Jean Smart

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Jean Smart at FX Upfront 2017 held at SVA Theater - New York, United States - Thursday 6th April 2017

Jean Smart

Jean Smart at the Film Premiere of Beauty and The Beast - Los Angeles, California, United States - Friday 3rd March 2017

Jean Smart
Jean Smart

The Accountant Review

OK

While this slick dramatic thriller plays with some intriguing ideas and themes, it never actually breaks the surface, relying on silly plotting and simplistic moralising. It also uses autism as little more than a plot point. Still, it's sharply shot and edited to create plenty of interest, with comical asides and some intense action. So it's entertaining even if it's both preposterous and shallow.

It centres on Christian (Ben Affleck), a mild-mannered autistic accountant with a big secret: he's not only cooking the books for top gangsters around the world, but he's also an efficient killer. In his day job, he's hired by Lamar (John Lithgow) and his sister Rita (Smart) to locate an anomaly in their robotics company's books. Working with company accountant Dana (Anna Kendrick), Christian crunches the numbers and finds more than anyone expected. Meanwhile, Federal Agent Ray (J.K. Simmons) wants catch this mythical mob accountant-killer before he retires, so he coerces analyst Marybeth (Cynthia Addai-Robinson) into tracking him down. But just as they close in on Christian, so does hyperactive hitman Brax (Jon Bernthal).

The script by Bill Dubuque (The Judge) never even remotely holds water. Christian's autism provides some intriguing flashbacks, which build throughout the movie to a climactic moment, as his militaristic father cruelly treats his condition by sending him to Karate Kid-style training in Indonesia with his silently annoyed little brother. Where a real autistic child would revert into the horror of all of that, Christian emerges as adeptly skilled at engaging with everyone he meets and also able to fight more efficiently than experienced military commandos, whom he kills by the dozen as Brax and his army surround him. No, it makes absolutely no sense, but as a movie it's a rather amusing waste of time.

Continue reading: The Accountant Review

Dan Stevens To Star In 'X-Men' Spin-Off Series 'Legion'


Dan Stevens Aubrey Plaza Jean Smart X-Men

Former ‘Downton Abbey’ star Dan Stevens has landed the lead role in 'Legion', an upcoming television series based on the X-Men franchise. The eight-part FX drama is set to debut in early 2017 and will also star Aubrey Plaza, Jean Smart and Rachel Keller.

Continue reading: Dan Stevens To Star In 'X-Men' Spin-Off Series 'Legion'

Jean Smart - 21st Annual Critics' Choice Awards - Arrivals at Barker Hangar, Critics' Choice Awards - Santa Monica, California, United States - Sunday 17th January 2016

Jean Smart
Jean Smart
Jean Smart
Jean Smart
Jean Smart
Jean Smart

Hope Springs Review


Very Good
The trailers for this film are misleading, promising raucous comedy from the director of The Devil Wears Prada. But this is actually a resonant emotional drama seasoned with earthy humour. Yes, there are funny moments, but don't go in expecting full-on hilarity. It's grounded by terrific performances from Streep and Jones as a couple who, after 31 years of marriage, have lost that spark of romance. This is a pretty serious theme for a movie, and the film takes a straight-on look at the issue.

The story starts when Kay (Streep) finally refuses to accept her dried-up marriage to Arnold (Jones), who can't see any reason to change things. She enrols them in an intensive counselling session in Hope Springs, Maine, with a well-known therapist (Carell), and after initially refusing to go, Arnold tags along. Their sessions immediately hone in on their nonexistent sex life, which causes both Kay and Arnold to squirm in their seats (and provides most of the laughs for the audience). And their small-step exercises aren't exactly a roaring success. But Kay is determined that she wants a real relationship or nothing at all.

