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Jeffrey Tambor - 22nd Annual Screen Actors Guild Awards at The Shrine Expo Hall - Arrivals at Shrine Auditorium, Screen Actors Guild - Los Angeles, California, United States - Saturday 30th January 2016

Jeffrey Tambor
Jeffrey Tambor and Kasia Ostlun

Jeffrey Tambor , Kasia Ostlun - 22nd Annual Screen Actors Guild Awards at The Shrine Expo Hall - Arrivals at The Shrine Expo Hall, Screen Actors Guild - Los Angeles, California, United States - Saturday 30th January 2016

Jeffrey Tambor and Kasia Ostlun
Jeffrey Tambor
Jeffrey Tambor
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Jeffrey Tambor

Jeffrey Tambor - 22nd Annual Screen Actors Guild Awards at The Shrine Expo Hall - Press Room at Shrine Auditorium, Screen Actors Guild - Los Angeles, California, United States - Saturday 30th January 2016

Jeffrey Tambor
Jeffrey Tambor
Jeffrey Tambor
Jeffrey Tambor
Jeffrey Tambor
Jeffrey Tambor

Jeffrey Tambor - 22nd Annual Screen Actors Guild Awards at The Shrine Expo Hall - Outside Arrivals at Shrine Auditorium, Screen Actors Guild - Los Angeles, California, United States - Saturday 30th January 2016

Jeffrey Tambor
Jeffrey Tambor

Jeffrey Tambor - The 21st Annual Critics' Choice Awards at Barker Hangar, Critics' Choice Awards - Santa Monica, California, United States - Monday 18th January 2016

Jeffrey Tambor
Jeffrey Tambor

Jeffrey Tambor , Kasia Ostlun - BAFTA Los Angeles Awards Season Tea at The Four Season Los Angeles - Arrivals at The Four Season Los Angeles at Beverly Hills - Los Angeles, California, United States - Saturday 9th January 2016

Jeffrey Tambor and Kasia Ostlun

Jeffrey Tambor , Guest - BAFTA Los Angeles Awards Season Tea at The Four Season Los Angeles - Arrivals at The Four Season Los Angeles at Beverly Hills - Los Angeles, California, United States - Saturday 9th January 2016

Jeffrey Tambor and Guest
Jeffrey Tambor and Guest
Jeffrey Tambor and Guest

Jeffrey Tambor - Opening night of Fiddler On the Roof at the Broadway Theatre - Arrivals. at Broadway Theatre, - New York City, New York, United States - Monday 21st December 2015

Jeffrey Tambor
Jeffrey Tambor
Alan Alda, Arlene Alda, Jeffrey Tambor and Kasia Ostlun
Alan Alda and Jeffrey Tambor

Jeffrey Tambor - Season Two premiere of Amazon's 'Transparent' held at SilverScreen Theater at the Pacific Design Center - Arrivals at Pacific Design Center - Los Angeles, California, United States - Monday 9th November 2015

Jeffrey Tambor
Jeffrey Tambor
Jeffrey Tambor
Jeffrey Tambor

Jeffrey Tambor - The 67th Emmy Awards Pressroom at Emmy Awards - Los Angeles, California, United States - Monday 21st September 2015

Jeffrey Tambor
Jeffrey Tambor

Jeffrey Tambor - 67th Annual Emmy Awards at Microsoft Theatre at Microsoft Theatre, Emmy Awards - Los Angeles, California, United States - Sunday 20th September 2015

Jeffrey Tambor
Jeffrey Tambor
Jeffrey Tambor
Jeffrey Tambor
Jeffrey Tambor

Jeffrey Tambor - 67th Primetime Emmy Awards - Press Room at Microsoft Theater at LA Live, Primetime Emmy Awards, Emmy Awards - Los Angeles, California, United States - Monday 21st September 2015

Jeffrey Tambor
Jeffrey Tambor
Jeffrey Tambor
Jeffrey Tambor
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Jeffrey Tambor

