Jeff Goldblum Page 6

Jeff Goldblum

Jeff Goldblum Quick Links

News Pictures Video Film Footage Comments Quotes RSS

Jeff Goldblum - Jeff Goldblum departs on a flight from Los Angeles International Airport (LAX) - Los Angeles, California, United States - Wednesday 16th December 2015

Jeff Goldblum
Jeff Goldblum
Jeff Goldblum
Jeff Goldblum
Jeff Goldblum
Jeff Goldblum

Jeff Goldblum Faces A Threat Much Bigger Than Before In 'Independence Day: Resurgence' - Trailer


Jeff Goldblum Chris Hemsworth

It's been almost twenty years since Roland Emmerich's Oscar winning sci-fi thriller 'Independence Day', but if you thought the aliens were destroyed once and for all, think again. They're back with a vengeance in 'Independence Day: Resurgence', but even David Levinson wasn't prepared for this.

Independence Day Resurgence cast(Most of) the team is back!

Now very much aware that there is intelligent life on other planets, some of which happened to be a huge threat to Earth, director of the Earth Space Defense program (ESD) David Levinson has been gathering forces and building up the planet's defenses using extraterrestrial technology in anticipation of another future attack. Their victory was an incredible one two decades ago, but that doesn't mean the war is over.

Continue reading: Jeff Goldblum Faces A Threat Much Bigger Than Before In 'Independence Day: Resurgence' - Trailer

Jeff Goldblum , Emilie Livingston - Jeff Goldblum and wife Emilie Livingston shopping at The Grove in West Hollywood. - Los Angeles, California, United States - Monday 23rd November 2015

Jeff Goldblum and Emilie Livingston
Jeff Goldblum and Emilie Livingston
Jeff Goldblum and Emilie Livingston
Jeff Goldblum and Emilie Livingston
Jeff Goldblum and Emilie Livingston
Jeff Goldblum and Emilie Livingston

Emilie Livingston and Jeff Goldblum - Celebrities attend 2015 Vanity Fair Oscar Party at Wallis Annenberg Center for the Performing Arts with City Hall in Beverly Hills. at Wallis Annenberg Center for the Performing Arts - Los Angeles, California, United States - Sunday 22nd February 2015

Emilie Livingston and Jeff Goldblum
Emilie Livingston and Jeff Goldblum

Jeff Goldblum and Emilie Livingston - Jeff Goldblum and pregnant wife Emilie Livingston walking their pet dog in West Hollywood - Los Angeles, California, United States - Sunday 22nd March 2015

Jeff Goldblum and Emilie Livingston
Jeff Goldblum and Emilie Livingston
Jeff Goldblum and Emilie Livingston
Jeff Goldblum and Emilie Livingston
Jeff Goldblum and Emilie Livingston
Jeff Goldblum and Emilie Livingston

Jeff Goldblum and girlfriend - A host of stars including previous cast members were snapped as they arrived to the Rockerfeller Plaza for Saturday Night Live as it celebrated it's 40th anniversary with a star studded gala in New York, United States - Monday 16th February 2015

Jeff Goldblum and Girlfriend

Emilie Livingston and Jeff Goldblum - A host of stars were photographed on the red carpet as they arrived at the 21st Annual Screen Actors Guild Awards which were held at the Shrine auditorium in Los Angeles, California, United States - Sunday 25th January 2015

Emilie Livingston and Jeff Goldblum
Emilie Livingston and Jeff Goldblum

Emilie Livingston and Jeff Goldblum - A host of stars were photographed on the red carpet as they arrived at the 21st Annual Screen Actors Guild Awards which were held at the Shrine auditorium in Los Angeles, California, United States - Sunday 25th January 2015

Emilie Livingston and Jeff Goldblum
Emilie Livingston and Jeff Goldblum
Emilie Livingston and Jeff Goldblum
Emilie Livingston and Jeff Goldblum
Emilie Livingston and Jeff Goldblum
Emilie Livingston and Jeff Goldblum

Jeff Goldblum and Emilie Livingston - A host of stars were photographed on the red carpet as they arrived at the 21st Annual Screen Actors Guild Awards which were held at the Shrine auditorium in Los Angeles, California, United States - Monday 26th January 2015

Jeff Goldblum and Emilie Livingston
Jeff Goldblum and Emilie Livingston

Emilie Livingston and Jeff Goldblum - A variety of stars were photographed on the red carpet as they attended the Producers Guild of America's 26th Awards ceremony which was held at Hyatt Regency Century Plaza in Los Angeles, California, United States - Saturday 24th January 2015

Emilie Livingston and Jeff Goldblum

Emilie Livingston and Jeff Goldblum - A variety of stars were photographed on the red carpet as they attended the Producers Guild of America's 26th Awards ceremony which was held at Hyatt Regency Century Plaza in Los Angeles, California, United States - Sunday 25th January 2015

Emilie Livingston and Jeff Goldblum

Jeff Goldblum and Emilie Livingston - A variety of stars were photographed on the red carpet as they attended the Producers Guild of America's 26th Awards ceremony which was held at Hyatt Regency Century Plaza in Los Angeles, California, United States - Saturday 24th January 2015

Jeff Goldblum and Emilie Livingston
Jeff Goldblum and Emilie Livingston
Jeff Goldblum and Emilie Livingston
Jeff Goldblum and Emilie Livingston
Jeff Goldblum and Emilie Livingston

Jeff Goldblum - 'Mortdecai' Los Angeles Premiere - Arrivals at TLC Chinese Theatre - Los Angeles, United States - Wednesday 21st January 2015

