Jason Schwartzman Page 4

Jason Schwartzman

Jason Schwartzman Quick Links

News Pictures Video Film Footage Quotes RSS

Brady Cunningham, Marlowe Schwartzman and Jason Schwartzman - Actor Jason Schwatzman walks with his Wife Brady Cunningham and daughter Marlowe at the Farmers Market in Los Angeles - Los Angeles, California, United States - Sunday 1st December 2013

Brady Cunningham, Marlowe Schwartzman and Jason Schwartzman
Brady Cunningham, Marlowe Schwartzman and Jason Schwartzman
Brady Cunningham, Marlowe Schwartzman and Jason Schwartzman
Brady Cunningham, Marlowe Schwartzman and Jason Schwartzman
Brady Cunningham, Marlowe Schwartzman and Jason Schwartzman
Brady Cunningham, Marlowe Schwartzman and Jason Schwartzman

Jason Schwartzman - AFI FEST 2013 Presented By Audi - Disney's "Saving Mr. Banks" Opening Night Gala Premiere At TCL Chinese Theatre - Hollywood, California, United States - Friday 8th November 2013

Jason Schwartzman
Jason Schwartzman
Jason Schwartzman
Jason Schwartzman
Jason Schwartzman
B.j. Novak and Jason Schwartzman

Jason Schwartzman - Los Angeles premiere of A24's 'The Bling Ring' at Directors Guild Of America - Arrivals - Los Angeles, California, United States - Wednesday 5th June 2013

Jason Schwartzman
Jason Schwartzman
Jason Schwartzman
Jason Schwartzman
Jason Schwartzman

Jason Schwartzman - 2013 Film Independent Spirit Awards at Santa Monica Beach - Arrivals - Los Angeles, California, United States - Saturday 23rd February 2013

Jason Schwartzman
Jason Schwartzman
Jason Schwartzman
Jason Schwartzman and Roman Coppola
Jason Schwartzman and Roman Coppola
Jason Schwartzman

Jason Schwartzman - The 85th Annual Oscars at Hollywood & Highland Center - Red Carpet Arrivals - Los Angeles, California, United States - Sunday 24th February 2013

Jason Schwartzman
Jason Schwartzman
Jason Schwartzman

Jason Schwartzman - 2013 Film Independent Spirit Awards at Independent Spirit Awards - Los Angeles, California, United States - Saturday 23rd February 2013

Jason Schwartzman
Jason Schwartzman
Jason Schwartzman

Jason Schwartzman New York City, NY, United States "A Glimpse Inside The Mind Of Charles Swan III" New York Screening Wednesday 9th January 2013

Jason Schwartzman
Jason Schwartzman
Jason Schwartzman
Jason Schwartzman
Jason Schwartzman
Jason Schwartzman and Roman Coppola

Jason Schwartzman - Brady Cunningham and Jason Schwartzman Monday 30th July 2012 Lexus unveils the LX460 Sport with a photo Exhibit by Ellen von Unwerth at The Metreon City View

Jason Schwartzman
Devon Aoki, Jaime King and Jason Schwartzman
Devon Aoki, Jaime King and Jason Schwartzman
Devon Aoki, Jaime King and Jason Schwartzman
Jaime King and Jason Schwartzman
Jaime King and Jason Schwartzman

Jason Schwartzman and Cannes Film Festival Tuesday 15th May 2012 out and about for the Cannes Film Festival.

Jason Schwartzman and Cannes Film Festival

Jason Schwartzman and Cannes Film Festival Tuesday 15th May 2012 Celebrities are seen arriving at The Martinez Hotel during the 65th Annual Cannes Film Festival

Jason Schwartzman and Cannes Film Festival
Jason Schwartzman and Cannes Film Festival
Jason Schwartzman and Cannes Film Festival
Jason Schwartzman and Cannes Film Festival
Jason Schwartzman and Cannes Film Festival

Jason Schwartzman and Cannes Film Festival Tuesday 15th May 2012 Celebrities arrive at Nice Airport for the Cannes Film Festival

Jason Schwartzman and Cannes Film Festival
Jason Schwartzman and Cannes Film Festival
Jason Schwartzman and Cannes Film Festival

