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Jay Hernandez, Arliss Howard, David Pittu and Larry Bryggman - Peter Jay Hernandez, Arliss Howard, David Pittu and Larry Bryggman Wednesday 15th February 2012 Opening night of the Atlantic Theater Company production of 'CQ/CX' at the The Peter Norton Space - Curtain Call.

Jay Hernandez, Arliss Howard, David Pittu and Larry Bryggman
Jay Hernandez, Arliss Howard, David Pittu and Larry Bryggman
Jay Hernandez, Arliss Howard, David Pittu and Larry Bryggman
Jay Hernandez, Arliss Howard, David Pittu and Larry Bryggman
Jay Hernandez, Arliss Howard, David Pittu and Larry Bryggman

Nothing Like The Holidays Review


OK
Caucasians have not cornered the market on festive dysfunction. It may seem like every Christmas family in freefall is as white as the snow that symbolizes the season, but that's not true. All ethnicities have their yuletide horror stories, and it looks like Tinseltown is finally working its way out of the WASP-ish wilds of the suburbs. Last year, This Christmas focused on an African-American clan's tell-all Noel. In 2008, it's the Hispanics' turn to celebrate. Nothing Like the Holidays uses Chicago's Humboldt Park as the backdrop for a great deal of warmth, a little comic craziness, and a whole lot of biology-based nerve fraying. The result is something decent, if not delightful.

For the Rodriguez family, this Christmas is more trying than others. Father Edy (Alfred Molina) is still trying to talk his way out of the doghouse with wife Anna (Elizabeth Peña). She's angry over a past infidelity and is hinting at a divorce. He's angry that their Iraq War veteran son Jesse (Freddy Rodriguez) doesn't want to take over the family business. Wannabe-actress daughter Roxanna (Vanessa Ferlito) is anxious over the possibility of landing a prime role in a television series, while ignoring the local boy Ozzy (Jay Hernandez) who clearly pines away for her. But the couple's biggest concern is Mauricio (John Leguizamo) and his non-Puerto Rican wife Sarah (Debra Messing). Their marriage has yet to produce grandchildren, and for Edy and Anna, family is everything.

Continue reading: Nothing Like The Holidays Review

Jay Hernandez Wednesday 3rd December 2008 'Nothing Like The Holidays' Los Angeles Premiere - Arrivals Los Angeles, California

Jay Hernandez
Jay Hernandez
Jay Hernandez

Quarantine Review


Good
With innovation such a scarce commodity, Hollywood should really stop remaking foreign films. Aside from their almost universal track record for underachieving, there is something so basic about experiencing a movie in its native tongue that no translation (or poorly scripted dubbing) can match. This past August, the sensational Spanish thriller [REC] -- as in the "record" button on a video camera -- caused an uproar in New Zealand when one beleaguered audience member soiled themselves during a screening. Naturally, Tinseltown already had its version -- relabeled Quarantine -- ready to jump on such publicity. As found footage/first person POV style shockers go, it's pretty good. You can leave your adult diapers at home, however.

Viewed through the lens of her accompanying cameraman Scott (Steve Harris), reporter Angela Vidal (Jennifer Carpenter) prepares for a night following the exploits of an LA fire company. Quickly introduced to Jake (Jay Hernandez) and George (Johnathon Schaech), she learns that the hook and ladder life isn't always emergencies and heroism. When a call comes from the tenants of a rundown apartment building, the guys treat it as routine. But Angela and Scott soon uncover something horrifying -- people in the complex appear infected with a kind of super rabies. And the city, state, and national governments are closing off the building, locking everyone -- the sick and the healthy -- within. While trying to get out, our news crew discovers an even more shocking truth. The ill have gone insane and are attacking and killing the living.