Jeff Goldblum
Jeff Goldblum and Emilie Livingston
Jeff Goldblum and Emilie Livingston
Jeff Goldblum and Emilie Livingston
Jeff Goldblum and Emilie Livingston
Jeff Goldblum and Emilie Livingston

Emilie Livingston and Jeff Goldblum - A host of stars were photographed as they attended the UK premiere of 'Mortdecai' which stars American actor Johnny Depp. The premiere was held at the Empire cinema in Leicester Square, London - Thursday 22nd January 2015

Emilie Livingston and Jeff Goldblum
Jeff Goldblum
Jeff Goldblum
Jeff Goldblum
Jeff Goldblum
Jeff Goldblum

Jeff Goldblum Is Set To Become A Father To Wife Emilie Livingston's Unborn Son


Jeff Goldblum

Jeff Goldblum has announced that he's about to become a dad for the first time, at the grand age of 62, with his new wife Emilie Livingston, aged 32. Three months in, he unveiled the news on 'The Late Show with David Letterman'.

Jeff Goldblum and Emilie Livingston at the 2015 Golden Globes
Jeff Goldblum and Emilie Livingston to be parents

'The Grand Budapest Hotel' star seemed thrilled to finally reveal the news on the chat show, admitting that gymnast wife Emilie is 'three months pregnant'. The pair have only been married since November 2014, with Jeff having become engaged to the Olympian in the summer. 'She told me the day before we got married that she's pregnant', he said happily, and even revealed to viewers that they are expecting a baby boy.

Continue reading: Jeff Goldblum Is Set To Become A Father To Wife Emilie Livingston's Unborn Son

Jeff Goldblum and Emelie Livingston - 72nd Annual Golden Globe Awards at The Beverly Hilton Hotel - Arrivals at Golden Globe Awards, Beverly Hilton Hotel - Los Angeles, California, United States - Sunday 11th January 2015

Jeff Goldblum and Emelie Livingston

Jeff Goldblum - Various celebrities including actress Salma Hayek and pop star Lorde were photographed as they attended the 16th Annual InStyle and Warner Bros. Golden Globe after party in Los Angeles, California, United States - Monday 12th January 2015

Jeff Goldblum
Jeff Goldblum
Jeff Goldblum
Jeff Goldblum

Jeff Goldblum and Emilie Livingston - Jeff Goldblumholding hands with his wife Emilie Livingston as the go shopping at The Grove in Hollywood - Los Angeles, California, United States - Tuesday 9th December 2014

Jeff Goldblum and Emilie Livingston
Jeff Goldblum and Emilie Livingston
Jeff Goldblum and Emilie Livingston
Jeff Goldblum and Emilie Livingston
Jeff Goldblum and Emilie Livingston
Jeff Goldblum and Emilie Livingston

Jeff Goldblum and Emilie Livingston - 2nd annual an Evening of Environmental Excellence Gala held at a private residence - Arrivals - Beverly Hills, California, United States - Tuesday 5th March 2013

Jeff Goldblum and Emilie Livingston
Jeff Goldblum and Emilie Livingston
Jeff Goldblum and Emilie Livingston

Jeff Goldblum and Emilie Livingston - Jeff Goldblum takes his girlfriend Emilie Livingston shopping at The Grove in Hollywood - Los Angeles, California, United States - Thursday 30th October 2014

Jeff Goldblum and Emilie Livingston
Jeff Goldblum and Emilie Livingston
Jeff Goldblum and Emilie Livingston
Jeff Goldblum and Emilie Livingston
Jeff Goldblum and Emilie Livingston
Jeff Goldblum and Emilie Livingston

Snaps of a variety of stars as they arrived at the 24th Annual Environmental Media Awards presented by Toyota and Lexus at the Warner Bros Studio

Jeff Goldblum
Jeff Goldblum
Jeff Goldblum
Jeff Goldblum
Jeff Goldblum
Jeff Goldblum

Jeff Goldblum - Jeff Goldblum at Los Angeles International Airport (LAX) - Los Angeles, California, United States - Monday 8th September 2014

Jeff Goldblum
Jeff Goldblum
Jeff Goldblum
Jeff Goldblum
Jeff Goldblum
Jeff Goldblum

Wait, You Didn’t Know Jeff Goldblum Had A Jazz Band? Meet The Mildred Snitzer Orchestra


Jeff Goldblum

Far from being just that actor from Jurassic Park and Independence Day, Jeff Goldblum is also a jazz pianist who's about to make his big New York debut. Along with his band, The Mildred Snitzer Orchestra, Goldblum will be playing a string of dates this September at New York’s Cafe Carlyle. But did we miss something, since when has Jeff Goldblum also been an in-demand jazz musician?

Jeff GoldblumGoldblum leads The Mildred Snitzer Orchestra

We assume all celebrities have hobbies, but it seems Jeff Goldblum’s passion for piano playing has actually turned into something more like a second career. Having taken piano lessons as a child, Goldblum occasionally played piano in cocktail lounges as a teen before finding work as an actor. However in the late 90s he began making sporadic appearances across LA, after getting a band together with good friend John Mastro. Soon Jeff and his fellow musicians went from begin known as ‘Jeff Goldblum’s jazz band’ to the less imposing but more confusing, The Mildred Snitzer Orchestra.

