Janeane Garofalo

Janeane Garofalo

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Janeane Garofalo - Janeane Garofalo performs at the Moontower Comedy and Oddity Festival in Austin, Texas. - Austin, Texas, United States - Thursday 21st April 2016

Janeane Garofalo
Janeane Garofalo
Janeane Garofalo
Janeane Garofalo
Janeane Garofalo
Janeane Garofalo

Janeane Garofalo and Lisa Edelstein - Photo's from the launch party for BRAVO'S first scripted series 'Girlfriends' Guide to Divorce' The party was held at the Crosby Hotel in New York City, New York, United States - Thursday 20th November 2014

Janeane Garofalo and Lisa Edelstein
Janeane Garofalo, Lisa Edelstein and Beau Garrett
Paul Adelstein, Janeane Garofalo, Lisa Edelstein, Beau Garrett and Necar Zadegan
Paul Adelstein, Janeane Garofalo, Lisa Edelstein, Beau Garrett, Necar Zadegan and Marti Nixon
Paul Adelstein, Janeane Garofalo, Lisa Edelstein, Beau Garrett, Necar Zadegan, Marti Nixon and Alanna Ubach
Janeane Garofalo

Janeane Garofalo - NBCUniversal Cable Entertainment presents An All together Upfront celebration at Javits Center in New York City - New York City, New York, United States - Thursday 15th May 2014

Janeane Garofalo

Janeane Garofalo New York City, NY, United States "A Glimpse Inside The Mind Of Charles Swan III" New York Screening Wednesday 9th January 2013

Janeane Garofalo
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Janeane Garofalo
Janeane Garofalo

Janeane Garofalo Married Big Bang Producer, But Forgot All About It


Janeane Garofalo Rob Cohen

Sometimes a marriage can feel so bad as to feel like you’re not even in one anymore. And sometimes they feel like that because you’d completely forgotten you’d got married in the first place. Sound impossible? Actress Janeane Garofalo and writer and The Big Bang Theory producer Rob Cohen managed to do just that, after it was revealed that Cohen’s plans for a new matrimony couldn’t go through until his current one had ended.

What current one though? According to the New York Post the pair did in fact get hitched 20 years ago in – where else – that most romantic of environments, Las Vegas. After a skin full, and then presumably another skin full as well, Garofalo and Cohen – who were dating at the time – decided to go down the aisle at Vegas. “Rob and I got married, for real, which we had to have a notary dissolve not 30 minutes before we got here tonight,” Garofalo said as she turned up for a reunion for The Ben Stiller Show. “We were married for 20 years until this evening.”

She added, “We got married drunk in Vegas . . . We dated for a year, and we got married at a drive-through chapel in a cab. [We thought] you have to go down to the courthouse and sign papers and stuff, so who knew? We were married, and apparently now that [Rob] is getting married for real, his lawyer dug up something.” Though their marriage has been referenced in the past, it’s long been considered a joke between the two still-close friends, and not a real … y’know… thing. Think again.

Continue reading: Janeane Garofalo Married Big Bang Producer, But Forgot All About It

Janeane Garofalo Saturday 10th November 2012 'The Ben Stiller Show' reunion, held at The Paley Center for Media - Arrivals

Ratatouille Review


Essential
A fine red wine only gets better with age. Long before that cork is popped and the first pour hits your favorite wine glass, you already know how great that vintage vino is going to taste. Much like that bottle of wine, the animated films from Pixar Studios keep getting better with time. So how appropriate is it that its latest offering, Ratatouille, is all about delicious food, family and friends, and a glass of wine to wash it all down.

Ratatouille is an intricate dish, infused with energetic and amusing storylines that are all fully cooked and complementary to the film's rich visual look. It's easily the best Pixar creation next to The Incredibles; arguably it's even better. No surprise that Ratatouille is written and directed by Brad Bird, the same mastermind behind The Incredibles. Bird excels at integrating thematic elements that will entertain the youngest and oldest members of the audience alike.

