movie, aside from the names of its lead actors.

Stepmom Review


Bad
One of the worst atrocities of American cinema in recent memory, here we get a one-two punch from two women (Susan Sarandon and Julia Roberts) who really should have known better. The setup: Ed Harris is leaving his dried-up wife for a younger dish (see if you can guess who plays who), but mom won't leave well enough alone after she discovers stepmom is incompetent. A cancer diagnosis ensues, but there'll be lots of singing and cleansing tears before the funeral. Shiver. Just thinking about this story makes us throw up in our mouths a little bit. Chris Columbus's most notorious work.

Continue reading: Stepmom Review

Howl's Moving Castle Review


Excellent
Hayao Miyazaki's new film "Howl's Moving Castle"is so good that it shames virtually every animated film made since Miyazaki'slast, "SpiritedAway," graced movie screens in 2002.

If nothing else, it proves to Hollywood that its recentfailure in the animated realm comes not from old-fashioned hand-drawn animationbut from its severe lack of imagination and over-reliance on fart jokesand pop culture references.

The first of Miyazaki's films to be based on a book, "Howl'sMoving Castle" quickly establishes itself with the director's personalsignature, bursting with enough ideas and imagination to make up half adozen summer movies.

It begins, as most of his stories do, with a shy younggirl, Sophie (voiced for this English-language version by Emily Mortimer).She works in a hat shop and humbly watches as life passes her by. But oneday a handsome fellow -- whom she will come to know as Master Howl (voicedby Christian Bale) -- rescues her from an alleyway altercation and accidentallysteers her into all-new problems, involving several ghostly, globular thingswearing porkpie hats.

Continue reading: Howl's Moving Castle Review

The Ballad Of Jack & Rose Review


Weak
"The Ballad of Jack and Rose" concerns several strange characterswho just scream for something strange and unusual to say. But writer/directorRebecca Miller, daughter of playwright Arthur Miller, only gives them themost ordinary, mundane movie dialogue imaginable.

Miller sets her story, about an ailing father (Daniel Day-Lewis)and his teenage daughter (Camilla Belle), in and around an abandoned 1970shippie commune.

Father Jack and daughter Rose have lived an isolated life,farming and building tree forts, and have turned out rather odd.

Jack ordinarily spends a good deal of time railing againstan evil housing developer (Beau Bridges) who is looking to spoil the island.But for a change of pace, he impulsively invites his secret lover, Kathleen(Catherine Keener), and her two sons, chunky Rodney (Ryan McDonald) andthuggish Thaddius (Paul Dano) to move in. Although this new trio has notbeen raised in a commune, they're just as troubled as Jack and Rose, andtalk just as blandly.

Continue reading: The Ballad Of Jack & Rose Review

Cold Mountain Review


Weak

From the very first words of its opening voice-over, inwhich a detectable trace of Aussie inflection invades Nicole Kidman's affectedSouthern accent, there's something amiss with "Cold Mountain,"a two-and-a-half-hour Civil War epic built around a lackluster love story,written and directed by an Englishman, starring half a dozen British actorsand shot in Romania.

Sweeping in scope, the picture's earnest intentions, periodatmosphere and cinematic beauty are above reproach as it portrays brutal,bloody, brother-against-brother battlefields and a North Carolina home-fronthamlet where prim, city-bred newcomer Ada Monroe (Nicole Kidman) waitsfor the return of her soldier sweetheart while struggling to survive onher dead father's farm.

And yet, the emotional investment in the characters issomething less than sweeping. The passionless decorum of Ada's first-reelcourtship by the adoring but reticent Inman (Jude Law), the declarationof war which cuts short their time together, and the questionable castingof Kidman -- who at 36 is too old to be credible as a bashful unmarriedbelle in 1864 Dixie -- result in a lack of validity and vitality that isn'tremedied until the invigorating second-act arrival of Renee Zellweger.

Continue reading: Cold Mountain Review

Life As A House Review


OK

Shaping an entire story around one potent metaphysical metaphor, "Life as a House" overcomes many contrived and manipulative plot elements to prevail as a genuinely moving fable about a man building his dream house as he's dying of cancer.

The whimsically earnest Kevin Kline stars as George Monroe, a ramshackle guy with a ramshackle house that he's been talking about tearing down for 20 years. His wife left him when their now-teenage son was a toddler because George's lack of dedication extended to their marriage as well. The neighbors on his posh sea cliff cul-de-sac also turn up their noses at George and his eyesore of a peeled-paint hovel -- but since he enjoys tweaking those noses, that's OK by him.

Ironically, George is an architect -- albeit an architect so stuck in his ways that he's fired for refusing to get with the times and design on a computer. Long ago he blue-printed his dream home for the lot where his crumbling cottage stands -- but until he learns he's not long for this world, he's never had the tenacity to follow through.

Continue reading: Life As A House Review

Saved! Review


Good

Convinced she was doing God's work by sleeping with her fey ice-skater boyfriend to keep him from "turning gay," blissfully naive and blindly devotional Mary (Jena Malone) is now a knocked-up senior at American Eagle Christian Academy -- and suddenly having dark-comedy doubts about everything she's been taught to believe.

This is the foundation of "Saved!," an incisively wry, low-key indie that almost -- almost -- manages to deliver its sardonically tart message of tolerance without making one-dimensional cartoons out of its judgmental, Bible-beating antagonists.