Jeffrey Tambor - TV Guide and TV Insider present The Television Industry Advocacy Awards Gala held at the Sunset Tower - Outside Arrivals - Los Angeles, California, United States - Friday 18th September 2015

Jeffrey Tambor

Jeffrey Tambor - TV Guide and TV Insider present The Television Industry Advocacy Awards Gala held at the Sunset Tower - Arrivals at Sunset Tower Hotel - West Hollywood, California, United States - Friday 18th September 2015

Jeffrey Tambor
Jeffrey Tambor
Jeffrey Tambor
Jeffrey Tambor
Jeffrey Tambor
Jeffrey Tambor

Jeffrey Tambor, Amy Landecker, Gaby Hoffmann, Jay Duplass and Jill Soloway - 'Transparent' presents 'Meet the Family' Panel Discussion and Q&A - Arrivals at Directors Guild of America Theater - Los Angeles, CA - Los Angeles, California, United States - Monday 1st June 2015

Jeffrey Tambor, Amy Landecker, Gaby Hoffmann, Jay Duplass and Jill Soloway
Jeffrey Tambor
Jeffrey Tambor
Jeffrey Tambor
Jeffrey Tambor
Jeffrey Tambor

Jeffrey Tambor and Jill Soloway - Photographs from the TIME 100 Gala which honors TIME's 100 Most Influential People In The World. The even was held at Jazz at the Lincoln Center in New York City, New York, United States - Wednesday 22nd April 2015

Jeffrey Tambor and Jill Soloway
Jeffrey Tambor
Jeffrey Tambor

Jeffrey Tambor - 16th Annual InStyle and Warner Bros. Golden Globe After Party - Arrivals at Beverly Hilton Hotel, Golden Globe - Beverly Hills, California, United States - Monday 12th January 2015

Jeffrey Tambor
Jeffrey Tambor
Jeffrey Tambor
Jeffrey Tambor

Jeffrey Tambor - 16th Annual InStyle and Warner Bros. Golden Globe afterparty - Arrivals at Beverly Hilton Hotel, Golden Globe - Beverly Hills, California, United States - Sunday 11th January 2015

Jeffrey Tambor
Jeffrey Tambor
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Jeffrey Tambor

Jeffrey Tambor - Jeffrey Tambor departs from Los Angeles International Airport (LAX) - Los Angeles, California, United States - Tuesday 16th September 2014

Jeffrey Tambor
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Jeffrey Tambor

Jeffrey Tambor and Kasia Ostlun - Opening night of Lady Day at Emerson's Bar and Grill at the Circle in the Square Theatre - Arrivals. - New York, New York, United States - Sunday 13th April 2014

Jeffrey Tambor and Kasia Ostlun
Jeffrey Tambor
Jeffrey Tambor

The Hangover Part II Review


Weak
Proving that 2009's The Hangover was a fluke, this sequel returns to filmmaker Todd Phillips' more usual mean-spirited style, abandoning laughs for a series of painfully awkward scenarios held together by a contrived plot.

Having finally put the embarrassment of "that" weekend in Las Vegas behind him, Stu (Helms) is ready to settle down with fiance Lauren (Chung), who's planning their romantic wedding in Thailand. But after a night drinking on the beach, Stu wakes up in a Bangkok flat with fast-thinking friend Phil (Cooper), nutcase Alan (Galifianakis), an eerily smart monkey and Mr Chow (Jeong), the criminal who caused such chaos in Vegas. The problem is that Lauren's 16-year-old brother Teddy (Mason Lee) is missing. But what exactly happened last night?

Continue reading: The Hangover Part II Review

Win Win Review


Excellent
As with The Station Agent and The Visitor, McCarthy creates a series of encounters for some astonishingly vivid characters, and the result is an entertaining film that challenges prejudice. It's also both funny and moving.

Mike (Giamatti) is a New Jersey lawyer struggling to make ends meet when he discovers he can earn a bit extra as the guardian of senile client Leo (Young).