Jason Schwartzman Friday 28th October 2011 leaves Le Pain Quotidien after having lunch with his wife Brady Cunningham and their daughter Marlowe Los Angeles, California

Jason Schwartzman
Jason Schwartzman
Jason Schwartzman
Jason Schwartzman
Jason Schwartzman
Jason Schwartzman

*file* and Jason Schwartzman Thursday 10th September 2009

*file* and Jason Schwartzman

*file*, Jason Schwartzman and AFI Friday 30th October 2009

*file*, Jason Schwartzman and Afi

*file* and Jason Schwartzman Thursday 1st November 2007

*file* and Jason Schwartzman

*file* and Jason Schwartzman Wednesday 18th August 2010 at Empire Leicester Square

*file* and Jason Schwartzman

Scott Pilgrim Vs. The World Review


OK
So uber-hip that young audiences will adore it, this hyperactive film can't decide whether it's a comic book or a videogame. Sure, it's visually whizzy and often very funny, but filmmaker Wright loses the story in the scuffle.

In Toronto, Scott (Cera) is a 22-year-old geek in a rock band. His bandmates (Webber, Pill and Simmons), sister (Kendrick) and flatmate (Culkin) tease him for dating a teenager (Wong), but she's the band's biggest fan. Then he meets Ramona (Winstead), who is literally his dream girl, and to win her hand he has to defeat her seven evil exes in outlandish battles. These include an action movie star (Evans) and a top music promoter (Schwartzman). And one (Routh) is member of a band fronted by Scott's own evil ex (Larson).

Continue reading: Scott Pilgrim Vs. The World Review

Jason Schwartzman - Wednesday 18th August 2010 at Empire Leicester Square London, England

Jason Schwartzman
Jason Schwartzman and Edgar Wright
Jason Schwartzman
Jason Schwartzman
Jason Schwartzman
Jason Schwartzman

Jason Schwartzman - Tuesday 27th July 2010 at Grauman's Chinese Theatre Hollywood, California

Jason Schwartzman
Jason Schwartzman
Jason Schwartzman
Jason Schwartzman
Jason Schwartzman
Jason Schwartzman

Jason Schwartzman Saturday 24th July 2010 is seen arriving at Comic Con. San Diego, California

Jason Schwartzman
Jason Schwartzman
Jason Schwartzman
Jason Schwartzman

Scott Pilgrim Vs. The World Trailer


From the director of Hot Fuzz and Shaun Of The Dead comes Scott Pilgrim Vs. The World.

Continue: Scott Pilgrim Vs. The World Trailer

Jason Schwartzman Thursday 10th September 2009 The New York premiere of 'Fantastic Mr Fox' at Bergdorf Goodman - Arrivals New York City, USA

Jason Schwartzman
Jason Schwartzman and Wes Anderson
Jason Schwartzman and Wes Anderson
Jason Schwartzman
Jason Schwartzman and Wes Anderson

Fantastic Mr Fox Review


Very Good
This is much more of a Wes Anderson film than the Roald Dahl classic on which it's based. That's not necessarily a bad thing, but it could cause problems with fans of the book. The central themes are still there, but this is essentially a quirky dysfunctional family romp.

Mr Fox (voiced by Clooney) has a pretty fantastic life as a newspaper columnist living in his den with his wife (Streep), surly teen son Ash (Schwartzman) and visiting nephew Kristofferson (Anderson). After Fox convinces his wife to move aboveground to a tree, he becomes tempted to go back to his bird-stealing ways.

And with his possum pal Kylie (Wolodarsky), he goes on a spree that enrages the local farmers, led by the furious Bean (Gambon), who vows revenge. But this puts the entire local animal population in danger.

Continue reading: Fantastic Mr Fox Review

Funny People Review


Good
Apatow is a superb writer-director, but his increasing running times are evidence of an irritating self-indulgence. Despite this film's sharp dialog and terrific story, its bloated, undisciplined editing keeps it from being a classic.