Continue reading: Wait, You Didn’t Know Jeff Goldblum Had A Jazz Band? Meet The Mildred Snitzer Orchestra

Jeff Goldblum - ALLROUNDERThe Grand Budapest Hotel New York Premiere at Alice Tully Hall in NYC - New York, New York, United States - Wednesday 26th February 2014

Jeff Goldblum
Jeff Goldblum

Emilie Livingston and Jeff Goldblum - ALLROUNDER2nd annual an Evening of Environmental Excellence Gala held at a private residence - Arrivals - Beverly Hills, California, United States - Tuesday 5th March 2013

Emilie Livingston and Jeff Goldblum
Jeff Goldblum and Emilie Livingston
Jeff Goldblum and Emilie Livingston

Jeff Goldblum - New York premiere of The Grand Budapest Hotel at the Alice Tully Hall - Outside Arrivals - New York City, New York, United States - Wednesday 26th February 2014

Jeff Goldblum
Jeff Goldblum
Jeff Goldblum
Jeff Goldblum

Jeff Goldblum - 64th Berlin International Film Festival - 'The Grand Budapest Hotel' Premiere - Berlin, Germany - Thursday 6th February 2014

Jeff Goldblum - 64th Berlin International Film Festival - The Grand Budapest Hotel - Photocall - Berlin, Germany - Thursday 6th February 2014

Jeff Goldblum
Jeff Goldblum
Jeff Goldblum
Jeff Goldblum
Jeff Goldblum

"Le Week-End" Is Warm, Honest And Clever And That's Just The Critics Talking


Jim Broadbent Lindsay Duncan Jeff Goldblum

Le week-end is sweet, it’s quirky and it has its token dose of snark – the perfect combination to warm those chilly autumn nights. To top it all off, this Jim Broadbent and Lindsay Duncan starrer is set in Paris, adding another dose of romance to the whole affair. The affair in question is a weekend getaway for an ageing couple, which leads them to reevaluate their relationship and their lives overall.

Watch the trailer below.

Continue reading: "Le Week-End" Is Warm, Honest And Clever And That's Just The Critics Talking

'Jurassic World' Is As Far As It Goes! No Real-Life Dinos, Says Scientist


Steven Spielberg Jeff Goldblum

For those of you who thought that Jurassic Park’s fiction could ever wake up one day and find itself fact will be disappointed. Just as the latest entry into the franchise is announced – Jurassic World – a scientist has burst a collective bubble that was swelling with the recent announcement.

Jurassic World

It re-enters the back of peoples’ minds every Christmas or Easter, when Jurassic Park reaches our tellyboxes. "Maybe…they could do that in real life. I mean, they can clone sheep now," people think. But science has an answer for you dreamers out there, and it’s no.

Continue reading: 'Jurassic World' Is As Far As It Goes! No Real-Life Dinos, Says Scientist

Living For 'Le Week-End' - Jim Broadbent And Lindsay Duncan Star [Trailer]


Jim Broadbent Lindsay Duncan Jeff Goldblum

We’ve seen screen-legends combine to bring us the other side of a ‘coming of age’ story before - The Best Exotic Marigold Hotel did it to some degree of success – and now we have Le Week-End, which see Jim Broadbent and Lindsay Duncan’s characters head to the city of love to see if theirs can be reignited.

Jim Broadbent and Lindsay DuncanJim Broadbent and Lindsay Duncan in le Week-end

The Guardian, on the strength of the film’s Toronto 2013 screening, certainly liked it, giving it four stars. “All three lead characters are brimful of insight, with Broadbent brilliant as a man berated by his wife, scorned by his employers, exploited by his son, and offered scant compensation from anyone,” says their review.

Continue reading: Living For 'Le Week-End' - Jim Broadbent And Lindsay Duncan Star [Trailer]

Le Week-End Trailer


Meg and Nick are a seemingly devoted couple who venture to the romantic city of Paris on their thirtieth wedding anniversary in the hope of rekindling old feelings from their honeymoon. They may claim to love each other, but things are far from perfect in their relationship as their routine lifestyles have caused a dramatic rift between them without them even noticing. Their weekend is tainted by frequent arguments, though always warmed by frequent displays of affection and childish exploits. However, when they bump into old American friend who invites them for dinner at his Parisian apartment, they start to feel depressed that their lives are several shades less colourful than his with his gorgeous pregnant wife, success in the city and an impressive book deal. Will this long-devoted couple find peace within themselves to be content with one another? Or will Paris cause them to finally drift apart?

Continue: Le Week-End Trailer

A Week In Movies: Neeson Is Taken Again, Statham Goes Dramatic, Depp Cuts His Hair


Liam Neeson Jeff Goldblum Bill Pullman Seth Rogen Johnny Depp Tom Cruise Ryan Gosling Paul Rudd Emile Hirsch Michael Fassbender

Taken Poster

The big news this week is that a reported $20 million paycheque has lured Liam Neeson back for a third Taken movie. There's no word yet on the plot, but does it really matter? Meanwhile, Jeff Goldblum and Bill Pullman will be back for Roland Emmerich's long-awaited sequel to his 1996 blockbuster Independence Day, although apparently Will Smith's character isn't in the script.

This week's top cinema releases include the animated sequel Despicable Me 2 and Jason Statham's dramatic thriller Hummingbird. which has been re-titled Redemption for its American release. Meanwhile, British audiences are catching up with Seth Rogen's A-list apocalyptic comedy This Is the End, while Americans have a chance to check out Gemma Arterton and Saoirse Ronan as rogue mother-daughter vampires in Byzantium.