But his wife Jackie (Ryan) only finds out when Leo's 16-year-old grandson Kyle (Shaffer) turns up needing a place to stay while his mother (Lynskey) goes through rehab. To keep him busy, Mike invites Kyle along to the wrestling practice he coaches with his friends (Tambor and Cannavale). Surprise: Kyle's a gifted wrestler who may help the team win for a change.

Continue reading: Win Win Review

The Hangover: Part II Trailer


Best friends Phil, Alan, Stu and Doug reunite for yet another wedding, this time, it's Stu's turn to tie the knot and he and his fiancé decide the perfect location for their marriage will be in Thailand. After experiencing Doug's pre-wedding rituals in Las Vegas, Stu has opted for a far more civilized stag do, he's arranged for he and his boys to have brunch. The guys are joined by Stu's wife-to-be's (teenage) brother, after all they're only going for brunch, four grown men should be able to look after him.

Continue: The Hangover: Part II Trailer

Paul Review


Very Good
Packed with references to other films instead of original jokes, this goofy comedy at least keeps us laughing all the way through. The idea itself is hilarious, and the movie's assembled with skill and energy.

Graeme and Clive (Pegg and Frost) are sci-fi geeks who realise their dream to drive a Winnebago across the American Southwest visiting UFO hotspots to re-enact favourite movie and TV scenes. Then they stumble across an actual alien named Paul (voiced by Rogen as an Alf-style wisenheimer). They agree to help him get home, but are hotly pursued by a tenacious Man in Black (Bateman) and two X-Files agents (Hader and Lo Truglio). They are also joined by someone who's even more alien to them: devout one-eyed creationist Ruth (Wiig), who Paul calls a "God-bothering cyclops".

Continue reading: Paul Review

Tangled Review


Very Good
Disney returns to a successful formula for this enjoyable animated romp based on a Grimm fairy tale. It's bright and funny, but not too snappy, and skips the pop-culture references for a more timeless approach.

On the eve of her 18th birthday, Rapunzel (Moore) senses that there's more to life than the tower where she has always lived with her mother Gothel (Murphy).

Indeed, Gothel kidnapped her as an infant from her parents, the King and Queen, because her hair has rejuvenating properties that keeps Gothel forever young.

Continue reading: Tangled Review

Paul Trailer


For the majority of their lives Graeme and Clive have been huge sci-fi geeks, and when the two Brits find an opportunity to take a road trip across America and visit Area 51, they can hardly contain their excitement. What the two friends weren't to know was that they were soon to have a new friend in the truck keeping them company; Paul.

Continue: Paul Trailer

The Invention Of Lying Review


Good
As bright and witty as this film is, it never quite generates enough momentum to be a comedy classic. It feels more like a gently meandering movie version of a high-concept sketch. At least it's peppered with sharp gags.

In an alternate reality in which humanity hasn't developed the ability to lie, Mark (Gervais) is a loser who accidentally discovers dishonesty and quickly realises the power of his words in a world where everyone believes him. Lying his way to fame and wealth is easy, but things start to spiral out of his control when people develop a religion based on his tall tales. And his biggest problem is that he wants Anna (Garner) to fall in love with him. But lying to her would be cheating.

Continue reading: The Invention Of Lying Review

The Hangover Review


Excellent
The guys' trip to Vegas. The bromance of the bachelor party. These are current cultural givens, situations that suggest their own outrageous events without you ever visualizing the final results. It's all sin, shots, and strippers (mandatory on the strippers). Anyone venturing into such territory -- artistically, that is -- runs a two-fold risk of failing anticipation and flatly fulfilling expectations. It's within such complicated comedic realities that Old School's Todd Phillips comes to the concept, and he delivers big time. Uproariously funny, with one certified star-making turn among all the anarchy, this pre-marriage road trip turns the events of one night of drunken debauchery into the stuff of movie myth -- and you can't help but laugh all the way through.