George Simmons (Sandler) is an A-list star whose life is awash in alcohol and women. His lack of real friends becomes a problem when he's diagnosed with a terminal blood disease, so he latches onto struggling comic Ira (Rogen), hiring him as an assistant and confidant. The threat of dying makes George reconsider his life, and he realises he only ever loved one woman, Laura (Mann), who now has a family with Aussie businessman Clarke (a hilarious Bana). And when George's medical treatment succeeds, he decides to get her back.

Continue reading: Funny People Review

Funny People Trailer


Watch the trailer for Funny People

Continue: Funny People Trailer

The Darjeeling Limited Review


Excellent
It was a boarding school in Rushmore, a gorgeous city home in The Royal Tenenbaums, and a grand oceanic vessel in The Life Aquatic; Wes Anderson has a jones for condensed spaces. In The Darjeeling Limited, it's a luxurious locomotive rolling through the sublime terrain of Darjeeling, India. Stowed away amongst the German tourists and the toppling luggage are the Whitman Brothers (Jack, Francis, and Peter), a gang of American buffoons trying to find enlightenment, salvation, and relief amidst the sand dunes.

The eldest Whitman brother, Francis (Owen Wilson), found time for an epiphany as he lay on the ground after a motorcycle accident, leaving to wonder why his younger brothers weren't with him. His remedy consists of a brotherly train trip accompanied by a surprise visit to their estranged mother's parish. Don't worry: There's a laminated itinerary if you get confused. The youngest, Jack (Anderson staple Jason Schwartzman), comes aboard to shed the skin of his ex-girlfriend while Peter (Anderson newbie Adrien Brody), the middle brother, has begun feeling desperation over his impending fatherhood. Moreover, they are digging and scratching at every surface to hide the grief over their father's passing; the event that caused their initial scattering.

Continue reading: The Darjeeling Limited Review

The Darjeeling Limited Trailer


Director Wes Anderson brings us, The Darjeeling Limited, starring Owen Wilson, Adrien Brody and Jason Schwartzman, is an emotional comedy about three brothers re-forging family bonds. The eldest, played by Wilson, hopes to reconnect with his two younger siblings by taking them on a train trip across the vibrant and sensual landscape of India. 

Continue: The Darjeeling Limited Trailer

Marie Antoinette Review


Very Good
The word "soft" summarizes the world of Sofia Coppola, perfectly. Each film she has made has the tenderness, vagueness and, ultimately, the sensibility of a fluffy, white cloud in the middle of a blue sky. With two near-perfect films on her resume, 1999's The Virgin Suicides and 2003's majestic Lost in Translation, Sofia Coppola's third film should have been an easy play. Instead, we are given the beguiling Marie Antoinette.

There's the famous Marie-Antoinette (Kirsten Dunst): the one who so insipidly said "Let them eat cake" when learning of the famine and starvation of the French people and the one who had her head cut off and displayed, with ample delight, to the same people she told to eat said cake. Then there's the private Marie Antoinette: the one who was forced into a French marriage (she was Austrian originally) by her brutish mother and who would eventually lose a newborn baby right as her kingdom was crashing down. Coppola seems very confused as to whom she wants to show in Marie Antoinette.

Continue reading: Marie Antoinette Review

Marie Antoinette Review


Very Good
The word "soft" summarizes the world of Sofia Coppola, perfectly. Each film she has made has the tenderness, vagueness and, ultimately, the sensibility of a fluffy, white cloud in the middle of a blue sky. With two near-perfect films on her resume, 1999's The Virgin Suicides and 2003's majestic Lost in Translation, Sofia Coppola's third film should have been an easy play. Instead, we are given the beguiling Marie Antoinette.

There's the famous Marie-Antoinette (Kirsten Dunst): the one who so insipidly said "Let them eat cake" when learning of the famine and starvation of the French people and the one who had her head cut off and displayed, with ample delight, to the same people she told to eat said cake. Then there's the private Marie Antoinette: the one who was forced into a French marriage (she was Austrian originally) by her brutish mother and who would eventually lose a newborn baby right as her kingdom was crashing down. Coppola seems very confused as to whom she wants to show in Marie Antoinette.

