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67th Cannes Film Festival - Grace De Monaco - Photocall

Jeanne Balibar - 67th Cannes Film Festival - Grace de Monaco - Photocall - Cannes, France, United Kingdom - Wednesday 14th May 2014

Jeanne Balibar
Jeanne Balibar, Tim Roth, Olivier Dahan, Nicole Kidman and Paz Vega
Nicole Kidman, Jeanne Balibar, Tim Roth, Olivier Dahan, Pierre-ange Le Pogam and Paz Vega
Jeanne Balibar, Tim Roth, Olivier Dahan, Nicole Kidman and Paz Vega
Jeanne Balibar, Tim Roth, Olivier Dahan, Nicole Kidman and Paz Vega
Jeanne Balibar, Tim Roth, Olivier Dahan, Nicole Kidman and Paz Vega

Grace of Monaco Trailer


Grace Kelly is one of the most famous and most beloved Hollywood actresses in the world having won an Academy Award and two Golden Globes among others, and having starred in some of the most exciting films of the fifties. In 1955, her life changes dramatically when she catches the eye of the charming Prince Rainier III of Monaco who is on the lookout for the perfect wife. After three days of meeting, wedding plans begin and the high profile of such an event forces Grace to give up acting. Their marriage is about to be seriously tested, however, as Grace is offered a new screen role and she is itching to get back in front of the cameras. Unfortunately for her, nobody is in agreement with her continuing in film as a bad role could mar her royal reputation.

'Grace Of Monaco' is the dramatic onscreen biography of actress-turned-princess Grace Kelly, who was well-known for appearing in several of Alfred Hitchcock's films. It has been directed by the BAFTA nominated Olivier Dahan ('La Vie en Rose', 'Ghost River', 'Crimson Rivers 2') and written by Arash Amel ('The Expatriate'). The film is set to be released in the UK on June 6th 2014.

Click here to read Grace of Monaco movie review

Grace Of Monaco - Teaser Trailer


Grace Kelly is one of the most loved women of the past 100 years. The former Hollywood star was a favourite of the silver screen, but that was only really the beginning of her journey. When Grace Kelly fell in love with Prince Rainier III of Monaco, her personal life turned into a story that could rival that of a classic fairy tale. 

Though not from royal stock, Grace is to many their favourite royal to have lived; beauty, elegance and a gentle and nurturing nature only added to the appeal of Grace throughout the world. 

Nicole Kidman now takes on one of her most difficult roles to date and plays the much loved actress. Set in the 1960's whilst her husband, Prince Rainier III of Monaco, faced invasion by the French over tax disputes, the princess was also facing one of the most turbulent times of her life. Grace of Monaco was directed by Oscar winner Olivier Dahan (La Vie En Rose) and written by relative newcomer Arash Amel.

A Town Called Panic [panique Au Village] Review


Good
Extremely silly and often very funny too, this quirky stop-animated romp might have been better as a half-hour short, because there's not really much to it.

But it does manage to keep us chuckling with a continual stream of throwaway gags.

Cowboy and Indian (Aubier and Ellison) are like bickering kids in the home they share with Horse (Patar). Their neighbours Steven and Janine (Poelvoorde and Dumont) are highly strung but loyal friends, and they get rather annoyed when Cowboy and Indian accidentally order 50 million bricks to build a barbecue for Horse's birthday. Then the house walls start disappearing, and the culprit seems to be a team of underwater thieves. So Cowboy, Indian and Horse head off to stop them, ending up at one point inside a gigantic mechanical penguin on the North Pole.

Continue reading: A Town Called Panic [panique Au Village] Review

The Duchess Of Langeais Review


Excellent
It's no mystery that men and women do unconscionable things in the name of love, but the way French-new-waver Jacques Rivette plays it in his adaptation of Balzac's Don't Touch the Axe, you would think it was an epidemic.

Titled The Duchess of Langeais, Rivette's Restoration anti-romance takes the structure of a courtship between General Montriveau (Guillaume Depardieu), a celebrated war hero, and Antoinette (the astounding Jeanne Balibar), the titular married coquette, in the early 19th-century. At a ball in the upper echelons of French society, Antoinette becomes intrigued by the stoic Montriveau even before she meets him. Despite his lack of game, the general entices the married duchess with stories of his wartime campaigns. A student of Bonaparte, Montriveau becomes infatuated with Antoinette, who, in turn, begins to strategically toy with her soldier-in-waiting.

Continue reading: The Duchess Of Langeais Review

Clean Review


Grim

There is one scene in Clean that sticks out to me. A supremely-groggy Nick Nolte sits at a small fast food joint and gets a small salad and water while Maggie Cheung (playing his widowed daughter-in-law) goes up to the counter and orders a monster burger, french fries, and onion rings with a large coke. It's her first real meal since getting out of prison and it's his first meal with her for god knows how long. There's a lot of symbolism, even though it's simple, being used in the scene, and it gives depth to a complicated relationship (everyone thinks she Courtney-Loved her rocker boyfriend). How did director Olivier Assayas, a seasoned pro, allow this to be one of the scant few scenes that hold any real fascination? Furthermore, how did he allow himself to write something so damn drab and insipid?