Continue reading: A Week In Movies: Neeson Is Taken Again, Statham Goes Dramatic, Depp Cuts His Hair

Independence Day X 2 + (Jeff Goldblum + Bill Pullman) - Will Smith = Independence Day 2


Will Smith Jeff Goldblum Bill Pullman

It’s official Jeff Goldblum and Bill Pullman are back for the Independence Day Sequel – imaginatively named Independence Day 2. Will Smith, however, is too expensive, so he can’t come out to play.

Will SmithWill Smith and his son Jaden star in After Earth, which was so bad

Pullman played President Thomas J Whitmore, while Goldblum appeared as a geeky computer expert called David Levinson, and both characters will be returning to reprise those roles. Perhaps, with Smith rules out, Goldblum could prove to be an unlikely hero in this one. It might just not work though; Smith was a brilliant hero in the original 1996 film, and launched his Hollywood career off the back of it. So high was his launch, though, that his $50m 2-year deal request proved a little too steep.

Continue reading: Independence Day X 2 + (Jeff Goldblum + Bill Pullman) - Will Smith = Independence Day 2

Jurassic Park 3D Trailer


When John Hammond of genetic engineering company InGen manages to clone dinosaurs from prehistoric DNA on an island-turned-theme park, it didn't bode well for visitors. After his investors force him to enlist the help of two palaeontologists and a chaiotician to make sure that the park is safe enough to open to the public, things go badly wrong when a double-crossing InGen computer programmer attempts to steal dinosaur embryos for a rival company by deactivating the security system and releasing the dangerous creatures from their enclosures. The adventure becomes less of an exciting opportunity for exclusive access to new technology, and more of a deadly struggle to survive.

What's better than gigantic deadly dinos on cinema screen? Try gigantic deadly dinos in 3D! The triple Oscar winning 'Jurassic Park' is set to hit our screens again 20 years after it was first released. It was directed by Steven Spielberg ('Saving Private Ryan', 'Schindler's List', 'Jaws', 'E.T.') in 1993 after he adapted it from best-selling novelist Michael Crichton's book of the same name, with a screenplay co-written by Crichton and David Koepp ('Mission: Impossible', 'War of the Worlds', 'Angels & Demons'). It will arrive in 3D soon in the US on April 5th 2013.

Starring: Sam Neill, Laura Dern, Jeff Goldblum, Richard Attenborough, Bob Peck, Martin Ferrero, Joseph Mazzello, Ariana Richards, Samuel L. Jackson, BD Wong, Wayne Knight, Gerald R. Molen, Miguel Sandoval, Cameron Thor, Christopher John Fields,

Continue: Jurassic Park 3D Trailer

Video - Jeff Goldblum And A Friend Leaving Hugo's Restaurant


Actor Jeff Goldblum, best known for his role as Dr Ian Malcolm in the Jurassic Park films and his role as Detective Zach Nichols on the American crime drama "Law & Order: Criminal Intent", leaves Hugo's restaurant with a friend

Morning Glory Review


Very Good
A snappy script helps make this rather goofy comedy much more enjoyable than it should be. And it also helps that the film is extremely well-cast, and that it has some pointed things to say.

Becky (McAdams) is an ambitious young TV producer who has always dreamed of working for NBC's Today show. After being sacked from her job at a local New Jersey station, she finds work at low-rated network programme Daybreak. Sparky anchor Colleen (Keaton) gives Becky a run for her money in the energy stakes, and when Becky lands jaded veteran reporter Mike (Ford) as cohost, things start to get messy. Soon her boss (Goldblum) tells her that the show will be cancelled if ratings don't improve drastically. So Becky takes drastic action.

Continue reading: Morning Glory Review

The Switch Trailer


Kassie is ready to have a baby, the problem is she isn't in a relationship and doesn't plan on settling down with a certain someone anytime soon. After much deliberation she decides that she's going to find a sperm donor and raise the child on her own. To Kassie the idea is absolutely fine but her best friend Wally is, to say the least, a little dubious that it's a good idea. Kassie throws a party to celebrate her last night of drinking and un-motherhood and she invites all her friends including Wally but when he gets a little too drunk he accidentally spills the donors sample Wally goes to extreme measures to cover up the accident and replaces the specimen with some of his own.

Continue: The Switch Trailer

Adam Resurrected Review


Bad
If Adam Resurrected were any better a film, it would have the potential to be actively offensive, as opposed to merely tiresome and baffling. Between Jeff Goldblum's wildly over-mannered performance and the schlocky treatment of serious subject matter, it's hard to know whether to simply dismiss the film or be outraged by it. Dismissal is likely the better option.

The film is adapted from Yoram Kaniuk's controversial 1968 novel, which was one of the first works of literature to deal in a serious manner with the repercussions of the Holocaust. The controversy is not that surprising, given that it's about a German Jewish performer, Adam Stein (Goldblum), interred at a concentration camp where he entertains other prisoners to keep them docile on their way to the extermination chamber, where his family is sent while he fiddles away; not much noble uplift or moral condemnation to be seen. Stein, a clownish old cabaret emcee whose dizzying intellect matches his taste for mayhem, later ends up a madman in a fanciful high-tech asylum for survivors in the Israeli desert where he plays court jester to the other inmates and indulgent therapists. He also likes reenacting some of the worst aspects of his treatment in the camps, whether on his dusky-eyed nurse-lover or the newest patient, a young boy raised to believe he's a dog.

Continue reading: Adam Resurrected Review

Pittsburgh Review


Excellent
Singularly unique, Pittsburgh is one of the more enjoyable motion pictures I've come across in recent months. Apparently dumped to DVD (with a preview on Starz Cinema) without a theatrical run, the film is part documentary, part mockumentary, part improv comedy. The film has no screenwriting credit, but it does tell a story of sorts, involving Jeff Goldblum (as himself, as is everyone here) returning to his hometown of Pittsburgh for a two-week run of The Music Man, in which he will play the lead. This amuses, excites, and perplexes various people in his life.