Continue reading: Marie Antoinette Review

Spun Review


OK
Wes Anderson fans will barely recognize Spun protagonist, if you can call him that, Jason Schwartzman. Though he's been in a handful of forgettable roles since claiming cult status with his breakthrough in 1998's Rushmore, he's back to center frame as a speed-addicted, goalless youngster. Though this time around he somehow manages to snag a buxom blonde dancer and tie her to a bed for a few days instead of merely pining away for the older woman.

But with an eclectic cast that includes John Leguizamo, Mena Suvari, and Mickey Rourke, Spun is more about exuberant editing providing a humorous glimpse into a small, bored, drug community than a focus on any particular acting or writing talent. Once the pizzazz of quick cuts and graphic novel touches has washed over the normal tell-tale signs of substance abuse by all the characters, you're left with another drug movie that feels as if it's trying too hard to be Trainspotting, without the spiffy production design.

Continue reading: Spun Review

I Heart Huckabees Review


Very Good
In David O. Russell's I Heart Huckabees, everyone talks a little bit like they're in a play -- the dialogue is unusually dense and abstract for a film, even an artsy one, even an "existential comedy," as this one purports to be. Huckabees is like a screwball comedy filtered through a student thesis project, but it's nothing if not original.

Five years have passed since Russell's crowning achievement so far, the Gulf War comedy-drama Three Kings, and the ensemble cast for his new film suggests he's spent a lot of that time collecting even more talent to act out his socio-comedic semi-political statements. Jason Schwartzman leads as Albert, a young environmental activist suffering a professional and personal meltdown, as his "coalition" is invaded by smarmy account executive Brad Stand (Jude Law) from the Wal-Mart-like chain store Huckabees (Albert wants to save a local marsh; Stand has his eye on good PR for his company). Albert hires the Jaffees, a pair of "existential detectives" (Lily Tomlin and Dustin Hoffman) to help solve the "case" of his messy life. Half private investigator and half new-age therapist, Tomlin commences the investigation by asking, "Have you ever transcended space and time?"

Continue reading: I Heart Huckabees Review

Slackers Review


Terrible
While Orange County's tale of college woe is delivering a fine time to comedy audiences, its bland, unfunny, useless stepbrother is unspooling right down the hall in the multiplex. Slackers, by first-time director and former fashion photographer Dewey Nicks, is such a futile, awkward, poor attempt at exposing the "wacky craziness" of higher education that even its title is completely wrong.

And that's because the main protagonists are not slackers at all -- in fact, they're a trio of heady, hard-working college cheaters. Beginning with an elaborate scam that actually gives the movie some potential, we are introduced to our leads (Devon Sawa, Jason Segel, and Michael C. Maronna) as they simultaneously shoot video of the women's cross-country team, steal a physics exam, and fake getting hit by a truck. But screenwriter David H. Steinberg (story writer on American Pie 2) tries building an entire feature based on one decent scenario. And he, as well as the rest of us, are in some deep trouble for the remainder of the 87 minutes.

Continue reading: Slackers Review

Simone Review


Good
It might sound contrived to say that a film about a computer-generated movie star is a little flat but... well, there it is. It's the unfortunate truth about writer/director Andrew Niccol's Simone, an Al Pacino-led comedy where Niccol visits some of the same intriguing notions of fame, success, and public perception as in his screenplay for The Truman Show. In that film, the center of attention was a man watched by an adoring and all-knowing viewing audience -- in Simone, the public still loves a superstar... they just have no clue that she's a complete fake.

And not "fake," like some butt-kissing movie actress, but really fake. Simone (or S1m0ne, as Niccol sharply titles the film) is the perfect pixilated creation of a Microsoft-age mad scientist, who's created his flawless CGI actress specifically for floundering moviemaker Viktor Taransky (a truly entertaining Al Pacino). Viktor needs a hit badly and the lead actress on his new feature -- played by Winona Ryder, in a painfully ironic appearance -- has just stormed off his new movie due to "creative differences." Nine months later (human gestation period, if I'm not mistaken) Simone is born to take her place. And since our obsessive inventor has quickly died from an eye tumor, contracted from too much computer use(!), only Viktor knows the true secret of his new lead actress.

