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Jennifer Lawrence, Jeff Bridges: The Biggest Video-Bomb In History?


Jennifer Lawrence Jeff Bridges

Jennifer Lawrence… pardon, Oscar winner Jennifer Lawrence got to meet Jeff Bridges and Comic-Con over the weekend and the result was curious. Ok, so the cutest video on the internet has to be either a sneezing panda or some puppu/kitten shenanigans of some sort, but this video definitely comes close.

Jennifer Lawrence, Cannes Film Festival
Apparently, Lawrence is a Jeff Bridges fan.

In the almost 4-minute-long clip, Lawrence and some of the cast of the Hunger Games get interviewed on the red carpet, but that’s not the main event.

Continue reading: Jennifer Lawrence, Jeff Bridges: The Biggest Video-Bomb In History?

US Box Office: The Conjuring Haunts R.I.P.D. During Its Opening Weekend


Vera Farmiga Patrick Wilson Lili Taylor Ron Livingston Jeff Bridges Ryan Reynolds Steve Carell Steve Coogan Miranda Cosgrove Benjamin Bratt Kristen Wiig Russell Brand

The Conjuring, opening this weekend, gained $41.5 million. Another lower budget film beat off the likes of R.I.P.D. which, according to reports, cost more than $130 million to make.

Vera FarmigaVera Farmiga at the premiere of Bates Motel, L.A. 

Warner Brother's haunted house horror, which stars Vera Farmiga (Bates Motel); Lili Taylor (Hemlock Grove); Patrick Wilson (Prometheus) and Ron Livingston (The Time Traveller's Wife), follows two paranormal investigators as they attempt to help The Warrens overcome a malign presence which lurks in their seemingly idyllic country house. 

Continue reading: US Box Office: The Conjuring Haunts R.I.P.D. During Its Opening Weekend

Video - Ryan Reynolds And Jeff Bridges Discuss Their Characters In 'R.I.P.D.' Featurette


Ryan Reynolds, Jeff Bridges and Marisa Miller open up about their upcoming new comedy 'R.I.P.D.' in this hilarious featurette. The movie is set to be released on July 19th 2013 in 3D.

Continue: Video - Ryan Reynolds And Jeff Bridges Discuss Their Characters In 'R.I.P.D.' Featurette

Jeff Bridges Living His Teenage Dream At Stagecoach Festival


Jeff Bridges

Sports star, rock star and astronaut - they’re the dreams, but hardly anyone gets to be even one of those. Unless you’re Jeff Bridges, that is. The actor has turned his hand to country music, and he’s rather good at it.

Sure, most of the fans gathering feverishly at Stagecoach festival were there to see the dude, made famous by The Big Lebowski. But it’s not as though Bridges’ music should be considered a novelty. At 63, he was inspired to pursue his artistic ambitions after playing a washed-up musician in 2009's Crazy Heart. Earlier this week, the star spoke to the Los Angeles Times about his motivation for focusing on music: “I thought, if I'm ever going to realize the teenage dream of having a band and going on the road and making records, now is the time,” he explained. “It's a bit surreal, doing this so late in life. The truth is, I've been doing it all along; it's just cresting now. I'm so glad the muscle hasn't atrophied. It's working well, I'm playing with my buddies, and we're all out there having a good time.”

So will Bridges give up on the on-screen career for a fully-fledged attempt at musical stardom? We hope not, not if his performance in True Grit was anything to go by. That’s not to say we don’t enjoy the tones of Bridges’ guitar, we just prefer his larger than life silver screen persona.

Continue reading: Jeff Bridges Living His Teenage Dream At Stagecoach Festival

A Week In Movies: Iron Man 3 Goes Global, Thor: The Dark World Trailer Strikes And Emma Roberts Stuns In Blue


Robert Downey Jr Gwyneth Paltrow Chris Hemsworth Tom Hiddleston Ryan Reynolds Jeff Bridges Toni Collette Steve Carell Sam Rockwell Robert Redford Emma Roberts James Franco

Iron Man 3

The big news in cinemas globally is the release of Iron Man 3, which doesn't open in the USA until next week. But audiences around the world are already watching Robert Downey Jr and Gwyneth Paltrow reprise their roles in the Marvel franchise, which will no doubt lead box office charts everywhere for a few weeks at least.

Meanwhile, we got our first glimpse of Iron Man's fellow Avenger Thor with the trailer for The Dark World, which opens late this summer. Chris Hemsworth is back as the Norse god, this time teaming up with his mischievous brother Loki (Tom Hiddleston) instead of fighting him. Natalie Portman is also back for what looks like a seriously epic blockbuster. 

Continue reading: A Week In Movies: Iron Man 3 Goes Global, Thor: The Dark World Trailer Strikes And Emma Roberts Stuns In Blue

RIPD, Jeff Bridges And Ryan Reynolds Play Ghost Cops: What's Not To Like? [Trailer & Pictures]


Jeff Bridges Ryan Reynolds Robert Schwentke Zach Galifianakis James Hong Marisa Miller

Jeff Bridges as Roy Pulsipher and Ryan Reynolds as Nick Walker in R.I.P.DJeff Bridges as Roy Pulsipher and Ryan Reynolds as Nick Walker in R.I.P.D

The trailer for R.I.P.D is finally here and it looks a riot. In case you haven't been following the production of this movie, it stars Ryan Reynolds and Jeff Bridges as deceased cops who work for the Rest in Peace Department, hunting down some scary looking ghoulish souls called 'Deados' who've escaped judgement.