Doug Billings (Justin Bartha) is getting married in two days, and his best friends Phil Wenneck (Bradley Cooper) and dentist Dr. Stu Price (Ed Helms) are taking him to Vegas for his bachelor party. Unfortunately, the groom's freakish future brother-in-law Alan (Zach Galifianakis) is tagging along as well. With their villa at Caesar's Palace secured, they head up to the hotel roof for a round of shots before hitting the strip. The next morning, Doug is gone and the remaining "party" members awake in a sea of destruction. Stu has lost a tooth. There's a newborn baby in the closet. And there's a real man-eating tiger in the bathroom. Hoping to track down their pal, Phil, Stu, and Alan begin searching. Eventually, they run into Asian gangsters, Mike Tyson, and Stu's quickie stripper bride Jade (Heather Graham), but no Doug. And time is running out before the groom has to walk down the aisle.

Continue reading: The Hangover Review

Arrested Development: Season Two Review


Essential
Season Two is when Arrested Development transcended simply being television's funniest show and became its very best. Its humor became richer and its savage cultural references became slyer and nastier. If the brilliant comedy's first season was enough to forever classify Arrested as a perennial classic, then its second season established the show as one of the great, edgy arbiters of pop cultural significance. No subject was too sacred to be humorously eviscerated by Arrested Development writers, and no uncomfortable human characteristic too dark to be viciously lampooned by their ever-complicated story arcs.

Arrested Development was always an ingenious cross between crisp satire and loopy human cartoon, but season two hit a stride from the start; the season opener, "The One Where Michael Leaves," picks up exactly where the first season left off, and enriches the already-complicated plot with hysterical new wrinkles. Family patriarch George Bluth Sr. (Jeffrey Tambor) has broken out of prison and escaped to Mexico, while well-adjusted middle son and our nobel hero Michael (Jason Batemen) has made a decision to break from the family entirely. As usual, he keeps getting sucked back in for a variety of reasons: with George Sr. on the lam, Michael must prove his innocence in connection with his father's shady business deal with Saddam Hussein (yes, it just keeps getting deeper), and he would also need money to post bail if he were unfairly arrested. But as complicated as Arrested can get, its themes always remain truly simple -- more than any other reason, Michael returns because his family needs him, and Michael himself has a need to be needed.

Continue reading: Arrested Development: Season Two Review

Arrested Development: Season One Review


Essential
Arrested Development is the defining television comedy of the decade. Its influence can be traced through several of the more popular network comedies that debuted since its sad, premature cancellation, most specifically shows like The Office, My Name is Earl, and especially 30 Rock. Created by the now-cult comedy legend Mitch Hurwitz, the show completely redefined what a "sitcom" could and should be -- shot on a single handheld camera, written as a quasi-documentary with a deadpan narrator (a fabulously matter-of-fact Ron Howard), focusing on a family that is barely likable, and telling stories so ridiculous they strain credibility. Yet the show is oddly endearing -- these characters are so fully actualized and the writing so brilliant that every element of the show works seamlessly.

The series made such a mockery of the traditional, homogenized three-camera sitcom with cheap sets and canned laughter, to the point that very few of them even exist anymore. Most TV comedies now chase after the off-the-wall genius of Arrested Development, with its sly, easy-to-miss references to every aspect of current pop culture, and its uncanny knack for testing the devotion (and the memory banks) of its viewers with severely high-risk inside jokes. The show was a bold concept, a sharply radical turn from the ordinary, and the funniest damn program to appear on television before or since its three-season run.

Continue reading: Arrested Development: Season One Review

Hellboy II: The Golden Army Review


Excellent
Get in a discussion about comic-book movies and someone will indubitably bring up this theory: Part one of a comic-book movie anthology is always just OK; the series peaks with part two; and in part three (usually the final chapter) everything falls apart. (Think X-Men, Spider-man, and Superman). Hellboy II only furthers this theory. Part one, though visually sensational, delivered a weak jab in terms of its story, characters, and writing. But its sequel connects with a mighty punch, delivering everything you could possibly want from a summer blockbuster and more.