Continue reading: Quarantine Review

Jay Hernandez Tuesday 9th September 2008 'Quarantine' premiere held at the Knott's Scary Farm - Arrivals Los Angeles, California

Jay Hernandez
Rade Serbedzija, Jay Hernandez and Jennifer Carpenter
Jay Hernandez
Doug Jones, Jay Hernandez, Jennifer Carpenter and Rade Serbedzija
Doug Jones, Dania Ramirez, Jay Hernandez, Jennifer Carpenter, Johnathon Schaech and Rade Serbedzija
Doug Jones, Dania Ramirez, Jay Hernandez, Jennifer Carpenter, Johnathon Schaech and Rade Serbedzija

Lakeview Terrace Review


Bad
Lakeview Terrace is the seventh film directed by playwright Neil LaBute and it is, by a wide margin, the director's weakest effort to date. A domestic thriller built on brittle tension, the film brandishes racial conflict and flailing machismo before revealing that it has little insight into either topic. Depending on who you talk to, these facts are burdened or lightened by the appearance of the ever-ostentatious Samuel L Jackson.

Set in an affluent corner of a Los Angeles suburb, Jackson enters the screen quietly as Abel Turner, a veteran member of the LAPD. On any given day Abel is either the best parent and neighbor you've ever met, or a lumbering, blue nightmare. The latter opinion is that of Chris and Lisa Mattson (Patrick Wilson and Kerry Washington), a young, interracial couple from Chicago who have just bought the house next to Turner's. She designs clothing while he works for an all-natural supermarket chain named Good. Abel isn't fond of seeing a pretty black woman with a white boy, but his bigger problems are with domestic decorum.

Continue reading: Lakeview Terrace Review

Jay Hernandez - Friday 27th June 2008 at Los Angeles Film Festival Los Angeles, California

Jay Hernandez
Jay Hernandez
Jay Hernandez
Jay Hernandez

Nomad Review


OK
I get the sense that the story of the making of Nomad is far more interesting than the film itself. Shot in Kazakhstan over the course of two years (weather and funding caused delays) with the urging of the Kazakh president, acquired and doctored by Harvey Weinstein, and starring a cast of Americans speaking Kazakh and Kazakhs speaking English with assorted in-line dubbing all over the place (Bai Ling!), this horse-and-yurt epic is picturesque but baffling. What was behind it all? An attempt to recover the dignity of the Kazakh people after the PR debable of Borat?

As for the end product: Nomad will appeal mainly to two small special-interest groups: those with a fascination for 18th century Central Asian geopolitics, and those with a fascination for costume design. Also, people who like swords and horses.

Continue reading: Nomad Review

Hostel: Part II Review


Terrible
Let's lay the cards on the table: Hostel, to me, was one of the coldest, most blindly-conceived horror films to get released in years, basically acting as torture porn rather than an actual film. So, the fact that Hostel: Part II is more thuggishly ambivalent to thought and structure, more cold and condescending to its audience and its characters, and more wildly absurd in both tone and execution doesn't come as a surprise. To be honest, it makes sense that after two thoroughly fascinating horror experiments (Bug and 28 Weeks Later) are released that Hostel: Part II will easily make enough money to secure a third installment and will set the horror genre back a solid decade.

Basically, Part II is Hostel plus a B-cup. Three girls (Lauren German, Bijou Phillips, and Heather Matarazzo) are in Europe studying art. One of the models for the art course is a statuesque beauty (Vera Jordanova) who befriends the girls and starts a friendship with one girl that borders on lesbianism. Of course, the model gets them to go to a special hot springs and stay at a hostel. Shortly after arriving, the girls are drugged, dragged, and prepped for a slab or a death seat.

Continue reading: Hostel: Part II Review

Torque Review


Weak
The tagline on the poster for Torque says nothing about motorcycles. It simply reads: "From the Producer of The Fast and the Furious, XXX, and S.W.A.T."

And a brand is born.

Continue reading: Torque Review

Hostel Review


OK
This day and age, money can buy you just about anything. Sex. Power. Real estate. Expensive cars. Yachts. Vacations. But once you've experienced all that money can buy -- and all the world has to offer -- what can do you for excitement? Is it possible to purchase something unforgettable when the very essence of the word is your day-to-day life?