But, there's a twist. Ryan's character Nick Walker is looking for the man who murdered him in a botched police operation. The trailer opens with Nick working for the real life police - he enters a warehouse looking for a criminal, though is quickly gunned down and sent to the R.I.P.D and told of his new role. There he meets Wild West lawman Roy Pulsipher (Bridges), his new partner who appears to channel his Oscar nominated role as Rooster Cogburn in True Grit. The souls begin to get out of control and gunfights and chaos ensue, with the partners trying to defend the world "one soul at a time." 

Continue reading: RIPD, Jeff Bridges And Ryan Reynolds Play Ghost Cops: What's Not To Like? [Trailer & Pictures]

Jeff Bridges Thursday 18th August 2011 signs copies of his debut album 'Jeff Bridges' at Barnes & Noble book store New York City, USA

Jeff Bridges
Jeff Bridges
Jeff Bridges
Jeff Bridges
Jeff Bridges
Jeff Bridges

Julianne Moore and Jeff Bridges - Julianne Moore and Jeff Bridges New York City, USA - 'The Big Lebowski' Blu-ray release at the Hammerstein Ballroom Thursday 1st January 1970

Julianne Moore and Jeff Bridges
Julianne Moore
Julianne Moore
Julianne Moore
Julianne Moore
Julianne Moore and John Goodman

Julianne Moore and Jeff Bridges - Julianne Moore, Jeff Bridges New York City, USA - 'The Big Lebowski' Blu-ray release at the Hammerstein Ballroom Thursday 1st January 1970

Julianne Moore and Jeff Bridges
T-bone Burnett, Jeff Bridges and Julianne Moore
Jeff Bridges, John Goodman and Julianne Moore
Jeff Bridges, John Goodman and Julianne Moore
T-bone Burnett, Jeff Bridges, John Goodman and Julianne Moore
Julianne Moore and Jeff Bridges

Jeff Bridges Tuesday 16th August 2011 'The Big Lebowski' Blu-ray release at the Hammerstein Ballroom New York City, USA

Jeff Bridges
John Goodman and Jeff Bridges
T-bone Burnett and Jeff Bridges
T-bone Burnett, Jeff Bridges and John Goodman
Julianne Moore and Jeff Bridges
T-bone Burnett and Jeff Bridges

Jeff Bridges Sunday 5th June 2011 arrives at Dulles International Airport Washington DC, USA

Jeff Bridges
Jeff Bridges
Jeff Bridges
Jeff Bridges
Jeff Bridges
Jeff Bridges

Jeff Bridges, Natalie Portman, Academy Of Motion Pictures And Sciences and Academy Awards - Jeff Bridges and Natalie Portman Los Angeles, California - 83rd Annual Academy Awards (Oscars) held at the Kodak Theatre - Press Room Sunday 27th February 2011

Jeff Bridges, Natalie Portman, Academy Of Motion Pictures And Sciences and Academy Awards
Jeff Bridges, Natalie Portman, Academy Of Motion Pictures And Sciences and Academy Awards
Jeff Bridges, Natalie Portman, Academy Of Motion Pictures And Sciences and Academy Awards

True Grit Review


Excellent
The Coen brothers return to the Charles Portis novel (rather than remaking the 1969 John Wayne movie) for this lean and riveting Western. It's a thoroughly involving story, with feisty characters and a wicked sense of humour.

Mattie Ross (Steinfeld) may be only 14 but she's determined to avenge the murder of her father by the outlaw Chaney (Brolin), who has fled into Indian territory. She tenaciously convinces gruff US Marshal Rooster Cogburn (Bridges) to take the case, rejecting the help of Texas Ranger LaBoeuf (Damon), who's been hunting Chaney for months. She also refuses to sit back and wait, riding out with Cogburn to chase Chaney down. Sure, this is no undertaking for a young girl, but Mattie may have more true grit than everyone else combined.

Continue reading: True Grit Review

Jeff Bridges - Monday 7th February 2011 at Academy Of Motion Pictures And Sciences Beverly Hills, California

Jeff Bridges
Jeff Bridges
Jeff Bridges
Jeff Bridges
Jeff Bridges and Hailee Steinfeld
Jeff Bridges

Jeff Bridges and Susan Geston - Jeff Bridges and Susan Geston Sunday 30th January 2011 at Screen Actors Guild Los Angeles, California

Jeff Bridges and Susan Geston
Jeff Bridges and Susan Geston

Jeff Bridges Saturday 15th January 2011 arrives at Chateau Marmont for a private party Los Angeles, California

Jeff Bridges
Jeff Bridges
Jeff Bridges
Jeff Bridges
Guest and Jeff Bridges
Jeff Bridges

Jeff Bridges and Palladium - Jeff Bridges and Guest Friday 14th January 2011 at Critics' Choice Awards Hollywood, California

Jeff Bridges and Palladium
Jeff Bridges and Palladium

Jeff Bridges and Beau Bridges - Jeff Bridges with his sister Cindy Bridges and his brother Beau Bridges Saturday 8th January 2011 at Paley Center for Media Los Angeles, California

Jeff Bridges and Beau Bridges
Beau Bridges and Jeff Bridges
Beau Bridges and Jeff Bridges
Jeff Bridges
Jeff Bridges and Beau Bridges
Hailee Steinfeld and Jeff Bridges

Tron: Legacy Review


OK
It's fairly safe to say that most of the fans of this long-awaited sequel won't have been born when the original Tron was released in 1982. With the derivative story and direction, the whizzy effects are its only calling card.

After his computer-genius father Flynn (Bridges) disappeared, Sam (Hedlund) grew up not wanting anything to do with Dad's business. But when the company shifts priorities, he takes action. This sparks a message from Flynn's business partner (Boxleitner) that sends Sam investigating the old arcade game Tron.

