Jay Scherick

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The Smurfs Review


OK
A simplistic approach means that this charming adventure-comedy will only appeal to very young children. While it's lively and enjoyably silly, there's just not enough wit in the story or characters, nor enough skill in the animation.

Life is idyllic for the tiny blue Smurfs, whose village is hidden from view in a European valley. But the evil-but-hapless wizard Gargamel (Azaria) wants to capture their magical essence and, when he finds their village, he chases six of them through a vortex that dumps them into Manhattan. Lost in the city, the Smurfs befriend Patrick (Harris) and his pregnant wife Grace (Mays), whose help they need to both escape Gargamel and regenerate the vortex to get home.

Meanwhile, Patrick's under pressure from his boss (Vergara) to come up with an ad campaign.

Continue reading: The Smurfs Review

Norbit Review


OK
Inside Eddie Murphy hides an overweight soul that's longing to swell to its full potential. Which is hilarious because on the surface, the physically fit funnyman hasn't gained a pound (or aged a day) since we first saw him on screen nearly 25 years ago in 48 Hours.

When Murphy feels compelled to toss his proverbial weight around, he doesn't embellish his gluttony with radical feeding frenzies. Instead, he spends hours in a reclined chair and lets Academy Award-winning makeup artist Rick Baker do all the heavy lifting. Murphy and Baker's frequent collaborations over the years have yielded a parade of eclectic (and unusually obese) characters, from Nutty Professor Sherman Klump -- and his rotund family members -- to the acerbic barbershop patrons of Coming to America. When these two join forces, the industry generally acknowledges their accomplishments. Three of Baker's 10 Oscar nominations are for Murphy-led comedies, which includes a win for Nutty, hands-down their most celebrated effort.

Continue reading: Norbit Review

Serving Sara Review


Bad
With his painfully dreary performance in Serving Sara, Matthew Perry proves he will never play any character in a movie other than his annoying Chandler Bing from the television series Friends. If I really wanted to watch Perry be Bing, I could find the same comedy routine in this film on daily reruns of the show. And that would be free. And much less of a waste of time.

In Serving Sara, Perry plays a process server named Joe who has a tendency to screw-up the serving of court papers to his clients. But for some reason beyond comprehension, his boss Ray (Cedric the Entertainer) decides to give the next big assignment to Joe. All he needs to do is rush across town to serve divorce papers to Sara Moore (Elizabeth Hurley). Difficult? Of course! When Joe meets the beautiful Sara, she bribes him with a hefty reward to instead serve the divorce papers on her husband Gordon (Bruce Campbell).

Continue reading: Serving Sara Review

I Spy Review


Terrible
I Spy is based on a popular 1960s television show by the same name where two mismatched spies, one white (Robert Culp) and one black (Bill Cosby), engage in wild antics to fight evil around the world. For a series during the middle of the civil rights era, it was considered groundbreaking. Unfortunately, the movie version completely disrespects this inventiveness of the original series. In fact, the movie is thoroughly insulting.

Owen Wilson is Alex Scott, a second-rate super-spy for the BNS (think CIA, I guess), who is always relegated to the department's least desirable assignments. Other BNS spies, like the suave Bond-like Carlos (Gary Cole), are equipped with the most sophisticated spy tools and receive the most attractive jobs. Scott's newest mission though, requires him to travel to Budapest, Hungary with beautiful fellow agent Rachel Wright (Famke Janssen) to prevent the sale of an invisible stealth spy plane. Some of the world's worst criminals have gathered in Budapest for a party sponsored by criminal mastermind Gundars (Malcolm McDowell). He plans to sell this plane during the celebration for an upcoming boxing match, which happens to involve the wildly flamboyant American featherweight boxing champion Kelly Robinson (Eddie Murphy). The BNS officials recruit Robinson to help Scott and Wright get into the party and accomplish their mission.

Continue reading: I Spy Review

National Security Review


Terrible
Directors often copy the techniques of respected filmmakers without raising much ire. But when a director borrows liberally from the volatile filmography of pyrotechnic prince Michael Bay, they're just asking for trouble. Dennis Dugan's National Security uses enough slow-mo shots and shimmering cinematography in its first 30 minutes to warrant the comparison. The presence of Bad Boys star Martin Lawrence only helps this waste feel like a Bay retread, the kind of garbage Mr. Pearl Harbor would pass on after deeming it far too stupid even for him.

In place of the charismatic Will Smith, Lawrence partners with an uncharacteristically intolerable Steve Zahn as Hank Rafferty, an LAPD officer whose partner is killed while investigating a warehouse break-in. Hank begs for the chance to apprehend the guilty parties, but he's bussed back down to walking his beat, reminded by his superiors (Colm Feore, Bill Duke) that he's "a uniform, not a detective."

Continue reading: National Security Review

Guess Who Review


Very Good
Simon Green (Ashton Kutcher), an anxious, young businessman, is about to journey with his girlfriend, Theresa (Zoe Saldana), to meet her parents for the first time. They also intend to announce their recent engagement, so it's going to be a very eventful trip. But there's one small problem. She's black. He's white. And she hasn't told her parents yet.

Theresa's father, Percy (Bernie Mac), another businessman, has completed underground investigation on Simon, and he likes what he's found. Percy admires Simon for holding a position at a prestigious business; though, Percy doesn't know (and neither does Theresa, for that matter) that Simon just quit this job. Percy and his wife, Marilyn (Judith Scott), live a traditional, affluent life, and are looking forward to meeting the lucky guy who's dating their beautiful daughter, but they're in for quite the surprise.

Continue reading: Guess Who Review

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There's already an Oscars buzz surrounding this movie.

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Jay Scherick Movies

The Smurfs Movie Review

The Smurfs Movie Review

A simplistic approach means that this charming adventure-comedy will only appeal to very young children....

Norbit Movie Review

Norbit Movie Review

Inside Eddie Murphy hides an overweight soul that's longing to swell to its full potential....

Serving Sara Movie Review

Serving Sara Movie Review

With his painfully dreary performance in Serving Sara, Matthew Perry proves he will never play...

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I Spy Movie Review

I Spy Movie Review

I Spy is based on a popular 1960s television show by the same name where...

National Security Movie Review

National Security Movie Review

Directors often copy the techniques of respected filmmakers without raising much ire. But when a...

Guess Who Movie Review

Guess Who Movie Review

Simon Green (Ashton Kutcher), an anxious, young businessman, is about to journey with his girlfriend,...

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