Goldblum did indeed star in The Music Man in Pittsburgh, and he did go on late night TV with Conan and Kilborn to promote it. I presume he really is friends with Illieana Douglas and Ed Begley Jr., but I'm less clear if he's really wooing a girl in need of a green card and whether Moby's obsessed with amateur porn. Pittsburgh lives in a relatively thick line between reality and fantasy, but it never ceases to be funny.

Continue reading: Pittsburgh Review

Fay Grim Review


Weak
Roughly ten years after cementing his place as an offbeat indie favorite, Hal Hartley revisits the characters that put him there. His 1997 Henry Fool, a screenplay-award winner at Cannes, introduced us to lonely garbage man Simon Grim, his horny sister Fay, and the titular character that drastically changes their lives. Hartley brings them back with Fay Grim, but the "where are they now?" fun wears thin quickly.

Part of the problem is Hartley's distinct style, which, if you're a fan, you already know well. Characters often speak slowly, pausing pensively for dramatic or comedic effect. Conversations -- and camera angles -- are unexpectedly funny and skewed, dabbling in established genres. When this approach has purpose or emotion (as in Henry Fool), it works. When it runs in circles, as in the second-half of Fay Grim, it exists only for the "art" and can be annoying as hell.

Continue reading: Fay Grim Review

Man Of The Year Review


Bad
Like a politician riding the campaign trail, Barry Levinson's Man of the Year talks out of both sides of its mouth by promising one thing but delivering another. Ad materials suggest an irreverent Robin Williams comedy that aims to satirize our electoral process. Once that plot is established, though, Year converts into a low-level political potboiler that's scraped from the sides of John Grisham's circular file.

What's funny about this deceptive bait-and-switch is that Year rests on the shoulders of a character whose primary directive is to slice through the empty rhetoric that's clogging our branches of government. Talk show host Tom Dobbs (Williams) takes Washington bureaucrats to task on a nightly basis - the character is modeled after Daily Show host Jon Stewart. At the urging of his fed-up fan base, Dobbs tosses his hat into the presidential race and hits the campaign trail with his manager (Christopher Walken) and producer (Lewis Black) in tow.

Continue reading: Man Of The Year Review

Dallas 362 Review


Good
Scott Caan wrote and directed this film about, um, himself and his erstwhile brother Rusty (Shawn Hatosy), two lovable toughs/borderline losers determined to make something good of their lives. That is, if they can stop fighting in bars and working for the local bookie as enforcer muscle. The meandering film is well meaning but derivative of many twentysomething-ennui indies, though it's bolstered by a fun performance by Jeff Goldblum as a stoner shrink and Kelly Lynch as the boys' mom, caught topless (and in bed with Goldblum) in just about every other scene she's in.

Thank God It's Friday Review


Weak
As Oscar-winning films go, Thank God It's Friday is pretty much at the nadir. It's a quickie flick meant to take advantage of the disco fever of the late 1970s, and given that the entire film takes place inside a discotheque (or en route to one), it does exactly that.

The film pays much more attention to the music (The Commodores headline, Donna Summer croons "Last Dance," which is where the Oscar understandably landed for this film, than it does to characters or story. Well, there really is no story, just a bunch of scenes of people at the club for various reasons. Two underage girls want to compete in a dance competition there. A driver has The Commodores' instruments and needs to get to the show. A white-bread couple celebrates their fifth anniversary (despite club owner Jeff Goldblum hitting on the wife). Stop me if you can fill in the rest.

Continue reading: Thank God It's Friday Review

Auggie Rose Review


Very Good
Curious little movie. Jeff Goldblum's morose insurance salesman witnesses a shooting of an employee during the robbery of a deli and decides to look into the life of the man who ultimately dies into his eyes. Auggie Rose, it turns out, is an ex-con fresh out of 20 years in prison with no family ties -- only a pen-pal girl (Anne Heche) who is coming to meet him for the first time. Goldblum's John Nolan takes a giant leap and starts to assume Auggie's identity, slowly weaning himself from his rich guy trappings (and his own form of prison) as he becomes this down-on-his-luck individual. Laconic and contrived beyond belief, Auggie Rose is nonetheless a much better film than I ever expected it could be, largely thanks to Goldblum's prodigious acting chops. If anyone could make you feel the life of a rich insurance salesman is worse than that of a penniless ex-con, Goldblum can.

Continue reading: Auggie Rose Review

Hideaway Review


Bad
Let's get this straight. Hideaway is the worst movie I've seen in months. Watch Jeff Goldblum dance around for two hours trying to keep Aerosmith's favorite video girl, Alicia Silverstone, from getting whacked by the bad guy. Yawn. Only the heavy metal soundtrack is redeemable: it keeps the audience awake.

Holy Man Review


Terrible
Pop quiz. You're Eddie Murphy, a popular comedian who makes about a decade of bad movies. You then do a remake of a Jerry Lewis classic and you're back in the swing of things. People start to like you again. Why would you do Holy Man?

In this awful, Saturday Night Live sketch gone bad, Jeff Goldblum stars in a thankless role as an infomercial executive who needs to find good product or he'll be fired. He stumbles upon G (Murphy), a mysterious man in a white sheet who speaks eloquently about.... uh....stuff. Goldblum has the inevitable romance with co-worker Kelly Preston, who are about as compatible as Catherine Zeta-Jones and Walter Mathau.