Suddenly, Sam is zapped into his father's cyberworld, where he has to battle to stay alive. And when he finds his now-old dad, he teams up with the hot Quorra (Wilde) to defeat the evil leader Clu (a digital young Bridges) and get home.

Continue reading: Tron: Legacy Review

Jeff Bridges - Jessie Bridges, Jeff Bridges with wife Susan Bridges New York City, USA - New York Premiere of 'True Grit' at the Clearview Cinemas Ziegfeld Theater. Tuesday 14th December 2010

Jeff Bridges
Jeff Bridges
Matt Damon, Hailee Steinfeld and Jeff Bridges
Jeff Bridges and Susan Geston
Jeff Bridges
Jeff Bridges

Jeff Bridges Saturday 11th December 2010 Los Angeles Premiere of Tron: Legacy held at the El Capitan Theatre Los Angeles, California

Jeff Bridges
Jeff Bridges
Jeff Bridges
Jeff Bridges
Jeff Bridges
Jeff Bridges

Alison Goldfrapp and Jeff Bridges - Sunday 5th December 2010 at Empire Leicester Square London, England

Alison Goldfrapp and Jeff Bridges

Olivia Wilde and Jeff Bridges - Olivia Wilde and Jeff Bridges Saturday 4th December 2010 at Empire Leicester Square London, England

Olivia Wilde and Jeff Bridges
Olivia Wilde and Jeff Bridges
Olivia Wilde and Jeff Bridges
Olivia Wilde and Jeff Bridges
Olivia Wilde and Jeff Bridges
Olivia Wilde and Jeff Bridges

Jeff Bridges - Sunday 5th December 2010 at Empire Leicester Square London, England

Jeff Bridges
Jeff Bridges
Olivia Wilde and Jeff Bridges
Jeff Bridges
Olivia Wilde and Jeff Bridges
Olivia Wilde and Jeff Bridges

True Grit Trailer


True Grit is a 1968 Western book by author Charles Portis, Ethan & Joel Coen now lend the story and re-work it into a film adaptation. They are not the first directors to turn this book into a film as it was also attempted by Henry Hathaway in 1969 and starred John Wayne.

Continue: True Grit Trailer

Jeff Bridges Thursday 22nd July 2010 Comic Con 2010 held at the San Diego Convention Center - Day 1 - Arrivals San Diego, California

Jeff Bridges
Jeff Bridges
Jeff Bridges
Jeff Bridges

Jeff Bridges - at Academy Of Motion Pictures And Sciences The 82nd Annual Academy Awards (Oscars)

Jeff Bridges

Jeff Bridges and Best Actor in a Leading Role - Jeff Bridges, Best Actor in a Leading Role Sunday 7th March 2010 at Academy Of Motion Pictures And Sciences Hollywood, California

Jeff Bridges and Best Actor In A Leading Role
Jeff Bridges and Best Actor In A Leading Role
Jeff Bridges and Best Actor In A Leading Role
Jeff Bridges and Best Actor In A Leading Role
Jeff Bridges and Best Actor In A Leading Role
Jeff Bridges and Best Actor In A Leading Role

Jeff Bridges and Susan Geston - Jeff Bridges and Susan Geston Sunday 7th March 2010 at Academy Of Motion Pictures And Sciences Hollywood, California

Jeff Bridges and Susan Geston
Jeff Bridges and Susan Geston

Jeff Bridges - Friday 5th March 2010 at Independent Spirit Awards Los Angeles, California

Jeff Bridges
Jeff Bridges
Jeff Bridges
Jeff Bridges
Jeff Bridges
Jeff Bridges

Jeff Bridges - Jeff Bridges and wife Susan Geston Friday 5th March 2010 at Independent Spirit Awards Los Angeles, California

Jeff Bridges
Jeff Bridges
Jeff Bridges
Jeff Bridges
Jeff Bridges
Jeff Bridges

Crazy Heart Review


Very Good
Like Tender Mercies, which won an Oscar for producer-costar Duvall, this film feels like the cherry on top of Jeff Bridges' fine career, giving him a terrific character who carries us through a fairly straightforward story of regret and redemption.

Bad Blake (Bridges) is a successful 57-year-old musician whose career and personal life have been derailed by alcoholism. Playing to bowling alleys and bars across New Mexico, he's interviewed by a journalist Jean (Gyllenhaal) and is surprised when a spark of attraction develops between them. His next stop is Phoenix, where he plays a gig with former band member Tommy Sweet (Farrell), who's now a mega-star but hasn't forgotten the debt he owes to Bad. The question is whether Bad can get himself together long enough to make either relationship work.

Continue reading: Crazy Heart Review

Jeff Bridges Tuesday 16th February 2010 AARP The Magazine's 9th Annual 'Movies For Grownups' Awards Gala held at the Beverly Wilshire Hotel Beverly Hills, California

Jeff Bridges
Jeff Bridges
Maggie Gyllenhaal and Jeff Bridges
Maggie Gyllenhaal and Jeff Bridges
Maggie Gyllenhaal and Jeff Bridges
Jeff Bridges

Jeff Bridges - Saturday 23rd January 2010 at Screen Actors Guild Los Angeles California

Jeff Bridges
Jeff Bridges
Jeff Bridges
Jeff Bridges
Jeff Bridges

Jeff Bridges and wife Susan Geston - Jeff Bridges & wife Susan Geston Saturday 23rd January 2010 at Screen Actors Guild Los Angeles, California

Jeff Bridges and Wife Susan Geston

The Men Who Stare At Goats Trailer


Watch the trailer for The Men Who Stare At Goats

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The Open Road Trailer


Watch the trailer for The Open Road

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The Last Picture Show Review


Extraordinary
Peter Bogdanovich's seminal The Last Picture Show is a world where the parental figures are never the real parents and almost everyone in plain view is still in some way a kid, regardless of the number of years they've lived. Set in some dustbin town on the edge of Texas, there's a smattering of heckles about an incapable football player in the film's initial measures that rightly anticipates both the town's maturity level and its gossipy nature. The only true adult's name -- Sam the Lion -- suggests mythical lore, if not majestic royalty.