Continue reading: Hope Springs Review

Hope Springs Trailer


After 31 years of marriage, Kay is starting to feel disheartened by the lack of a spark between her and her husband Arnold. Desperate for romance and intimacy again, Kay searches out a well-known specialist in marriage counselling who she arranges to visit to enrol in one week of therapy sessions in order to rekindle their relationship. She drags a reluctant Arnold on a plane to the town of Great Hope Springs for the counselling that will prove either futile or life-changing; it certainly doesn't look like an easy task what with the couple being faced with their sexual reservations and, conversely, each other's illicit fantasies.

Continue: Hope Springs Trailer

Guests and Jean Smart Friday 3rd December 2010 GLAAD Celebrates 25 Years of LGBT Images in the media held at The Harmony Gold Theatre West Hollywood, California

Guests and Jean Smart
Jean Smart
Jean Smart
Jean Smart
Jean Smart
Jean Smart

Life As We Know It Trailer


Being named a godparent is truly a remarkable thing, when Holly and Eric are named the godparents of their best friends daughter, they are more than happy to accept, though the godparents aren't exactly friends, they do have a mutual love for Sophie. But when an unfortunate accident kills both Sophie's parents both Holly and Eric are named as her guardians. They must put their differences aside and get along for the sake of the little girl who needs some stability in her life. Both parties seems to have a busy social and work schedule but they must both make sacrifices and find some common ground for the sake of Sophie and her parents wishes.

Continue: Life As We Know It Trailer

Youth In Revolt Review


Weak
Maybe this would work if you saw it before any other Michael Cera movies. Or any other quirky, over-written rom-coms. But after all that have gone before, this feels strangely awkward and unconvincing. And rather insufferably smug.

Nick Twisp (Cera) is a 16-year-old who feels out of sync with the world. He has a summer job in a caravan park, where he instantly falls in love with Sheeni (Doubleday), the fiercely protected daughter of religious nutcases (Walsh and Place). Sheeni is like a female version of him, only sexy and smarter, and he creates an imaginary alter ego named Francois Dillinger to give him the confidence to seduce her. But of course things go wrong from the start.

Continue reading: Youth In Revolt Review

Jean Smart Saturday 12th May 2007 Viewpoint School Fundraiser - Arrivals held at the Beverly Hilton California, USA

Jean Smart

The Kid (2000) Review


Excellent
Remorse is a dangerous thing in the mind of a man. It can hold a person down, quell his dreams, suffocate innocence, and convert people into intolerable beasts. People often think that if they could go back in time and reverse the wrongs done to them, a great weight would be somehow lifted from their shoulders. Beat up that bully that destroyed your self-esteem, kiss the girl you were in love with, stand up to the father that used you for a whipping post. These memories haunt the minds of individuals all around us like the ghosts of the Winchester Mansion.

What if you really had the chance to change all of that? What if you could talk to yourself when you were only eight years old and explain how to take a stand for yourself, give the younger you understanding of why dad is so angry at the world, and give yourself hope for retaining individuality in a sea of conformity. In the new Disney film The Kid Russ Duritz gets that once in a lifetime chance.

Continue reading: The Kid (2000) Review

Sweet Home Alabama Review


OK

Making only a minimal effort to be any different or better than the hundreds of other forgettable, predictable, almost-married-the-wrong-guy romantic comedies that have come before it, "Sweet Home Alabama" has the benefit of a talented, appealing cast and the burden of being entirely dependent on clichés to drive its story.

Reese Witherspoon stars as Melanie Carmichael, a rising-star designer in New York's fashion world who is downright giddy about her new engagement to the political mover-and-shaker son (Patrick Dempsey) of the city's image-conscious mayor (Candice Bergen). In the movie's most romantic scene, Mr. Wonderful proposes by getting down on one knee at Tiffany's, which he's arranged to stay open after hours, and telling her to pick any ring she wants.

But there's one little wrinkle Melanie's fiancé doesn't know about: Before she can marry him, she'll have to divorce her hayseed childhood sweetheart back in small-town Alabama. A handsome, blue-eyed charmer named Jake (Josh Lucas, "A Beautiful Mind") with a playful Paul Newman smirk, she did nothing but fight with him once the magic wore off their relationship, so Melanie bailed out to follow her ambition.