Emily (Cheung) spends the first 15 minutes of the film being the annoying Yoko to Lee (Nick Cave dead ringer and cohort James Johnston), an aging rocker trying to get a deal for his anthology. She gets nabbed for heroin possession just when she finds Lee's body but is saved by Lee's manager. Out of jail after a quick stint, she meets with Albrecht (Nolte), her father-in-law who has been raising her son Jay with his wife. It's apparent to all involved (besides Jay) that Emily needs to get clean, get a job, and take custody of her child. The journey is held up by a brief stint in Paris where she still takes pills, gets fired from a job and finally begins to detox after her musician friend Tricky (playing himself) ignores her requests for help with the custody issue.

Continue reading: Clean Review

Code 46 Review


Weak
Meant to appeal to romantics and political flunkies, Michael Winterbottom's near-future allegory Code 46 is a well-made hodgepodge of Greek myth and think tank reveries. Told in his usual assured observational style, Code 46 is a marvel to look at: beautifully photographed in metropolis cities in the middle of the desert (labeled Seattle and Shanghai) and well acted by Tim Robbins and Samantha Morton. But what it has in sensual ambiance, it lacks in cohesiveness.

The plot is dippy melodrama cloaked in politically charged keywords: corporate entities, genetic coding, the Haves and the Have Nots, multicultural whitewashing, language barriers, secret passports, checkpoints, homeland security. It's charged material, but Winterbottom transforms it into so much white noise. That's all right -- it provides a sheen that's nice to look at, and the keyword dialogue takes on a musicality when spoken by detective William Geld (Tim Robbins) and suspect Maria Gonzalez (Samantha Morton). But it's all a smokescreen meant to disguise a story about love found, love lost, and a tragic denouement made-to-order from the Oedipus legend.

Continue reading: Code 46 Review

Sade Review


Weak
It would be hard for anyone to follow the critically acclaimed Quills, a vibrant portrayal of the Marquis de Sade, brilliantly coming alive through the talents of Geoffrey Rush. As a point of interest, the recently released Sade was actually made in the same year (2000). Having another strike against it for being foreign with subtitles, it had to take its time coming over to the United States. Being based on a similar subject, and created at the same time, it's nearly impossible to discuss without some sort of comparison.

This Sade (Daniel Auteuil) is no less seductively charismatic than Rush was, but he has less to do, as Sade chooses to focus more attention on the cultural climate than any specific, provocative interaction between characters. Rush was allowed more leeway to display range from torment to arrogance while Auteuil's Sade is a bit too impervious to his surroundings. What they do both achieve is providing an easy attraction. Neither have the stereotypically sexual physique the average woman clambers for, but their wit and intelligence are arousing. The acting isn't necessarily better in the English counterpart, but there is more weight given to individual motivation so that you're more attuned to personal struggles in the progressively oppressive Napoleonic era.

Continue reading: Sade Review

Va Savoir Review


Weak
Only the French could make a romantic comedy that clocks in at more than 2 1/2 hours in length. And of course, it wouldn't have much of a plot, either. This wafer-thin production, reminiscent of a really long Oscar Wilde play, Starring Jeanne Balibar (the poor man's Audrey Tautou), the movie is a hodgepodge of love triangles and petty theft, some of which amuses, but not for long enough to keep this critic's interest over its full running time. A curiosity that's easily forgettable.

Code 46 Review


OK
IN THE MEANTIME...

Here's the plot:

Continue reading: Code 46 Review

Va Savoir (Who Knows?) Review


OK

Interlocking romantic misadventures beget both amusement and broken hearts in "Va Savior," a City of Lights charmer with a semi-serious edge and several superb performances.

Directed by Jaques Rivette ("The Gang of Four"), the film's affairs are set in motion by the arrival of an Italian theatre company in Paris to put on a production of Luigi Pirandello's "As You Desire Me" (which plays to half-full houses). The star of the show is 30-something Camille (Jeanne Balibar), a French actress who left Paris three years ago after a bad breakup with her pretentious professor boyfriend Pierre (Jaques Bonnaffe).

Since then, Camille has become half-heartedly involved with her director and co-star (Sergio Castellitto), a middle-aged litterateur, while Pierre has married a beautiful ballet teacher (Marianne Basler). But now in the same city again, they seem self-destructively unable to resist each other's gravity. Camille doesn't want Pierre back, but needing an ego boost, she wants to gauge his interest in her -- which quickly drives him to obsessive behavior.

Continue reading: Va Savoir (Who Knows?) Review

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