The town where Sam (Ben Johnson) reigns is one of complete despair. He owns a pool hall where they sell candy and soda pop; he also owns the local movie theater where they play Father of the Bride, Sands of Iwo Jima, and John Ford movies. He looks after Sonny (Timothy Bottoms) and a retarded boy named Billie (Sam Bottoms, Tim's younger brother) who spends all his time uselessly sweeping the streets and watching the picture shows. There is one pretty girl, Jacey (Cybill Shepard), but she dates Sonny's dough-brained buddy Duane (Jeff Bridges). Jacey acts exactly like her mother (Ellen Burstyn) which is a dreadful fate in both cases. There's also Ruth Popper (an excellent Cloris Leachman), the PE teacher's wife who begins a quicksilver affair with Sonny.

Continue reading: The Last Picture Show Review

How To Lose Friends & Alienate People Review


Terrible
A comedy that misfires is not a catastrophe. After all, being unfunny is not the worst cinematic crime. Wasting the talents of Simon Pegg, however, surely mandates some kind of conference with the World Court in The Hague. From his cult TV series Spaced to the brilliance that is Shaun of the Dead and Hot Fuzz, this British actor is wit incarnate. But put him in projects outside his partners in satire (Edgar Wright and Nick Frost), and he flails like a fat boy running. Now comes How to Lose Friends and Alienate People, a worthless excuse for a laugh-a-thon that elicits more groans than giggles.

UK journalist Sidney Young (Pegg) is desperate to make it big. He will do anything to crash celebrity parties and get a scoop. His hijinks grab the attention of Sharps magazine publisher Clayton Harding (Jeff Bridges), and soon, the Brit finds himself in New York, working at the influential rag. Under the editorship of Lawrence Maddox (Danny Huston) and with the help of fellow reporter Alison Olsen (Kirsten Dunst) he soon discovers that a life covering the limelight isn't all its cracked up to be. As a matter of fact, it turns out that power-mad publicist Eleanor Johnson (Gillian Anderson) controls most of the magazine's celebrity content, and if Sidney wants to succeed -- and get to date her sexy star client Sophie Maes (Megan Fox) -- he better learn how to make her happy.

Continue reading: How To Lose Friends & Alienate People Review

The Amateurs Review


Very Good
Andy (Jeff Bridges) is, as they say, an idea man. He mopes and mopes until a brainstorm hits him and launches him out of the bar: Say, getting everyone in his small town to sell vitamins in a pyramid scheme, only to find that, if everyone's selling, no one's buying.

An idea man, you see.

Continue reading: The Amateurs Review

Iron Man Review


Very Good
The summer movie season arrives with a clang as Iron Man, a second-tier superhero from the mighty Marvel Comics universe, receives a first-rate film adaptation courtesy of director Jon Favreau (Elf, Zathura) and his perfectly-cast leading man, Robert Downey Jr.

A standard origin story, Iron Man stays faithful to its comic-book roots while making necessary upgrades that enhance the characters rich history. Favreau and his screenwriters follow shortcuts instituted by the superior Batman Begins and the inferior Spider-Man. The first half establishes our hero outside of his costume. The second half ramps up the action as it confronts a central villain and lays groundwork for potential sequels.

Continue reading: Iron Man Review

Surf's Up Review


Bad
The passionate pursuit of the perfect wave once inspired Bruce Brown to film the quintessential surfing documentary The Endless Summer. A loving ode to the unheralded beach-bum community, Brown's rambling tour of our planet's surfing hot spots took audiences on a permanent vacation when it opened in 1966.

Forty years later, the art of mastering tubular waves has inspired Surf's Up, an animated fish-out-of-water story that opens in the summer (great) but feels endless (groan).

Continue reading: Surf's Up Review

Surf's Up Trailer


Surf's Up is an animated comedy that delves behind the scenes of the high-octane world of competitive surfing. The film profiles teenage Rockhopper penguin Cody Maverick (Shia LaBeouf), an up-and-coming surfer, as he enters his first pro competition. Followed by a camera crew to document his experiences, Cody leaves his family and home in Shiverpool, Antarctica to travel to Pen Gu Island for the Big Z Memorial Surf Off. 