Continue reading: Holy Man Review

Igby Goes Down Review


Very Good
2002 is the year of Kieran Culkin. After a rock-star performance in the one great film this year that everyone missed -- The Dangerous Lives of Altar Boys -- Kieran Culkin delivers another knockout performance as a rebel without a clue or a cause in Igby Goes Down.

Igby Goes Down tells the tale of one boy's rebellion against the 'old money' ways in which he was born. Igby Slocumb (Culkin) lives within a quirky family unit complete with a schizophrenic father (Bill Pullman) - whose last episode earned him a one-way ticket to the funny farm years back, a self-absorbed, Mommie Dearest of a mother (Susan Sarandon), and a repugnant Young Republican reptile of a brother (Ryan Phillippe). His constant attempts at searching out a better life away from his family's stifling dysfunction lead to a number of high school expulsions and an abnormal amount of prescription sedatives for his mother.

Continue reading: Igby Goes Down Review

The Big Chill Review


Excellent
Fear The Big Chill backlash. Now that knocking off the classic has become popular, with ensemble, one-house comedies being churned out faster than sequels to American Kickboxer, it's easy to forget the film that started it all. That would be a mistake. While the story doesn't carry as much grit as it did in 1983 -- surrogate pregnancy and drug use being the hot topics here -- it's still a lot of fun and it's the best example of The Ensemble as star that you'll find in American cinema. Still, if I hear "Joy to the World" one more time, I just might kill somebody...

Jurassic Park Review


Good

When John Hammond, the rich billionaire who creates Jurassic Park, says he "spared no expense," we might as well be listening to Steven Spielberg, the film's prolific director. Jurassic Park cost somewhere in the vicinity of $63 million to make but that seems like nothing compared to the return, which was only a hair under $400 million. This is when we really knew what Spielberg could do: He could make a blockbuster better than anyone in the world. Jurassic Park isn't his best film by a long shot, but its mesmerizing entertainment and proof that the man is the go-to guy for action and adventure.

The beginning sets the pace perfectly: While transporting a cloned dinosaur into the titular theme park, a worker is pulled into its cage and ravaged while the other workers prod the beast to no avail. It's the following lawsuit that makes the park's owner, John Hammond (Richard Attenborough), want to bring in married paleontologists Alan and Ellie (Sam Neill and Laura Dern), theorist Ian (Jeff Goldblum), and his lawyer Mr. Gennaro (Martin Ferrero) to consult and give the park their seal of approval. When they first arrive, they are amazed by the dinosaurs and charmed by Hammond, his money and his technology. They are also charmed by his grandchildren, Tim and Lex (Joseph Mazzello and Ariana Richards), who come right before the security breaks down. Soon enough, the dinosaurs are loose, eating humans (and each other) with rampant glee.

The main attractions, obviously, are the dinosaurs and the wizards at Stan Winston Studios and Industrial Light and Magic, who did the special and visual effects for the film. For the raptors, specifically, they give the creatures such a fluid range of motion that the carnality of their attacks gives off a vibrant feeling. Spielberg has a knack for mixing visual fireworks with a solid storyline, but he still has trouble with his characters and making them deeper than mere sketches of people. It's easy: Hammond is the rich guy who learns his lesson, Alan is the logical, surprisingly adept hero, Ellie is his equal but understands more emotional things, Ian is the comic relief, Lex and Tim are the innocents, and the lawyer is a meal. But none of these characters really go beyond these archetypes, although the actors try their hardest to give the lines depth (special kudos to Dern and Neill). David Koepp, assisted by Michael Crichton, has crafted a great story in his screenplay, but he never gives enough care to the details of the characters.

It's been argued by a lot of people that Spielberg is a hack; that he treats his controversial films (Schindler's List, Amistad) with the same do-anything rush of his action/adventure films (Minority Report, the Indiana Jones trilogy). Maybe they have a point, but there is no arguing that Spielberg is an important director and a potent storyteller. Jurassic Park serves as an example of his control of story and imagery but also shows off his lack of character development, which has only really been cured in Jaws, indisputably his best film. His next film, Munich, was written by Tony Kushner, the famed author of Angels in America, which might make for a deeper drama from Spielberg. Either way, I guarantee that the producers spared no expense.

Continue reading: Jurassic Park Review

The Life Aquatic With Steve Zissou Review


Very Good
In The Life Aquatic with Steve Zissou, one sees other actors besides Bill Murray - quite a lot of them, actually - but there are really no other performances to speak of. This is his movie, and everyone else, no matter how large a role they have, is really just a walk-on. Now, to your average filmgoer, this sounds like a fine thing, after all, one doesn't often say, "I would have liked that movie more if there'd been less Bill Murray." (Except Garfield.) Oddly enough, this film-long tribute to Murray, with a script lovingly crafted for his deadpan delivery by Wes Anderson (The Royal Tenenbaums) and Noah Baumbach (filmcritic.com favorite Kicking And Screaming), is replete with stabs of comedic genius but never quite takes off.

Murray ambles through his performance as oceanographer Steve Zissou, whose longtime partner was just eaten by a rare species of shark ("which may or may not exist") and is determined to set off on an expedition to find the shark and kill it. When asked what scientific purpose this would satisfy, Zissou gives an almost imperceptible shrug and says, "revenge." Much in the same way that Luke Wilson's Richie in The Royal Tenenbaums had long outlived his brief fame as tennis pro by the time the film started, in Life Aquatic, Zissou's best days are already behind him, and the film is littered with the detritus of his past glory, many of them '70s-style nostalgia items like a special edition tennis shoe or a pinball machine featuring his bearded visage. The funding for Zissou's increasingly poorly-received films is drying up, it looks like his wife is about to leave him, and there's a reporter nosing around asking painful questions. So Zissou's expedition - a half-assed, barely-planned affair - is much less a research trip than a has-been's last hurrah, a perpetually stoned Ahab hunting his white whale (or jaguar shark, in this case).

