Jean Harlow

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Gwen Stefani leaving her mother's home carrying the Jean Harlow book, 'Harlow in Hollywood: The Blonde Bombshell in the Glamour Capital, 1928-1937' by Darrell Rooney and Mark A. Vieira

Gwen Stefani, Jean Harlow and Rooney Sunday 17th April 2011 Gwen Stefani leaving her mother's home carrying the Jean Harlow book, 'Harlow in Hollywood: The Blonde Bombshell in the Glamour Capital, 1928-1937' by Darrell Rooney and Mark A. Vieira Hollywood, California

Gwen Stefani, Jean Harlow and Rooney
Gwen Stefani, Jean Harlow and Rooney
Gwen Stefani, Jean Harlow and Rooney
Gwen Stefani, Jean Harlow and Rooney
Gwen Stefani, Jean Harlow and Rooney

The Public Enemy Review


Excellent
The opening and closing titles of Warner Bros' The Public Enemy contain a solemn message that implies that the movie isn't meant so much to entertain but to enlighten. Studio head Jack Warner's mandate in the early '30s to produce movies that drew attention to salient social issues in Depression-wracked America resulted in a slew of melodramas (I Am a Fugitive from a Chain Gang from 1932 being its high water mark) and gangster movies that poised themselves as morality fables.

The Public Enemy, like Warner's own Little Caesar from a year earlier, is classically molded in the template of the early-'30s gangster genre. It follows the rise and fall of a vicious hoodlum who finally repents his ways but falls prey to the very cycle of violence that he himself instigated. Thankfully, the movie's prudish show of outrage at the liquor racket and its plea for civic order is overshadowed by its Pre-Code mischief and the sheer delight of watching James Cagney hone the cock-of-the-walk persona that made him an instant star.

Continue reading: The Public Enemy Review

Libeled Lady Review


Excellent
How big of a star was Jean Harlow? In 1936 she got top billing here, despite -- by far -- having less screen time than her three big-name co-stars.

As a matter of fact, Harlow is the least interesting part of Libeled Lady (she's neither the libeler nor the lady in question), but that doesn't make it a fun little movie. The story is a little tricky, so try to keep up: Socialite Connie Allenbury (Myrna Low) is the subject of Warren's (Spencer Tracy) gossipmongering in newsprint. He says she's a homewrecker, but she disagrees and sues. Warren's busted for making stuff up, but he devises a way out: He'll have friend Bill (William Powell) impersonate The Perfect Guy and get in good with her father, eventually proving that Connie is a homewrecker after all. Oh, but Bill's not married. Warren solves that by having his own girlfriend Gladys (Harlow) marry Bill for the sake of convenience.

Continue reading: Libeled Lady Review

Hell's Angels Review


Good
Martin Scorsese tells the story of Hell's Angels in The Aviator better than Hell's Angels does itself, but should you find yourself curious about this epic and infamous production, here's the straight dope. Jean Harlow's screen debut isn't much to look at, to be honest. The air battles, however, are another story: When the boys from Oxford take down that zeppelin, I'm sure 1930's moviegoers had seen nothing like it. Behind the scenes of the war, the movie's a pass.
Jean Harlow

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