Co-written and directed by first-time filmmaker Brian Dannelly (who attended a Catholic elementary school, a Jewish summer camp and a Baptist high school while growing up), "Saved!" is narrated from Mary's point of view as she navigates a snake pit of high school gossip dangerously coupled with religious self-righteousness.

Continue reading: Saved! Review

The Dangerous Lives Of Altar Boys Review


OK

"The Dangerous Lives of Altar Boys" gets its title from the pranks pulled by its main characters, a pair of trouble-making Catholic school kids engaged in a never-ending battle of wills with the hard-hearted nun in their home room.

Dubbed "Nunzilla" by the boys, and played by Jodie Foster in battle-ax mode, she's a concerned but misguided tyrant in the classroom, barking about the evils of William Blake poetry and deliberately embarrassing young Tim Sullivan (Kieran Culkin). In front of his peers she rubs in the fact that he's been held back a year and suggests her class pray for his family's domestic problems.

With her painfully pinched face and her peg leg, she's also the inspiration for the motorcycle-riding, vampire-like antagonist in a comic book the boys habitually sketch out in spiral notebooks. Ringleader Tim and his sometimes reluctant adherent Francis (Emile Hirsch) are superheroes in this cartoon fantasy, which comes to life in vivid animated passages of the movie (created by Todd McFarlane of "Spawn" fame) that revel in the boys' collective imagination.

Continue reading: The Dangerous Lives Of Altar Boys Review

Donnie Darko Review


Very Good

Jimmy Stewart would never have been able to cope with the giant rabbit that haunts Donnie Darko's demented waking nightmares. This thing is no friendly cottontail like Harvey. It's a macabre-looking monster with a hard, malformed pewter face, snaggled teeth and ominous blank eyes without pupils.

This rabbit's name is Frank, and he may or may not be a figment of the heavily medicated, intensely tormented imagination of the delusional teenage boy at the center of the engrossingly bizarre, mind-bending fringe film "Donnie Darko."

Whatever Frank is, it's his hypnotic influence over the eerily vexed title character (played by Jake Gyllenhaal) that launches him into a surreal labyrinth of increasingly esoteric encounters, starting the night Donnie sleepwalks away from his parents' house, seduced by the chilling sound of Frank's resonating, semi-synthetic voice. The world will end in 28 days, five hours, 52 minutes and 12 seconds, the diabolic bunny intones.

Continue reading: Donnie Darko Review

Jena Malone

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Jena Malone

Date of birth

21st November, 1984

Occupation

Actor

Sex

Female

Height

1.65




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Jena Malone Movies

Nocturnal Animals Trailer

Nocturnal Animals Trailer

For a short time, Edward and Susan had a happy marriage, they lived in a...

The Neon Demon Trailer

The Neon Demon Trailer

The Neon Demon follows the journey of its protagonist Jesse (Elle Fanning) when she makes...

Batman V Superman: Dawn Of Justice Trailer

Batman V Superman: Dawn Of Justice Trailer

Every superhero has a dark side and being 100% human, Batman is in doubt over...

Batman V Superman: Dawn Of Justice - Official Trailer

Batman V Superman: Dawn Of Justice - Official Trailer

What happens when two superheroes with vastly differing opinions come head to head? Well, not...

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The Hunger Games: Mockingjay Part 2 Movie Review

The Hunger Games: Mockingjay Part 2 Movie Review

Suzanne Collins' saga comes to a suitably epic conclusion in a climactic series of battles...

Time Out Of Mind Trailer

Time Out Of Mind Trailer

George is a man whose life has turned upside down. With no possessions and no...

The Hunger Games: Mockingjay - Part 2 Final Trailer

The Hunger Games: Mockingjay - Part 2 Final Trailer

Katniss Everdeen is determined to take down President Snow once and for all. Too many...

Batman V Superman: Dawn Of Justice - Comic Con Trailer

Batman V Superman: Dawn Of Justice - Comic Con Trailer

Clark Kent is a reporter for the Daily Planet in his everyday life, but a...

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The Hunger Games: Mockingjay Part 2 - Join The Revolution Trailer

The Hunger Games: Mockingjay Part 2 - Join The Revolution Trailer

Having successfully rescued Peeta and the other Hunger Games victors, Katniss Everdeen is feeling the...

Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice - Teaser Trailer

Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice - Teaser Trailer

When an alien lifeform crashed to Earth decades ago, no one noticed. When his own...

Inherent Vice Trailer

Inherent Vice Trailer

Larry "Doc" Sportello (Joaquin Phoenix) is a simple man. When he's not abusing illicit substances,...

The Hunger Games: Mockingjay, Part 1 Trailer

The Hunger Games: Mockingjay, Part 1 Trailer

With the incredible ramifications of the end of the yearly ritualistic sacrificial televised Hunger Games,...

Inherent Vice Trailer

Inherent Vice Trailer

Doc Sportello (Joaquin Phoenix) is a private investigator living in Los Angeles during the tail...

The Hunger Games: Mockingjay Part 1 'Our Leader The Mockingjay' Trailer

The Hunger Games: Mockingjay Part 1 'Our Leader The Mockingjay' Trailer

Katniss Everdeen has survived the latest political disaster of Panem following the shocking 75th Hunger...

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