Continue reading: The Life Aquatic With Steve Zissou Review

Cats & Dogs Review


OK
I have officially reached my quota for the year of talking animal movies. Dr. Dolittle 2 pushed me to the edge, and the animatronic animal flick Cats & Dogs has pushed right over it, into a giddy oblivion where I now firmly believe purple dinosaurs can communicate with humans through song and dance.

Cats & Dogs is ridiculous and harmless, a Mission: Impossible for the animal world. For years, a secret high-tech espionage war has been waged between the feline and canine races, right under the noses of ignorant humans. The spark of this high-tech war came about as the result of the dog race overthrowing the then-dominating cat race during ancient Egyptian times (they even ruled the human race). Man's best friend re-established the humans as the dominant race and has protected that balance for years. And a breakthrough for dogs is approaching, as one human, Professor Brody (Jeff Goldblum), is on the verge of discovering an allergy vaccine which will enable all humans and dogs to co-exist in peace. The only problem is that the diabolic Mr. Tinkle (voiced by Sean Hayes), a furry white Persian with the attitude of Richard Grant's character from Hudson Hawk, and his small army of pesky felines have "cat-knapped" the family dog Buddy, who has been guarding the Professor and his family from the tuna-breathed fiends. The bodyguard job then falls on the shoulders of a Beagle pup named Lou (voiced by Toby Maguire) -- who is mistaken as a secret agent dog by an Anatolian Shepard named Butch (voiced by Alec Baldwin).

Continue reading: Cats & Dogs Review

The Lost World: Jurassic Park Review


Good
Well, it ain't Schindler's List.

With his highly anticipated Jurassic Park sequel, Steven Spielberg grubs through the filmmaking archives for every plot device, camera trick, and clichéd scene you can think of, and rolls it into one big mess. Only with dinosaurs. Lots of 'em!

Continue reading: The Lost World: Jurassic Park Review

Independence Day Review


Excellent
Independence Day marks the glorious realization of what, for me, has been a nearly 25 year wait. Countless prayers have gone unanswered, but on this day, I have finally witnessed on screen what I have only dreamt of all my life, for this film features the complete and total destruction of the city of Houston through the use of nuclear weapons, by the U.S. government's own hand!

But watching my home town be blown away is only one of the charms of ID4 (the film's hip moniker). First there's the War of the Worlds meets Star Wars meets The Right Stuff story, about a superior, marauding alien force threatening to annihilate the human race (and almost succeeding). And an all-star cast of freedom fighters (more on them later). Director Roland Emmerich, who redeems himself for the idiocy of Stargate, and who isn't afraid to kill off the good guys. Some dazzling visuals. Loud sound effects. Plus every Star Trek and X-Files fan in town in the audience. What more do you want?

Continue reading: Independence Day Review

The Adventures Of Buckaroo Banzai Across The 8th Dimension Review


Very Good
He's a rock star. He's a surgeon. He's a scientist who has completed the work of his father and has managed to travel through solid matter by punching into the 8th dimension in his rocket car.

He's Buckaroo Banzai, inhabited by the inimitable Peter Weller in a role that has granted him cult status among the geeks of the world. In this film (originally intended to be the first of a series but petering out after the debut), Banzai's trip into the 8th dimension sets off an intergalactic war of sorts, as a former interdimensional traveler (who came out wholly insane in the form of Lord John Whorfin (John Lithgow)) is trying to get Banzai's Oscillation Overthruster for himself, in order to bring a plague of evil aliens to destroy the earth. And of course there are good aliens that just won't have any of that -- and they're set to blow up the earth themselves if Whorfin succeeds.

Continue reading: The Adventures Of Buckaroo Banzai Across The 8th Dimension Review

Igby Goes Down Review


Excellent

Snarky, 17-year-old, silver-spoon-raised Igby Slocumb has been booted out of every prestigious (and not-so-prestigious) prep school on the East Coast -- and one military academy too. A bored, intelligent, resourceful and willful screw-up, he's almost proud of this record, even though he'd be the first to admit it's a cry for attention.

With a blue-blooded, pill-popping, self-absorbed mother (the hilariously dry Susan Sarandon) dying of breast cancer at home; a materialistically hollow, young Republican brother (a perfectly cast Ryan Phillippe) shining at Columbia University; and an asylum-committed, schizophrenic father (Bill Pullman) who haunts all his childhood memories, Igby (Kieran Culkin) seems to be the only Slocumb sagacious enough to emerge a better person from his sad yet comically dysfunctional family.

So despite the title of this tart black comedy -- "Igby Goes Down" -- its young hero is determined to stay on his feet. He's grown a sardonic, wry sense of humor (if not a tough skin) and become an expert at running away from home. Now, having escaped the limousine taking him to yet another upscale boarding school, he's on the loose in Manhattan, having resolved to get by on his own (or at least with the help of his mother's American Express card), even if he's not entirely sure what that entails.