Continue: Surf's Up Trailer

Tideland Review


Terrible
It's not that there's necessarily anything wrong with a film that uses the dead gas escaping from a putrefying corpse for comic effect by making it sound like flatulence. There's nothing that says a film can't find the humor or humanity in a mentally damaged, possibly homicidal man befriending a lonely pre-teen girl of dubious sanity with whom he seems to have less-than-honorable intentions. And there's nothing wrong with having squirrels or severed dolls-heads speak to that same girl in lieu of human companionship. In short, it's not the dark subject matter of Terry Gilliam's Tideland that makes it so squirmingly unwatchable, it's his callous, giggly, and monstrously tone-deaf approach.Based on the novel by Mitch Cullen, Gilliam's film is a trippy fantasia that has the feeling of a Neil Gaiman pastiche of a junkie version of Alice in Wonderland as interpreted by Asia Argento and JT LeRoy -- only worse. The rather brilliantly naturalistic Jodelle Ferland wastes her talent playing Jeliza-Rose, a young girl of uncommonly optimistic outlook whose no-good parents (Jennifer Tilly and Jeff Bridges) are squabbling junkies who barely pay attention to her unless it's to help them shoot up. Not long into the film, Tilly fatally overdoses, sending Jeliza-Rose and her dad, Noah, on the road, as Noah is convinced in his heroin haze that the authorities will be after him. They end up at his old family farmhouse, boarded up and filled with the dusty memories of his long-dead mother. Then Noah ODs, too, leaving Jeliza-Rose on her own.She doesn't seem to mind, really, as it takes her awhile to even realize Noah is dead (in the meantime, she dresses his corpse in a wig and makeup). The world through Jeliza-Rose's eyes seems a pretty wonderful place, which she fills with imaginary voices and fantastical creations. The house itself is full of undiscovered treasure and surrounded by tall, wind-blown prairie grass. Meanwhile, just down the road is another house where a crazy woman in a black beekeepers' outfit (Janet McTeer) and her younger brother (Brendan Fletcher), the previously mentioned potential psychopath who initially comes off as an innocent but seems later to take a liking to Jeliza-Rose.Tideland is obviously a story packed full of material that's best handled delicately, what with the overall fog of insanity and the intimations of pedophilia. The problem here is that "delicate" is not a word one would ever use to describe Gilliam. A filmmaker with obvious and commendable visual talents (strangely in abeyance here), his storytelling taste has always vacillated between the sarcastic and the sentimental, with Tideland being a stomach-churning slurry of the two. In a story that calls for a light hand, Gilliam uses only the hammer, smacking home each and every scene with acting best described (with the exception of Ferland) as hysterical and a sense of humor that goes beyond the merely tasteless and verges on the deranged.There's always the chance that the whole film is a great put-on, a low-budget joke of the most gigantic order -- it does literally end, after all, with a train-wreck. Anything is possible. But that may not matter in the end, because if there was ever a film to end a career, Tideland is it.The tide is high and I'm movin' on.

Stick It Review


Weak
Just to set something straight: Bring It On is awesome. It's spectacular. But not in any way that implies actual quality, more for a spastic camp appeal that makes it a perfect Sunday afternoon tacos-and-ice-cream hangover cure accompaniment. However, we already have Bring It On, and it's on basic cable 17 times a day. We don't need another one, as it's already been brought.

And yet, Stick It.

Continue reading: Stick It Review

Seabiscuit Review


Extraordinary
Regular readers know (or are expected to know) that I enjoy only two sports: boxing and horse racing. Sadly, movies about these two subjects almost always suck, probably having something to do with the fact that most of boxing's competitors are egomaniacal sociopaths and that the typical horse race lasts for only two minutes.

And so we come to Seabiscuit, the true story of a small, unruly race horse of great breeding but poor disposition who found himself sold for scrap. Despite his attitude, he eventually became one of the greatest racers in history. (Believe it or not there's already been one Seabiscuit-inspired movie... the first one starring Shirley Temple.)

Continue reading: Seabiscuit Review

The Big Lebowski Review


Very Good
It bears repeating: Just because you happen to make an amazing, perfectly-crafted, wildly funny movie (Fargo), doesn't mean you can do whatever the hell you want in your follow-up and pass it off as art.

The Big Lebowski is the definitive answer to skeptics like me who wondered if Fargo was the fluke, and sort-of-okay flicks like The Hudsucker Proxy were more the norm for the Coen brothers. They undoubtedly are. In The Big Lebowski, the Coens had the world to play with as a palette. What they delivered is a wreck.

Continue reading: The Big Lebowski Review

Scenes Of The Crime Review


OK
Tip for those of you who want to make a gangster thriller flick: Don't set it largely in a van parked outside a dingy deli. Not really the glamor scene you're looking for, even if you do have perennial actor's actor Jeff Bridges trapped in back. While this cat and mouse game is woefully lacking in grandeur and carries few surprises in its plot, it's got a few goodish performances and soliloquys that make the two hours something better than truly awful.

Tron Review


Good
Back in 1982, special effects never seemed more assured. In 2000, they look downright hokey. Disneyfied. And in fact, for its 20th anniversary reissue on DVD, Tron still looks pretty darn goofy, though it's easy to appreciate it as a pioneering work of its era.

In the film, Jeff Bridges and Bruce Boxleitner are largely forgettable in flourescent paint and blacklighting as they stumble their way inside the computer to foil the evil Master Control Program. You see, in Tron, computer programs actually take on sentience, fighting for supremacy in the belly of the machine, often as gladiators. That might explain why my system crashes so much. Bridges, though, plays a human, digitized with a laser and inserted into the machine where he does battle with his own creations -- which ultimately turns out to be the biggest letdown, as the MCP is a big red cylinder with a face reminiscent of the Kool-Aid Man.

Continue reading: Tron Review

Arlington Road Review


Excellent
Thrillers can be really bad. When was the last time you saw a good thriller? It takes sound acting, a creative premise and most of all, suspense. Arlington Road, the new film starring Jeff Bridges and Tim Robbins, has a paranoia factor set in. There are many moments in this movie where I felt paranoid and creepy (and this was after I saw Eyes Wide Shut).

Jeff Bridges stars as Michael Faraday, and teacher at George Washington University who teaches a course on American Terrorism. Some people think that this was convenient given the plot of the film, but I think that it's a way of already instilling a sense of fear and uncertainty. In the first scene, Faraday rescues a young boy who had lit some fireworks and forgot to throw them. The boy is coincidentally the son of their neighbors, Oliver and Cheryl Lang (Tim Robbins and Joan Cusack, both extremely creepy and frightening). After some hunches about Oliver, Michael starts to do some investigating and what he turns up is not pretty.