Continue reading: Ratatouille Review

The Larry Sanders Show: Not Just The Best Of... Review


Extraordinary
It's a cliche now to complain that HBO has the best original programming on television, but never has that been more true than in the case of The Larry Sanders Show, which ran for six seasons from 1992 to 1998 and was nominated for (and won) countless Emmys and every other award under the sun.

The show is pure genius and pure simplicity: Larry Sanders (Garry Shandling) is a late night talk show host on an unspecified network in the post-Carson era. Each week we were treated to the behind-the-scenes antics that go on before such a show can get on the air five nights a week: At its slapstick simplest we have Carol Burnett fleeing spiders by climbing on Larry's back. At its smarmy sickest, we have Larry's agent (Bob Odenkirk) selling him down the river so he can move on to greener pastures: Namely one Jon Stewart, a guest host for the show who became a running theme in later years as a cheap, network-approved replacement for the skewing-too-old Larry.

Continue reading: The Larry Sanders Show: Not Just The Best Of... Review

Duane Hopwood Review


Weak
Call it the Leaving Las Vegas effect: Everybody wants to make a movie where they play a disgusting antihero who, even as he self-destructs, manages to find a way to redeem himself in the end, even if he's still a dangerous drunk and his personal growth is just minimal. That's well and good, but I'm not sure that David Schwimmer is the go-to guy for such a role. Obviously trying to break free from a decade of typecasting as a nervous geek, he's uncomfortably out of place here and the performance just doesn't work. Things turn out better for Jeneane Garofalo as our pal Duane's ex-wife, though her underwritten role meant that I barely recognized her before the end. Safe to skip. "Hopwood," incidentally, was the plaintiff in the famous "reverse discrimination" lawsuit that ended affirmative action in many arenas. When it's more entertaining to think about an old legal case than watch a movie it has nothing to do with, well... hmmmm.

Wonderland (2003) Review


Very Good
It takes a bold filmmaker to splash the legend of John Holmes (aka porn star Johnny Wadd) up on the screen before his film has even started, giving the hard-to-believe basics of Holmes' legend (1,000 films made, slept with 14,000 women), and then say that the movie to follow isn't about all of that, it's about what happened to John afterward. One imagines many an aging porn connoisseur ducking out the theater door upon that announcement. But director James Cox has made a solid bet, for the events of the summer of 1981 on Los Angeles's Wonderland Avenue make anything that could have happened before in Holmes's life seem like the most inconsequential trivia.

On July 1 of that year, four people were savagely beaten to death in a Laurel Canyon apartment that had long been a party hangout and drug-dealing haven; a fifth person was put into intensive care. Holmes (Val Kilmer) was at the center of the tangle of paranoia, greed, and confusion that led to the massacre. Always hanging out at the apartment scamming drugs for his vacuum-like habit, Holmes incurs the enmity of the hard cases living there (played by Tim Blake Nelson, Dylan McDermott in a frighteningly unconvincing biker beard, and Josh Lucas). To make it up to them, Holmes acts as their inside man for a robbery of the palatial home of his buddy Eddie Nash (Eric Bogosian), who just happens to be one of the biggest club-owners in Southern California and a bona-fide gangster, to boot. Things go poorly after the robbery, to say the least.

Continue reading: Wonderland (2003) Review

Big Trouble Review


Terrible
Much has been said about Big Trouble, another film meant for a near-September 11th release that was postponed because its contents would be too upsetting amidst the tragedy. Now, seven months and countless airport security measures later, Touchtone Pictures has determined that it is a better time for the film's release.

But forget about September 11th for a moment and consider this: Is there ever a good time to release a film that endorses bribing airline personal for tickets to carry a suitcase containing a ticking nuclear bomb onto a plane? The answer is easy. Pre- or post-September 11th, there is no appropriate time for a comedy this poorly conceived. Big Trouble is irresponsible filmmaking; it doesn't even justify the space for an explanation. But since reviews are my business, let me try to sort out this movie's mess.