Continue reading: Igby Goes Down Review

Overnight Review


Good

Like watching a train wreck in slow motion while an ignorant, arrogant engineer shovels more coal onto the fire, "Overnight" is a cautionary tale about the fickle nature of showbiz in which the victim is his own worst enemy. A documentary following the rapidly self-destructing, stalled-rocket career of Troy Duffy, a Boston bartender/bouncer who on a fluke landed a sweetheart writing-directing deal with Miramax Films in 1997, the film would be painful to watch if its subject weren't such an insufferable lunkheaded egomaniac.

The kind of boastful, booze-pounding tough guy who might get in bar fights for fun, Duffy sold Miramax's Harvey Weinstein on his vigilante-with-a-heart script called "The Boondock Saints," and was paid $300,000 up front. Then he was given a $15 million budget for the movie, on which he would have casting approval and final cut -- two creative controls Miramax rarely grants even to established cinematic geniuses. But as his friends film every moment for what Duffy clearly thinks will be a rise-to-glory making-of about his film and the illustrious career to come, this flash-in-the-pan refuses all advice and begins alienating powerful Hollywood players, burning bridges left and right.

Within weeks, no one at Miramax will take his calls. Over the next three years, Duffy clings desperately to his inflated sense of self-importance. "We have a deep cesspool of creativity here," insists the badly-in-need-of-a-dictionary wannabe filmmaker, whose self-proclaimed talent and vision are quite simply never on display. As for Miramax, "they're gonna pay dearly for saying no to us," Duffy barks, habitually swearing up a storm.

Continue reading: Overnight Review

Cats & Dogs Review


OK

Why do so many boy-and-his-dog type kiddie movies have a scene at the end in which it looks as if hero hound has died, only to have the critter spring back to life after half the kids in the audience have started crying?

Do moviemakers get some kind of twisted kick out of messing with the wee ones' heads?

No doubt it doesn't do any permanent damage, but this complaint occurred to me during just such a scene at the end of "Cats and Dogs," a fairly formulaic CGI-enhanced live-action adventure of slowly diminishing fun about a secret, millennia-long feline-canine war to take over the world.

Continue reading: Cats & Dogs Review

The Life Aquatic With Steve Zissou Review


Good

Steve Zissou is a washed-up Jacques Cousteau type suffering from an Ahab complex and middle-age ennui. His long-time first mate has just been eaten by the mysterious (and fictional) jaguar shark, and although his undersea documentaries haven't turned a profit in years, he's setting sail on one last low-budget oceanography adventure to make one last, rather out-of-character nature film -- about hunting down that shark if it's the last thing he does.

Another eccentric, buoyantly melancholy ensemble piece from wonderfully weird writer-director Wes Anderson ("Rushmore," "The Royal Tenenbaums"), "The Life Aquatic With Steve Zissou" is thick with the curious comedy of crew conflicts, researcher rivalries, laid-back shootouts with kidnapper pirates, and an outlandish underwater world teeming with colorfully imaginary stop-motion creatures created by Henry Selick ("The Nightmare Before Christmas").

But the movie's driving force is Anderson's signature sense of humor. The underlying (and unspoken) joke of this oddball farce is that it is transparently fake. Besides inventing an ocean full of fantastical life, the film is full of mischievous impossibilities, nonsense science, and cinematography designed to make it amusingly clear that the scenes onboard Zissou's run-down, retrofitted, World-War-II surplus sub-hunter ship are shot on a cut-away soundstage set.

Continue reading: The Life Aquatic With Steve Zissou Review

Jeff Goldblum

Jeff Goldblum Quick Links

News Pictures Video Film Footage Comments Quotes RSS
Advertisement

Jeff Goldblum

Date of birth

22nd October, 1952

Occupation

Actor

Sex

Male

Height

1.94


Advertisement
Advertisement

Jeff Goldblum Movies

Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom Trailer

Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom Trailer

The dinosaurs are under threat in the sequel to 2015’s 'Jurassic World', which reunites Bryce...

Thor: Ragnarok Movie Review

Thor: Ragnarok Movie Review

The most riotously enjoyable Marvel movie yet, this action epic benefits hugely from the decision...

Isle Of Dogs Trailer

Isle Of Dogs Trailer

Imagine a world without dogs. It hardly bears thinking about, but in this dystopian look...

Thor: Ragnarok Trailer

Thor: Ragnarok Trailer

With his friends and his hammer, Thor is virtually unbeatable by any creature in the...

Independence Day: Resurgence Movie Review

Independence Day: Resurgence Movie Review

Two decades is a long time to wait for a sequel, especially one starring much...

Independence Day: Resurgence - Teaser Trailer

Independence Day: Resurgence - Teaser Trailer

Everyone knows the tale of David Levinson and Captain Steven Hiller, the two men at...

Advertisement
Mortdecai Movie Review

Mortdecai Movie Review

Despite a superior cast and terrific-looking production values, this mystery romp is a misfire on...

The Grand Budapest Hotel - Featurettes Trailer

The Grand Budapest Hotel - Featurettes Trailer

While preparing to film 'The Grand Budapest Hotel', director Wes Anderson and company scouted for...

Mortdecai Trailer

Mortdecai Trailer

When a priceless painting is stolen with the presumable intention of being sold to fund...

Mortdecai Trailer

Mortdecai Trailer

Charlie Mortdecai may be rude, arrogant and distinctly unlikeable, but he's also a terribly rich...

Advertisement
Artists
Actors
    Filmmakers
      Artists
      Bands
        Musicians
          Artists
          Celebrities
             
              Artists
              Interviews
                musicians & bands in the news
                  actors & filmmakers in the news
                    celebrities in the news

                      Go Back in Time using our News archive to see what happened on a particular day in the past.