Hellboy II takes the fantastic make-up artistry, creature creation, and set design that we grew fond of in Pan's Labyrinth and combines all of these elements with mindblowing CGI and stunning choreography. The script this time around is sharp and witty; you'll be laughing for most of this movie (which is good, because Hellboy II would look silly if it took itself too seriously). Most importantly, the movie contains some of the best (i.e., least-fake-looking) action sequences I've ever seen in a comic-book movie, and lots of them, too, which makes it even better than Iron Man, its biggest summer contender next to the upcoming Dark Knight.

Continue reading: Hellboy II: The Golden Army Review

...and Justice For All. Review


Very Good
Sorry to break it to you, but the line "The whole system's out of order!" does not appear in ...And Justice for All., Norman Jewison's send-up of the American legal system and one of the films with the most complicated punctuation ever to be released

The actual line that Al Pacino bellows out in the film's final scene, in case you're wondering, is this: "You're out of order! You're out of order! The whole trial is out of order! They're out of order!" Nah, doesn't quite roll off the tongue the same way, does it?

Continue reading: ...and Justice For All. Review

Slipstream Review


Weak
"It means everything and it means nothing at all. Life is so illusion-like, so dreamlike, that I think it's all a dream... a dream within a dream. What is real? What is fantasy? You grasp this moment and then, suddenly, it's gone. I was talking 10 minutes ago, but that's all gone..."

Isn't it funny that if a stockbroker said that, his friends and family would question his psychiatric health and advise him to find profession help, but when a 69-year-old Academy Award winner says that, he not only gets a movie made, but attracts a renowned cast and crew boasting a combined total of more than 250 awards, honors, and nominations?

Continue reading: Slipstream Review

The Larry Sanders Show: Not Just The Best Of... Review


Extraordinary
It's a cliche now to complain that HBO has the best original programming on television, but never has that been more true than in the case of The Larry Sanders Show, which ran for six seasons from 1992 to 1998 and was nominated for (and won) countless Emmys and every other award under the sun.

The show is pure genius and pure simplicity: Larry Sanders (Garry Shandling) is a late night talk show host on an unspecified network in the post-Carson era. Each week we were treated to the behind-the-scenes antics that go on before such a show can get on the air five nights a week: At its slapstick simplest we have Carol Burnett fleeing spiders by climbing on Larry's back. At its smarmy sickest, we have Larry's agent (Bob Odenkirk) selling him down the river so he can move on to greener pastures: Namely one Jon Stewart, a guest host for the show who became a running theme in later years as a cheap, network-approved replacement for the skewing-too-old Larry.

Continue reading: The Larry Sanders Show: Not Just The Best Of... Review

How The Grinch Stole Christmas (2000) Review


Very Good
How the Grinch Stole Christmas (a film which should otherwise need no introduction whatsoever) reminds me of that strange Christmas feeling that hits about five minutes after all of the presents have been opened. It's that indescribable longing for more, even if nothing's really missing. There's so much expectation, so much buildup, that somehow even though you're satisfied, it's not quite enough.

Jim Carrey is fabulous as the titular Grinch, that much is sure. His trademark physical antics fit "the mean one" perfectly, without stealing the heart from one of Dr. Seuss' most notorious characters. He proves that he's up to the tall order of balancing two larger-than-life personalities: himself and the Grinch. The delicate mix that Carrey strikes -- giving just enough of himself to the role without obliterating the creature in the process -- is really the beauty of his performance.

Continue reading: How The Grinch Stole Christmas (2000) Review

Arrested Development: Season Three Review


Extraordinary
The only real flaw in the third season of Mitch Hurwitz's flat-out brilliant sitcom Arrested Development is its unfortunate abbreviation. Fox delighted the show's fan base with a surprise pickup at the end of its second season, and then, apparently feeling remorseful about appeasing any segment of its audience not interested in American Idol, took it back, as far as they could; season three runs only 13 episodes, rather than the standard 22. Needless to say, there will be no season four.