Continue reading: Simone Review

Rushmore Review


Extraordinary
When I asked Wes Anderson and Owen Wilson what would be next after 1996's Bottle Rocket, they told me they were working on a number of projects about "serious things." I expressed skepticism then, and it turns out it was justly founded. Rushmore is anything but serious, despite the Presidential-sounding name.

So, what is Rushmore? Rushmore is a prestigious private school in Nowhere, U.S.A. (actually Houston and Dallas, Texas), where its most vocal student, Max (Schwartzman), is also its worst academically. Rushmore the movie follows Max in his travails at school, where he falls hopelessly in love with teacher Miss Cross (Williams, straight from The Postman and a haircut). Unwilling to accept that the age differential is a concern, the 15-year old Max embarks on a grand scheme to build an enormous aquarium as a symbol of affection. That he builds it on the school's baseball diamond is what gets him thrown out of Rushmore.

Continue reading: Rushmore Review

Shopgirl Review


Very Good
Based on his movies and comedy, Steve Martin appears to truly hate Los Angeles. And yet he keeps coming back here to make movies about how the city makes people so uncommonly fulfilled. It's love and hate. Passive and aggressive. Come to think of it, that's a lot like his new film Shopgirl.

Based on a 130-page story by Martin that is commonly termed a novella, Shopgirl is about a Saks 5th Avenue glove counter clerk named Mirabelle (Claire Danes). There's not much call for gloves in Los Angeles, so Mirabelle spends most of her days expressionlessly leaning against the glass, waiting for life to start. By night, she occasionally sketches a nude picture of herself: She's also an artist, again waiting to be discovered.

Continue reading: Shopgirl Review

Bewitched Review


Weak
Campy-revamp remakes and Nicole Kidman just don't mix.

But the problem is not the actress's performances. Sheadded bite and ironic melodiousness to last year's slapdash, self-destructing"TheStepford Wives," and she keeps the newself-aware, big-screen version of "Bewitched" afloat with herdelightful spark of perky naivete as a witch trying to live a mortal life.She has a deftly silly sense of comedic balance and timing.

The problem is, when she's just looking to have some funbetween dramatic roles, the girl can't pick a script.

Like "The Stepford Wives," this new comedy isa mess at the screenplay level. It changes mood, direction and (like "Wives")the rules of its own reality in every other scene. The plot is sloppy andstructurally unsound. Fictional characters from the original "Bewitched"come to life in single scenes for no explored reason ("The Daily Show's"Steve Carell is bloody awful as queeny Uncle Arthur) -- and this happenseven though the bulk of the meta-cinema plot takes place in real-worldHollywood. You see, Kidman plays an actual witch who becomes an actressand gets cast as TV sorceress Samantha Stevens in a network remake of thetitular 1960s sitcom.

Continue reading: Bewitched Review

The Hitchhiker's Guide To The Galaxy Review


Good
Imagine the madcap sensibilities of Monty Python appliedto science fiction and you'll begin to have an inkling of the whimsicallyeccentric humor of "The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy," anenormously successful cult-comedy franchise of which a new feature filmis only the latest incarnation.

The story of Arthur Dent (Martin Freeman), a nebbish Englishmansaved from the demolition of Earth (to make way for a hyperspace bypass)by an alien he'd hitherto thought was a pal from Gilford, "Hitchhiker'sGuide" follows his very reluctant and frequently absurd adventuresin space.

In the first 15 minutes alone, Arthur and Ford Prefect(Mos Def) are jettisoned from one of the ships that blew up the Earth (afterbeaming aboard surreptitiously, being captured and tortured with alienpoetry), then against all odds they're rescued from the vacuum of spaceseconds later by a passing vessel with a warp drive designed to exploitjust such unlikelihoods -- the Infinite Improbability Drive.

Onboard Arthur is improbably reunited with Trish McMillan(Zooey Deschanel), a girl he fell for at a party some months before, onlyto see her run off with Zaphod Bebblebox (Sam Rockwell), a guy who claimedto be from another planet. Zaphod, even more improbably, turns out to beFord's whacked-out semi-cousin (they share three of the same mothers) whobecame president of the galaxy just so he'd have the necessary clearanceto steal this very ship (because he thought it was cool).