Continue reading: Arlington Road Review

Simpatico Review


OK
I love a good thriller. And no one makes good thrillers any more. Enter Simpatico, with a cast boasting both Nick Nolte and Jeff Bridges, not to mention Albert Finney and Sharon Stone -- all set among the intrigue of a scandal involving horse racing, blackmail, and steamy sex. How could this miss?

By being as straightforward as, well, a horse race. It's just a big loop from start to finish. No real surprises along the way, just jockeying for position. Simpatico finishes right where it started, with a time of 106 minutes.

Continue reading: Simpatico Review

Winter Kills Review


Excellent
A real cult classic, this reimagining of the Kennedy assassination asks what might have gone down in an alternate and very similar universe. Based on the book by Manchurian Candidate author Richard Condon, the story gives us Nick Kegan (Jeff Bridges), the half-brother of a president assassinated 19 years earlier. Suddenly, evidence reveals there was more than one shooter that day (sound familiar?), sending him into a wild -- and often wildly funny -- hunt for his brother's actual killers. Dryly comedic, William Richert takes his directorial debut into impressive places -- and wow, check out that cast! Too bad it gets a little kooky in the end, but that doesn't detract much from a very fun movie.

The Muse Review


Excellent
Albert Brooks, who last gave us a wryly cynical meditation on mother-and-son relationships with Mother, turns now to a wryly cynical meditation on Hollywood and inspiration with the aptly titled The Muse.

Brooks plays Steven Phillips, a moderately successful Hollywood screenwriter who suddenly finds he's lost "his edge." In desperation he turns to friend Jack (Bridges), who introduces him to a girl named Sarah (Stone), whom Jack claims is a muse. Or rather, one of The Muses, a source of divine inspiration.

Continue reading: The Muse Review

The Contender Review


Bad
A day after The West Wing ruled the Emmy Awards, Rod Lurie's White House drama The Contender screened at the Boston Film Festival. With that kind of timing, comparisons are unavoidable. So with The Contender boasting an intriguing storyline (woman nominated for the Vice Presidency) and a top-line cast, how is it that I was pining for Martin Sheen by movie's end? I blame Lurie, for what I believe to be a true dud of the fall season.

Lurie is an L.A. film critic-turned-filmmaker who made his debut with last year's virtually unseen Deterrence, with Kevin Pollak as the President. Lurie's back to politics again, and this time it's Jeff Bridges as Commander-In-Chief, and he'd like to appoint Senator Laine Hanson (Joan Allen, in a role written especially for her) to the VP vacancy. Not so easy. The Senator has enemies, like Gary Oldman's Congressman Sheldon Runyon. His team digs up dirty pictures from Hanson's youth, and all hell breaks loose for the Senator.

Continue reading: The Contender Review

Lost In La Mancha Review


Very Good
It's always a struggle to get a film made, but few filmmakers have had to endure as much hardship in seeing their visions realized than Terry Gilliam. The Monty Python alum and director of such modern-day fantasy classics as Time Bandits, The Fisher King, and Twelve Monkeys, Gilliam is a director who finds order only in disorder, and anyone familiar with the unbelievably troubled productions of The Adventures of Baron von Munchausen and Brazil knows that he has often had to fight tooth and nail to protect his films from the studios financing them. So when word came out that Gilliam was ready to set sail on his dream project - a unique and expensive version of the Don Quixote legend entitled The Man Who Killed Don Quixote, to be filmed on location in Spain - it was, as usual, taken with a grain of salt. A Gilliam film, fans know, is not something to count on until the ads start running in the newspaper.

Well, the skeptics won this round. Beset by innumerable obstacles, The Man Who Killed Don Quixote never made it past the first few days of principal photography, and all that was left was Lost in La Mancha, Keith Fulton and Louis Pepe's alternately entertaining and depressing account of Gilliam's failed attempt to film his Quixote opus. The documentarians, who previously collaborated with Gilliam on The Hamster Factor and Other Tales of Twelve Monkeys - a behind-the-scenes look at the production of his 1995 Bruce Willis time-travel vehicle - were granted unprecedented access to the Quixote set. In a fortuitous decision for Fulton and Pepe, the duo chose to accompany Gilliam to Spain for preproduction, and were therefore privy to the tumultuous series of events that would eventually lead to the project's downfall.

Continue reading: Lost In La Mancha Review

The Morning After Review


Weak
Lifetime-achievement Oscar winner Sidney Lumet made a lot of great movies. He also made a whole lot of utter crap, and one of the cellar dwellers is this, The Morning After, a Jane Fonda vehicle that alternately insults you and makes no sense at all.

Lumet earns points for starting off with a bang. The movie opens with a haggard Fonda, her feathered hair coming across like a fright wig, rousing out of bed next to a man. She's a little disoriented... who is he? She turns to wake him up, only to find a steak knife jabbed in his chest. But she can't remember the night before! Did she kill the guy? Or is this the most retarded frame-up in the history of cinema?

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The American Success Company Review


Good
Extremely strange, The American Success Company gives us poor schlub Harry (Jeff Bridges), who's married to the boss's daughter but has absolutely no spine. Solution: He takes lessons from a hooker on how to be an asshole. And succeeds -- his marriage is reinvigorated and he turns things around at the office. He goes a little too far, of course, which is where the fun begins. Hard to find and more than a little confusing, this extremely weird entry from A Night in the Life of Jimmy Reardon director William Richert is worth a peek on late-night cable.