Of course, this being Arrested Development and all, there are more laughs in those 13 episodes than a lifetime of just about any another live-action show. Hurwitz's show chronicles the twists and turns of the formerly wealthy, currently imperiled (and morally impaired) Bluth family, led by good son Michael (Jason Bateman). The show moves like a soap opera, cramming an hour's worth of bizarre plots into 20 minutes or so. Season three contains the most ambitious story arc of the show's run, wherein lovelorn Michael finds a new relationship with Rita (guest star Charlize Theron, appearing in five of the baker's dozen), a charming English woman harboring a deep secret. You may guess the twist ahead of the climactic revelation, but even if you do, it's just as much fun to notice the many clues that start to seem hilariously obvious.

Continue reading: Arrested Development: Season Three Review

Never Again Review


Weak
From American Pie to Porky's, most sex comedies entice audiences with gorgeous juveniles, raging hormones, dirty humor, and lots of gratuitous nudity. Never Again twists the genre and buries the juvenile clichés...but, unfortunately, it isn't a pleasant change. All the sex stays, but the film replaces the juveniles with wrinkly senior citizens. I never thought I'd say this, but I'd much rather watch teens poking their genitals into fruit pies!

Indeed, it is truly as disgusting as it sounds: a sex comedy with old people. Yuk! The movie, on the other hand, argues that young people aren't the only sexually active people in society. That's true; I'm sure old people have sex all the time. Heck, they can screw three times a day for all I care. But please, for the love of God, keep it off the silver screen!

Continue reading: Never Again Review

Muppets From Space Review


Good
Many critics will disagree with me, but I'm of the opinion that the Muppets, as characters, can do no wrong. Each Muppet has well-developed, quirky traits that make people of all ages love them. And that is what saved this film.

Unlike most of the other Muppet films, our featured star in this particular one is Gonzo. As we all know, Gonzo is a "Whatever", but this explanation of his species is no longer good enough for the long-nosed freak. He longs for family, and the satisfaction of knowing what he is. Then no sooner than you can say, "Wakka-Wakka", Gonzo's origins begin to reveal themselves. And they do this, ever so appropriately, through his breakfast cereal (well I thought it was funny).

Continue reading: Muppets From Space Review

How The Grinch Stole Christmas Review


Very Good
How the Grinch Stole Christmas (a film which should otherwise need no introduction whatsoever) reminds me of that strange Christmas feeling that hits about five minutes after all of the presents have been opened. It's that indescribable longing for more, even if nothing's really missing. There's so much expectation, so much buildup, that somehow even though you're satisfied, it's not quite enough.

Jim Carrey is fabulous as the titular Grinch, that much is sure. His trademark physical antics fit "the mean one" perfectly, without stealing the heart from one of Dr. Seuss' most notorious characters. He proves that he's up to the tall order of balancing two larger-than-life personalities: himself and the Grinch. The delicate mix that Carrey strikes -- giving just enough of himself to the role without obliterating the creature in the process -- is really the beauty of his performance.

Continue reading: How The Grinch Stole Christmas Review

Teaching Mrs. Tingle Review


OK
Once upon a time there was a writer named Kevin, who wanted to make a big splash in Hollywood. He wrote a movie called Killing Mrs. Tingle, which didn't sell, so he tried again. The next time he wrote a movie called Scream, which single-handedly revived the horror genre, paving the way for big horror flicks... and even small ones like The Blair Witch Project.

And then he made a TV show called Dawson's Creek, which was also a huge success. And another horror flick. And Scream 2. And then this writer was the hottest thing on Sunset Blvd., and even Killing Mrs. Tingle started to look good. Miramax bought it. They even let the guy direct.

Continue reading: Teaching Mrs. Tingle Review

The SpongeBob SquarePants Movie Review


Excellent
If you've never seen the Nickelodeon show SpongeBob SquarePants, you're probably wondering why you'd ever want to see a kiddie movie based on a kiddie network's TV show. But if you're curious enough about the SpongeBob hype to read this review, please allow me sell you on the virtues of this often clever and very funny movie based on an equally sharp and hip animated series.