According to Hostel, extremely wealthy and over privileged businessman can buy something they won't soon forget: another human being's life. Americans are expensive, but if you're open to the ethnicity of your purchase, you can get a human for a fairly reasonable price. But we are not talking about selling humans into slavery. These clients are purchasing "products" to torture and kill.

Continue reading: Hostel Review

The Rookie Review


Good
The Rookie, as you may have figured out from its television advertising blitz, is the true story of Jimmy Morris, a 35-year-old high school science teacher and baseball coach that takes one last shot at his dream of playing in the Major Leagues. It's definitely an inspiring story, but unfortunately the filmmakers never manage to build a strong momentum as the story wends through Morris's life.

The primary shortcoming of the film is that it takes three or four separate stories and loosely strings them together, while leaving out perhaps the most interesting story of all. Granted, the centerpiece of the film is how a high school science teacher makes his way to the major leagues, but this story seems rushed and almost an afterthought by the time we get to it. Instead, the filmmakers take up too much time early on relaying a tenuously related fable about nuns and the origins of baseball in Jim's rural Texas town, and then mill around in Morris's childhood, focusing on his strained relationship with the stern father that did not support his dream.

Continue reading: The Rookie Review

Torque Review


Weak
The tagline on the poster for Torque says nothing about motorcycles. It simply reads: "From the Producer of The Fast and the Furious, XXX, and S.W.A.T."

And a brand is born.

Continue reading: Torque Review

Crazy/beautiful Review


Good
Just going on the sassy and jangly rock-filled MTV ad campaign for crazy/beautiful, you'd think that this teen flick was just another She's All That-style adolescent love story about the popular kid and the misfit, but this is not just another happy-go-lucky clone. While the writing may be a little too self-indulgent with its message-laden speeches, crazy/beautiful is pretty brave in the subjects it takes on, and does its best to avoid many teen movie conventions.

Nicole (Kirsten Dunst) is the privileged daughter of a congressman (Bruce Davison) who remarried to start a new family after Nicole's mother's suicide. Traumatized and emotionally alone, Nicole is always in trouble, and makes a defiant play for wrong-side-of-the-tracks Carlos (Jay Hernandez from MTV's Undressed soap), a hard-working straight-A Latino who commutes two hours from East Los Angeles to the Nicole's ritzy Pacific Palisades high school.

Continue reading: Crazy/beautiful Review

Friday Night Lights Review


Weak

"Friday Night Lights" takes place in a dismal West Texas suburb where society revolves entirely around high school football and the "winning is everything" philosophy is considered an All-American value.

Director Peter Berg ("The Rundown") vividly captures life here beginning with the opening shot -- an aerial view of sagebrush, oil pumps and dust rising to a hazy horizon as a pickup barrels down a dirt road, an AM radio sports show blaring out its windows with boorish, pejorative fans calling in for a round of Monday morning quarterbacking.

But the film seems to endorse the hardcore sports-junkie attitude that obstinately forgives arrogance, misogyny, substance abuse, narrow-mindedness and bullying in any star athlete just as long as he produces results on the field. The movie's principles are seriously out of whack, even as it angles toward a Big Life Lesson about learning to live with falling short of greatness.

Continue reading: Friday Night Lights Review

The Rookie Review


Excellent

Navigating the cliché-clogged, slippery-slope obstacle course of the feel-good family film genre has to be one of the hardest challenges of modern moviemaking. The slightest misstep can send a picture spiraling irreversibly toward a wet crash-landing in a puddle of pandering, manipulative, paint-by-numbers pap.

Add to the mix the often hackneyed nature of baseball movies, not to mention that mantra of liberty-taking film fabricators everywhere -- "based on a true story" -- and you've got a recipe for a Disneyesque disaster.

So the fact that "The Rookie" is a nearly impeccable cinematic experience -- and a warm, wonderful, all-ages triumph besides -- is a miracle akin to the story the film portrays. It's about a high school baseball coach and science teacher whose quashed major-league ballplayer dreams come belatedly true at the age of 35.