Continue reading: Sweet Home Alabama Review

Bringing Down The House Review


Weak

Toothlessly trite and inundated with a relentlessly chirpy elevator-music score, "Bringing Down the House" is a ghetto-woman-in-the-ritzy-white-suburbs culture-clash comedy sanitized to oblige the same middle-aged white folks that are the butts of most of its jokes.

It's about an uptight, overworked, miserably divorced tax attorney (a hammy yet vanilla Steve Martin) whose life is turned upside down when a woman he'd flirted with in a legal-forum online chatroom turns up on his doorstep for a date not looking anything like the sophisticated, young white lawyer she'd pretended to be. She is, in fact, a feisty, girthy, street-smart spitfire straight outta Compton (and played with relish by Queen Latifah) who has just escaped from prison and wants Martin's help proving her innocence on an erroneous armed robbery charge.

The movie would have little plot if these two didn't spend the next five reels trying to hoodwink Martin's neighbors and law partners into thinking the loud-and-proud Latifah is a nanny or a maid -- telling lie on top of outrageous lie when a simple variation on the truth ("She's an acquaintance that I'm helping with a case") would have sufficed.

Continue reading: Bringing Down The House Review

The Kid Review


OK

Disney sure lays it on thick in "The Kid," a feel-good family flick starring Bruce Willis as a snide, fundamentally unhappy L.A. "image consultant" who meets himself as an 8-year-old boy and learns to embrace his inner child.

The incidental music sounds like the soundtrack from "E.T." crossed with a "Teletubbies" song. Willis -- more determined than ever to avoid being pigeon-holed -- spends a good third of the movie looking wistful or misty. The Kid himself (roly-poly, and yes, adorable newcomer Spencer Breslin) isn't a terribly good actor, but boy has he mastered the art of the wide-eyed double-take. It's enough to send a cynical, grown-up movie critic into sugar shock.

But while I have no trouble pointing out everywhere this rather slight movies is flawed -- and its flaws are significant -- I can also admit when I've had a good time at the movies. And "The Kid" made me smile like, well, a kid.

Continue reading: The Kid Review

Jean Smart

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Jean Smart Movies

The Accountant Movie Review

The Accountant Movie Review

While this slick dramatic thriller plays with some intriguing ideas and themes, it never actually...

Hope Springs Movie Review

Hope Springs Movie Review

The trailers for this film are misleading, promising raucous comedy from the director of The...

Hope Springs Trailer

Hope Springs Trailer

After 31 years of marriage, Kay is starting to feel disheartened by the lack of...

Life As We Know It Trailer

Life As We Know It Trailer

Being named a godparent is truly a remarkable thing, when Holly and Eric are named...

Youth in Revolt Movie Review

Youth in Revolt Movie Review

Maybe this would work if you saw it before any other Michael Cera movies. Or...

Youth In Revolt Trailer

Youth In Revolt Trailer

Nick Twisp is an average 16 year old boy, obsessed with the opposite sex yet...

Garden State Movie Review

Garden State Movie Review

Even before he finds out his mother has died, Andrew Largeman (Zach Braff) is depressed...

The Kid (2000) Movie Review

The Kid (2000) Movie Review

Remorse is a dangerous thing in the mind of a man. It can hold...

Bringing Down The House Movie Review

Bringing Down The House Movie Review

More than a decade after Steve Martin lost control of his own home in Housesitter,...

Snow Day Movie Review

Snow Day Movie Review

It's tough for a Texas boy to relate to the concept of a snow day....

Sweet Home Alabama Movie Review

Sweet Home Alabama Movie Review

Making only a minimal effort to be any different or better than the hundreds of...

Bringing Down The House Movie Review

Bringing Down The House Movie Review

Toothlessly trite and inundated with a relentlessly chirpy elevator-music score, "Bringing Down the House" is...

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