For the uninitiated, SpongeBob (Tom Kenny) is a yellow sponge clothed in square pants that "lives in a pineapple under the sea," as the song states, in the middle of a town of fish, crabs, and other sea life called Bikini Bottom. In this 90-minute outing, our hero is glum that he's been passed over for the job of his dreams - manager of the new Krusty Krab 2 - because he's "just a kid." But he can't stay sad for long; the evil Plankton (Mr. Lawrence) has launched "Plan Z," which frames SB's boss Mr. Krab for the theft of King Neptune's (Jeffrey Tambor) crown.

Continue reading: The SpongeBob SquarePants Movie Review

Hellboy Review


Good
You can't help but dig Hellboy the character - born a demon, summoned by Nazis, saved by Americans, raised to fight otherworldly evil creatures, and played by Ron Perlman.

What you feel about Hellboy the movie is an altogether different topic.

Continue reading: Hellboy Review

Girl, Interrupted Review


Good
As near as I can tell, the 60s were about being crazy. Whether it was being crazy while fighting communists in Vietnam, or being crazy while burning bras, or being crazy while marching on Washington, the 60s resounded with insanity. So what better way to tell the story of the 60s than from within the walls of a mental ward known as Claymoore? Hence is the promise given to us in the ads of Girl, Interrupted.

The reality is a bit different.

Continue reading: Girl, Interrupted Review

Girl, Interrupted Review


Weak

Teen angst gets the "One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest" treatment in "Girl, Interrupted," James Mangold's disappointingly common and commercial follow-up to his earlier, low-budget wonders "Heavy" and "Cop Land."

Poor Winona Ryder -- in her late 20s and still playing teenagers -- stars as 1960s suburban college drop-out Susanna, a compulsive writer stuck in an upscale asylum for a "rest" after mixing booze and a bottle of pain killers.

Borderline Personality Disorder is the maddeningly vague diagnosis of her psychological bugaboos -- the movie seems to want to make a point about our culture's tendency to seek scapegoats for our neuroses -- so Susanna is packed off to a New England psychiatric hospital where, in between the pill dole from the nursing staff, she writes endlessly in her dog-eared journal and fills it with tell-tale drawings the camera can cut to for moments of cheap insight.

Continue reading: Girl, Interrupted Review

How The Grinch Stole Christmas Review


OK

Director Ron Howard paints Jim Carrey green and pretty much turns him loose on the set in his live-action, eye-popping adaptation of "Dr. Seuss' How the Grinch Stole Christmas."

While that might sound like a recipe for an egomaniacal disaster, Carrey's very in-character antics are what keep the film moving forward despite being bogged down with superfluous plot points to pad the run time. I mean, did we really need motivational flashbacks of the mean one's unhappy childhood?

An event-movie-sized cornucopia of mixed blessings, this "Grinch" is top-heavy with great grins, but it boasts its fair share of vexatious cringes as well. Bad songs attack out of nowhere, liberties are taken with Dr. Seuss' magical vision and the picture takes highly hypocritical digs at the commercialization of Christmas.

Continue reading: How The Grinch Stole Christmas Review

Muppets From Space Review


Good

The thing I've always liked best about Muppet movies isall the pop culture sight gags that send adults laughing over the backsof their chairs while the kids sitting next to them just giggle at theMuppets because they're the Muppets.

"Muppets From Space" has more of these over-the- heads- of- babes gags than any of its predecessors, and while thestory -- about hook-nosed, species-unknown Gonzo searching the stars forhis origins -- only moves forward in clumsy fits and starts, when the plotstalls out, the gaps are filled with funny, funny stuff.

After opening credits accompanied by a laughably ominousspace opera score, the story begins with a dream sequence in which Gonzois turned away from Noah's Ark because there's only one of him. As therain starts pouring down, Noah (F. Murray Abraham in a cameo) hands hima small umbrella and wishes him luck.