Continue reading: The Rookie Review

Ladder 49 Review


OK

The third line of dialogue in "Ladder 49" is the all too familiar refrain "I'm gettin' too old for this s***!" -- an indicator that freshness and originality weren't the highest priority for this firefighter drama built around a post-9/11 brand of sacrificial All-American heroism.

But the formidable opening image of a towering warehouse embraced in the beautiful, horrible tentacles of a furious fire goes a long way toward gluing you to your seat anyway -- especially once fireman Jack Morrison (Joaquin Phoenix) is trapped inside by a floor collapse only seconds after saving a civilian's life.

As the injured Jack awaits what may be an impossible rescue, the film revisits in flashbacks his 10 years as a firefighter, husband and father, beginning with his practical-joke-filled first days at his Baltimore firehouse and at his first fire, where for the sake of character arc and moviegoer accessibility he's made to seem a little too inexperienced to be credible.

Continue reading: Ladder 49 Review

Crazy/beautiful Review


Good

With all the hackneyed, gag-inducing Freddie Prinze, Jr.-style teen romances coming out over the last few years, I've become so cynical about the genre that even with an extremely talented actress like Kirsten Dunst in the lead, I went into "crazy/beautiful" with a chip on my shoulder.

Dunst proved her ability to spot the quality teenybopper scripts last year when she made "Bring It On," the only good cheerleader movie I've ever seen. But playing the rebellious daughter of a Los Angeles congressman? A troubled, party-hardy girl who couples with an academically ambitious Latino boy from the wrong side of the tracks? Boy did that sound like it could go south in a hurry.

Well, I should have trusted Dunst. The ambitiously three-dimensional "crazy/beautiful" never panders or preaches, never turns perky or shallow, and -- gasp! -- its plot doesn't depend on some silly sitcom misunderstanding between boyfriend and girlfriend that is resolved in the last reel with a pat reconciliation followed by a soft-focus freeze-frame on their happy faces.

Continue reading: Crazy/beautiful Review

Jay Hernandez

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Jay Hernandez Movies

A Bad Moms Christmas Movie Review

A Bad Moms Christmas Movie Review

Everyone's back from last year's undemanding adult comedy, plus some starry new cast members, for...

Suicide Squad Movie Review

Suicide Squad Movie Review

DC Comics' villains team up for an overcrowded action movie that never quite finds its...

Suicide Squad Trailer

Suicide Squad Trailer

The Suicide Squad was formed by Amanda Waller, the head of Belle Reve Penitentiary and...

Suicide Squad Trailer

Suicide Squad Trailer

When there's nowhere left to turn, the bad guys might just turn out to be...

Suicide Squad - Comic Con First Look Trailer

Suicide Squad - Comic Con First Look Trailer

Is it really wise to trust your most dangerous sworn enemies? Sometimes you have little...

Max Trailer

Max Trailer

Max played an important role as a working dog in the US military, but he...

Takers Movie Review

Takers Movie Review

Loud and very violent (within the limits of a PG-13 rating), this supposedly gritty thriller...

Takers Trailer

Takers Trailer

Up until now Gordon Cozier and his bank robber gang have remained one of the...

Nothing Like the Holidays Movie Review

Nothing Like the Holidays Movie Review

Caucasians have not cornered the market on festive dysfunction. It may seem like every Christmas...

Quarantine Trailer

Quarantine Trailer

Watch the trailer for Quarantine. Fire officers are often faced with many different situations, when...

Quarantine Movie Review

Quarantine Movie Review

With innovation such a scarce commodity, Hollywood should really stop remaking foreign films. Aside from...

Lakeview Terrace Movie Review

Lakeview Terrace Movie Review

Lakeview Terrace is the seventh film directed by playwright Neil LaBute and it is, by...

Hostel: Part II Movie Review

Hostel: Part II Movie Review

Let's lay the cards on the table: Hostel, to me, was one of the coldest,...

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