The Door In The Floor Review


Weak
Adapted from the first third of John Irving's sprawling novel A Widow For One Year, Tod Williams' The Door in the Floor is a high-minded piece of manipulative melodramatic bunk (with a horrible title) that rides a rising crest of pretension before splashing moviegoers down into a cold bath of self-indulgent faux tragedy. The story of an unhappy couple who welcome, with calamitous consequences, a young teen into their lives during a summer at their beachfront home, it's a disingenuous film that deals in the upper-class ennui and sorrow of The Ice Storm and Moonlight Mile, desperately clinging to an affected pose of photogenic misery but failing to even approximate reasonable human emotion or behavior.

Eccentric children's book author and womanizer Ted Cole (an adequately flaky Jeff Bridges) lost his two sons in a car accident years ago, and though he and his wife Marion (Kim Basinger) have relocated to a quaint New Hampshire town and attempted to fill the void in their lives by having daughter Ruth (Elle Fanning), they're still reeling from their family catastrophe and poised to separate. In a supremely idiotic decision, Ted hires Eddie (Jon Foster), a young student from Phillips Exeter Academy who looks just like his deceased oldest son, to be his assistant. However, the freewheeling writer - whose hipness is supposedly confirmed by his penchant for walking around naked in front of others, making erotic sketches of his mistress Mrs. Vaughn (Mimi Rogers), and listening to skanky hip-hop before watching Girls Gone Wild - makes a grave mistake by having the kid work during the day at his wife's nearby apartment. Eddie takes a masturbatory liking to Marion's bra and panties, and when he's caught in the act of self-gratification by the female object of his desire, she's all too willing to accommodate his Mrs. Robinson-patterned longings.

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Stay Hungry Review


Good
Jeff Bridges plays a wealthy real estate magnate tasked with evicting the employees of a local gym so he and his pals can raze the city block. This setup doesn't sound like much -- but Bob Rafelson's quirky production is difficult to resist, thanks to lively performances by Sally Field and a young Arnold Schwarzenegger.

Rafelson, who's lately been making films with titles like Tales of Erotica and Porn.com (the latter starring himself), knows how to put the right amount of oddball perversion into his movie. Bridges and Field (she's the manager of the gym) quickly start a torrid affair, which distracts from Bridges' ability to foreclose on the property. When Arnie appears, the setting morphs into the "Mr. Universe" competition as backdrop; the final scene of bodybuilders posing to homeless people on the street is priceless and worth the cost of a rental alone.

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White Squall Review


Good
You have to respect any movie with enough guts to use the word "squall" in its title. Brought to us by stellar director Ridley Scott (Blade Runner, Thelma & Louise), and pitched as "Dead Poets Society on a boat," White Squall ends up as a passable film, but won't being going down as one of the director's best productions, much less an equal to Poets.

White Squall is the true story of the Albatross, a ship carrying 13 boys as students of the Ocean Academy, a school-at-sea on which Christopher Sheldon (Jeff Bridges) is the captain. Setting sail in 1960 for a year-long voyage "half way around the world and back," the boys learn about discipline, facing ones fears, the joys of Danish schoolgirls, alcohol, venereal disease, and they occasionally even find some time to study.

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Tucker: The Man And His Dream Review


Excellent
Francis Ford Coppola's labor of love... about Preston Tucker's labor of love. Jeff Bridges stars as the charismatic man who tried to take on Detroit (and lost badly) by making his own line of safe, fast, stylish, and efficient automobiles in the 1940s. Detroit retaliated, landing Tucker in a fraud lawsuit, and this is his story. Tucker: The Man and His Dream is shot with Coppola's signature stylishness, aided by fine performances from Bridges, Joan Allen, and Martin Landau. A few impatient ones may get bored with the attention to detail that Coppola has infused in his film, but Bridges' riviting performance should keep the rest of you glued to your set and longing for one of his rocketship cars.

Heaven's Gate Review


Weak
Heaven's Gate is not, as its reputation suggests, the worst Hollywood movie ever made. Looked at in a certain light it even has some brilliance to it, and at stray moments you can even forget that Michael Cimino's film is now a three-and-a-half-hour metaphor for the hubris of ego and the dangers of not watching your budget. (Heaven's Gate had an original budget of $7.5 million, eventually cost a whopping $44 million, took in less than $2 million at the box office, financially kneecapped United Artists, and scotched Cimino's career as a director. The gory details, wonderfully told, are all in the book Final Cut, written by then-UA production exec Steven Bach.) Strip away the behind-the-scenes story, and Heaven's Gate is an enigma, as difficult to like as it is to dismiss. It is arrogant and it is beautiful. It is thematically clever and rhetorically dull. It is sensitive and it is condescending. It has enormous ambition and winds up with nothing to say. Eventually, it's just sadly exhausting.

One thing's for certain: Kris Kristofferson is blameless. A solid if not terribly nuanced actor, he plays James Averill, an upstanding marshal who arrives Johnson County, Wyoming to investigate rumors of turmoil there. It's worse than he imagines; as the station agent explains when Averill arrives, Johnson County (not Cimino) has become "the asshole of creation," thanks to ongoing bloodshed between wealthy WASP landowners and the immigrant settlers who try to work their small parcels of land. The landowners are led by the obscenely amoral Frank Canton (Sam Waterston, razor-sharp), who draws up a "death list" of 125 Johnson County residents who are legally approved to be killed under false accusations of thievery.

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King Kong (1976) Review


Terrible
Not even Charles Grodin, in his campiest, hammiest role of all time -- if not the campiest, hammiest role of all time -- can salvage this remake of the 1933 classic beyond one-starsville. This is frankly one of the worst films ever made, a useless and unwanted recreation of the past. Kong is actually a man in a monkey suit, smashing up miniature sets. Jeff Bridges' beard reminds you of a Brillo pad. Jessica Lange's outfits remind you of a hooker's (and of course, she falls in love with the magilla). It's over two hours long and when it isn't wholly laughable, it's utterly boring. And who, when on the run from a giant ape marauding New York City, drops into a bar for a drink?