Continue reading: Muppets From Space Review

Hellboy Review


OK

The origin of the mutants in "X-Men" is a concept based on evolution that requires only a little suspension of disbelief. But a whole lot of supernatural B-movie overkill goes into the birth of the title character in "Hellboy" -- including occultish Nazis, a resurrected Rasputin, and the opening of an intergalactic wormhole meant to unleash the "seven gods of chaos" (whatever they are) upon the Earth.

The pre-credits sequence of this effects-heavy summer's-come-early superhero action flick -- based on Mike Mignola's cult comic of the same name -- is a real eye-roller, especially since a battalion of G.I. Joes sent expressly to stop this fascist-black-magic conspiracy just sits on its collective hands doing nothing until the whole shebang is already underway.

But once writer-director Guillermo del Toro ("Blade II," "The Devil's Backbone") moves into the modern day -- where the demon-like spawn of that evil experiment has paradoxically grown into a muscle-bound, horn-headed, red-skinned and stone-fisted, paranormal, crime-fighting anti-hero called Hellboy -- the film settles into a distinctively sharp, sardonic rhythm full of character and imagination.

Continue reading: Hellboy Review

Teaching Mrs Tingle Review


OK

"Teaching Mrs. Tingle" was the first screenplay ever written by Kevin Williamson, the scribe of "Scream," "Dawnson's Creek" and "The Faculty." And it shows.

His scripts have never been all that solid -- just clever and creatively ironic -- and the habitual, but somehow forgivable, faults of his other movies (massive plot holes, easy outs the characters are too dumb to take) are all the more conspicuous in this old script pulled out of mothballs for the writer's directorial debut.

But, like most of Williamson's work, "Tingle" is a guilty pleasure, the kind of dumb fun picture people loathe to admit they like.

Continue reading: Teaching Mrs Tingle Review

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Jeffrey Tambor Movies

The Death of Stalin Movie Review

The Death of Stalin Movie Review

Fans of the film In the Loop and the TV series Veep will definitely not...

The Death Of Stalin Trailer

The Death Of Stalin Trailer

It's 1953 and our story takes place in Russia - then known as the Soviet...

The Accountant Movie Review

The Accountant Movie Review

While this slick dramatic thriller plays with some intriguing ideas and themes, it never actually...

Trolls Movie Review

Trolls Movie Review

Almost pathologically buoyant, this brightly colourful animated comedy is so cheeky that it's impossible to...

The Accountant Trailer

The Accountant Trailer

Ben Affleck is cast as Christian Wolff in this new action thriller film The Accountant....

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The D Train Movie Review

The D Train Movie Review

A provocative drama wrapped in the skin of an adult sex comedy, this sharply written...

The D Train Trailer

The D Train Trailer

Nobody really wants to attend their school reunion. Nobody, except for maybe Dan Landsman (Jack...

The Hangover III Trailer

The Hangover III Trailer

Alan Garner is going through real emotional trauma when his beloved father passes away. Following...

The Hangover Part III Trailer

The Hangover Part III Trailer

Stu, Phil, Alan and Doug return to Las Vegas in the hilarious third instalment of...

Branded Trailer

Branded Trailer

Among a submissive and addictive world where businessmen control the minds of consumers, Misha comes...

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The Hangover Part II Movie Review

The Hangover Part II Movie Review

Proving that 2009's The Hangover was a fluke, this sequel returns to filmmaker Todd Phillips'...

Win Win Movie Review

Win Win Movie Review

As with The Station Agent and The Visitor, McCarthy creates a series of encounters for...

The Hangover: Part II Trailer

The Hangover: Part II Trailer

Best friends Phil, Alan, Stu and Doug reunite for yet another wedding, this time, it's...

Paul Movie Review

Paul Movie Review

Packed with references to other films instead of original jokes, this goofy comedy at least...

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