Continue reading: The Hitchhiker's Guide To The Galaxy Review

Slackers Review


Bad

Trying to disguise the fact that "Slackers" is really just a paint-by-numbers, boys-will-be-boys college comedy, first-time director Dewey Nicks slathers the flick in Tom Green-style bad taste outrageousness as its misogynistic cool jerk hero (Devon Sawa) lies his way into the bed of the generically gorgeous sweetheart.

A sampling of the movie's let's-see-what-we-can-get-away-with gags: Dave (Sawa) gets orally serviced by his girlfriend's horny middle-aged mom. The girlfriend's comedically creepy stalker does the same for a 70-year-old woman in a hospital bed. Three characters masturbate on screen, one of whom makes a puppet out of his privates in one of many scenes that have nothing to do with the plot and everything to do with pushing the envelope.

If that's the kind of thing you want to pay $8 or $9 to see, then be my guest. If you expect more than bottom-feeder humor from your multiplex experience, then "Slackers" is one frustrating film because buried within these dregs of humor are some audacious comedic gems.

Continue reading: Slackers Review

I ? Huckabees Review


Good

The one philosophy behind the existential screwball comedy "I ? Huckabees" (pronounce the ? as "heart") is that there is no one philosophy. A satire of spiritual gurus, self-help and other psychological gimmickry, it makes its point by being so esoteric and cerebrally akimbo that it will likely divide audiences between those who find its deliberately abstruse discombobulation amusing and to the point, and those who find it just abstruse and discombobulated.

Written and directed by David O. Russell, the observant and darkly comical wit behind the Gulf War derision "Three Kings," the ensemble storyline whirlpools around Albert Markovski (Jason Schwartzman), an unhinged and obsessive young environmentalist who has seen the open-space preservation group he chartered slip through his fingers and into the hands of a snake-oil-charming corporate stooge named Brad Stand (Jude Law). Brad is, in fact, an executive at Huckabees -- a slick, corporate retailer with a habit of moving into small towns and building megastores where there had once been open space.

With his failure causing him to question his whole life, Albert seeks metaphysical peace of mind from Bernard and Vivian Jaffe (Dustin Hoffman and Lily Tomlin), a pair of unconventional, off-kilter and out-of-sync private eyes who specialize in solving the mysteries of their clients' inner turmoil. Soon they are, quite conspicuously, following Albert to work, peering through his windows, digging through his trash, and pairing him up with another lost soul as a partner in intellectual recovery -- Tommy (Mark Wahlberg), a blue-collar lug of a firefighter whose eye-opening visit inside his own head has rapidly become a slide into bemused Nihilism.

Continue reading: I ? Huckabees Review

Cq Review


OK

At once an homage to and a spoof of two signature styles of late 1960s cinema, "CQ" is an enjoyably eccentric entry into feature filmmaking by a writer-director who has the art form in his blood -- Roman Coppola, Francis Ford Coppola's son.

The title refers to an old Morse Code and ham radio signal sent to seek any kind of response ("seek you"), and it's reflective of the movie's main character. An ambivalent aspiring filmmaker (Jeremy Davies) seeking inspiration in 1969 Paris, he's torn between his desire to make a conceptual, black-and-white New Wave art film and his day job editing a studio's cheesy, sexploitive "Barbarella"-like B-movie.

Gritting his teeth over silly science fiction by day, he spends his nights locked in his bathroom, burning through miles of "borrowed" film on rambling autobiographic monologues while his live-in girlfriend frets in frustration. Davies' dilemma comes to a head when the manic director of the sexy sci-fi flick (played with comedic panache by Gerard Depardieu) is fired over creative differences.

Continue reading: Cq Review

Spun Review


OK

An entertaining but hideous romp on the circus side of crystal meth addiction, "Spun" wants to be another "Trainspotting" and/or "Requiem for a Dream." Inundated with trip-cam trickery that keeps the audience riding the ups and downs of the main character's drug buzzes, the film is nothing if not stylish, but falls short for lack of depth.