Hearts Of The West Review


Very Good
An Iowa farmboy (Jeff Bridges) heads to Hollywood -- not to become a movie star, but to "attend" a correspondence school for writers. Perennially unclear on the concept, he ends up in the movies anyway, playing a stuntman and cowboy in Western genre pictures while trying to make it as a writer of "western prose." Very, very strange and self-referential, a really unique piece of cinema, though it tends to bog down after the umpteenth scene exposes Bridges' bumpkin-ness.

Starman Review


Very Good
Jeff Bridges plays a language-challenged alien who crash lands on earth in one of John Carpenter's best films -- not that that's saying much. While he drags Karen Allen (whose dead husband he has taken the form of) along on his quest to get back into space (because he can't drive, he needs the girl) while the feds try to hunt him down. What follows is one wacky road trip... but will he make it? In my book, you never bet against the alien (unless, of course, he's a bad alien).

K-Pax Review


OK

Quick, somebody give Kevin Spacey a bad guy role before he becomes as bland as Harrison Ford!

Just two years ago Spacey the Great was at the apex of his craft, unwrapping layers and layers of psychological subterfuge in "American Beauty" as a fettered suburban father having a volcanic eruption of a mid-life crisis. The man could project volumes of personality and complexity with the subtlest of glances and garner empathy even for his characters' ignominious acts.

But recently Spacey has stopped stretching as an actor, taking tepid, compassionate roles that come to rely on trademark tics he's developed. That curious puppy head tilt he once employed so deceptively in "The Usual Suspects" is one. His soft, lilting speech patterns that imply trustworthy gentleness is another.

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The Contender Review


Weak

Writer-director Rod Lurie is to political thriller cinema what Jackie Collins is to romance novels: high-gloss trash. The difference is that Lurie takes himself seriously.

Earlier this year his preposterous nuclear countdown yarn "Deterrence" was released after sitting on a shelf for two years. It starred Kevin Pollack as a US president snowed in at a Colorado greasy spoon getting unsolicited advice from a peanut gallery of patrons as Saddam Hussein's son revealed a secret nuclear arsenal pointed at our shores. Even more ridiculous than the plot was the "just kidding" manner in which it concludes.

Now comes "The Contender," a lurid yet didactic gavel-to-gavel drama about a vice presidential appointee embroiled in a sex scandal.

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Seabiscuit Review


Very Good

Making a genuinely stirring, unabashedly all-American feel-good movie -- the kind that makes you want to stand up and cheer -- has to be one of the most difficult, precision tasks in modern cinema. But writer-director Gary Ross beautifully sidesteps contemporary cynicism in "Seabiscuit," a film that invokes the warm, gratifying, can-do spirit of the uplifting films that once helped people forget the Great Depression two hours at a time.

The miracle success story of a too-small steed and his too-large jockey who together came to dominate and popularize horse racing in the late 1930s, the film is a metaphor for the underdog hope of the era that it captures so transportingly.

Adapted by Ross ("Pleasantville") from the acclaimed book by Laura Hillenbrand, the picture gets off to a unconventional start with a rambling 20-minute prologue -- narrated by David McCullough, the compassionate voice of Ken Burns' PBS documentaries -- that gallops through both general history (the Model T Ford, the stock market crash, prohibition) and detailed backstory (early owners deemed Seabiscuit too diminutive, lazy and willful to be a champion) while trying to look like it's trotting along at a laid-back canter.

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Jeff Bridges

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Jeff Bridges

Date of birth

4th December, 1949

Occupation

Actor

Sex

Male

Height

1.85






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Jeff Bridges Movies

Kingsman: The Golden Circle Movie Review

Kingsman: The Golden Circle Movie Review

Two years ago, Kingsman: The Secret Service seemed to come out of nowhere, ruffling feathers...

The Only Living Boy In New York [2017] Trailer

The Only Living Boy In New York [2017] Trailer

Thomas is feeling disillusioned by the bright city lights of New York following his college...

Kingsman: The Golden Circle Trailer

Kingsman: The Golden Circle Trailer

For those who knew him, Gary Unwin (better known as Eggsy to his friends), was...

Hell or High Water Movie Review

Hell or High Water Movie Review

Sicario screenwriter Taylor Sheridan delivers another fiercely intelligent, engaging story that maintains high suspense while...

Hell Or High Water Trailer

Hell Or High Water Trailer

Hell or High Water is an American heist crime film which follows the journey of...

The Little Prince Trailer

The Little Prince Trailer

A Little Girl's Mother has high expectations of her daughter, given her own career success,...

The Giver Movie Review

The Giver Movie Review

Yet another teen sci-fi adventure, this movie may be sharply well-made but it struggles to...

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The Giver Trailer

The Giver Trailer

Author Lois Lowry talks about her dystopian sci-fi book 'The Giver' in a featurette ahead...

The Giver Trailer

The Giver Trailer

Jonas is a young man who lives in a community where everybody is the same....

R.I.P.D. Movie Review

R.I.P.D. Movie Review

The ingredients are all here, but this mash-up of Ghost with Men in Black is...

Seventh Son Trailer

Seventh Son Trailer

John Gregory is a Spook charged with ridding the country of witches, beasts and malevolent...

R.I.P.D Trailer

R.I.P.D Trailer

Nick Walker was a promising SWAT officer before getting brutally killed in a police raid....

Finding North Trailer

Finding North Trailer

More than thirty nine million people in the U.S. - one in four of them...

True Grit Movie Review

True Grit Movie Review

The Coen brothers return to the Charles Portis novel (rather than remaking the 1969 John...

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