Music video guru and first-time feature director Jonas Akerlund makes liberal use of the disorienting, grainy, washed-out look of bleach-bypass photography. When Ross -- a downward-spiraling college dropout (played by Jason Schwartzman of "Rushmore" fame) on the leading edge of addiction but still clinging to his letter-jacket memories -- takes a hit of speed, the movie's tempo is fed a brief burst of shaky acceleration. A rapid montage of sensory-assault, nervous-tension images dance across the screen, sometimes in the form of cinematic hyper-awareness (e.g., fish-eye lens ultra-close-ups of chapped lips, bloodshot eyes and nervous-ticking fingers), sometimes in the form of animated, soddenly pornographic hallucinations.

The world of "Spun" is an acutely realized day-lit underground of ghetto shacks and combustible meth labs in cheap, airless hotel rooms (greatly enhanced by a hip-trippy score from the Smashing Pumpkin's Billy Corgan) in which all the characters seem acquiescently ensnared.

Continue reading: Spun Review

S1m0ne Review


Weak

Beneath the uncanny, inevitable and seemingly shrewd facade of the movie-biz farce "Simone" -- about a computer-generated actress taking Hollywood by storm because nobody knows she's not real -- lies a plot cobbled together from largely flat and uncreative moments.

The brainchild of inventive and otherworldly writer-director Andrew Niccol ("Gattaca," "The Truman Show" screenplay), who plucked the picture's concept out of the film industry's paranoid collective subconscious, "Simone" stars Al Pacino as Viktor Taransky, a washed-up and somewhat neurotic director whose last chance at making a big studio film has just walked off the set along with his petulant leading lady (Winona Ryder in a cameo).

But just as he envisions his career going off a cliff, a dying wacko computer genius and Taransky fan (Elias Koteas) brings the director a computer hard drive containing the culmination of his life's work: a program that creates a near-perfect, completely malleable, realistic simulation of beautiful girl. Called Simone (a contraction of Simulation One), in the confines of a computer she can walk, talk, flirt and cry with a single keystroke. She has a database of famous actresses' best performances to draw from for mannerisms and moods. She's utterly at Taransky's control and, of course, her fabricated "performances" can be digitally inserted into any scene of his movie, any way he chooses.

Continue reading: S1m0ne Review

Jason Schwartzman

Jason Schwartzman Quick Links

News Pictures Video Film Footage Quotes RSS
Advertisement

Jason Schwartzman

Date of birth

26th June, 1980

Occupation

Actor

Sex

Male

Height

1.68


Advertisement
Advertisement

Jason Schwartzman Movies

The Overnight Trailer

The Overnight Trailer

Alex and Emily are feeling distinctly out of place in their sparkly new neighborhood of...

Listen Up Philip Trailer

Listen Up Philip Trailer

Philip Lewis Friedman is a very successful writer, though not the most likeable of people....

Big Eyes Movie Review

Big Eyes Movie Review

Tim Burton combines his sunnier filmmaking style (Big Fish) with his more deranged impulses (Dark...

The Grand Budapest Hotel - Featurettes Trailer

The Grand Budapest Hotel - Featurettes Trailer

While preparing to film 'The Grand Budapest Hotel', director Wes Anderson and company scouted for...

Big Eyes Trailer

Big Eyes Trailer

Margaret is an inspirational American painter desperate to sell her unique artwork depicting women and...

The Grand Budapest Hotel Trailer

The Grand Budapest Hotel Trailer

The cast and crew of 'The Grand Budapest Hotel' discuss the story, the main characters'...

Advertisement
Grand Budapest Hotel Trailer

Grand Budapest Hotel Trailer

Gustave may be aloof and snobbish in many ways, but he's also extremely charming with...

The Grand Budapest Hotel Trailer

The Grand Budapest Hotel Trailer

Charismatic but somewhat aloof concierge at the Grand Budapest Hotel, Gustave H, is less than...

The Grand Budapest Hotel Trailer

The Grand Budapest Hotel Trailer

Gustave H is a charismatic and over-friendly concierge at the Grand Budapest Hotel whose conduct...

Advertisement
Artists
Actors
    Filmmakers
      Artists
      Bands
        Musicians
          Artists
          Celebrities
             
              Artists
              Interviews
                musicians & bands in the news
                  actors & filmmakers in the news
                    celebrities in the news

                      Go Back in Time using our News archive to see what happened on a particular day in the past.