Continue reading: Big Trouble Review

Cop Land Review


Weak
Cop Land was supposed to do for Sylvester Stallone what Pulp Fiction did for John Travolta. Alas, the movie was (rightly) ignored by audiences and shrugged off by critics, thanks to an almost complete lack of anything so much as resembling a compelling story.

The plot is so simple as to defy description: A lot of New York cops live across the water in Jersey, and it turns out they are all beholden to the mob. It's up to fat, half-deaf Sheriff Freddy (Sly) to expose this atrocity!!! Would that there were more to say, Cop Land builds its "mystery" by simply not telling you what's going on. Only after an hour or so do you piece together the whole mob angle, and then the audience realizes, "Hey, there's nothing happening here!" Note to Mangold: Watch L.A. Confidential a few times if you want to see how clever plot structure goes, not to mention throwing in a little wit here and there.

Continue reading: Cop Land Review

The Independent Review


OK

Remember that great Z-grade 1969 protest picture "Brothers Divided," about the conjoined twins drafted to serve in Vietnam?

No? How about the blaxploitation classics "Venus De Mofo" and "The Foxy Chocolate Robot?" Or the tree-hugging girlie biker flick "The Eco-Angels"? Or the midget Gidget movie "Teenie Weenie Bikini Beach"?

Those don't ring a bell? Surely you've seen at least one of the 427 movies directed by schlock filmmaker Morty Fineman over the last 38 years, right?

Continue reading: The Independent Review

Titan Ae Review


OK

Save its ambitious, eye-popping computer-generated space battle effects, 20th Century Fox's second run at Disney's animation crown is little more than another threadbare cartoon orphan story ("Dinosaur," "Anastasia," "The Lion King," etc.) dressed up in wannabe-anime style and targeted at 11-year-old boys with a toy-friendly, sci-fi storyline and a bad, bad, bad guitar rock soundtrack.

Taking place in a distant future when the Earth has been destroyed and the remnants of mankind are adrift in the galaxy, "Titan AE" follows handsome, cocky, cusp-of-manhood Cale (voice of Matt Damon), the son of a valiant military martyr in our planet's brief defense against a race of energy beings called the Drej.

The Drej blew up Earth with their giant crystalline space ship in an expensive-looking CGI sequence when Cale was just a boy, and now they're hunting what's left of humanity as we flee through the stars. What, exactly, the Drej have against us, the movie doesn't bother to explain. The fact that they look like a lava lamp versions the Terminator's skeleton signals they're bad news, so who needs to bother with, you know, motive?

Continue reading: Titan Ae Review

Dogma Review


Good

Thanks to all the is-it-or-isn't-it-blasphemy controversy surrounding "Dogma," writer-director Kevin Smith has added a tongue-in-cheek disclaimer to the opening of this renegade ribbing of the Catholic church that is so amusing ("...God has a sense of humor, just look at the platypus") it will have audiences in stitches even before the first line of dialogue.

Whether or not you'll think the movie stays this funny will depend on how sensitive you are about your position on the religious yardstick, your threshold for soapbox pontification and what it takes to gross you out.

Smith, the maverick Generation X satirist responsible for ragtag underground hits "Clerks" and "Chasing Amy," makes no bones about testing the limits of irreverence and good taste in this ironically snappy and smart-mouthed theological deliberation.

Continue reading: Dogma Review

Janeane Garofalo

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Janeane Garofalo Movies

Ratatouille Movie Review

Ratatouille Movie Review

A fine red wine only gets better with age. Long before that cork is popped...

The Wild Movie Review

The Wild Movie Review

You will not find a worse movie in Walt Disney's animated canon than The Wild....

What Planet Are You From? Movie Review

What Planet Are You From? Movie Review

It's always a shame to see great comedic minds fall so far from the mark....

Wonderland (2003) Movie Review

Wonderland (2003) Movie Review

It takes a bold filmmaker to splash the legend of John Holmes (aka porn star...

The Minus Man Movie Review

The Minus Man Movie Review

I'm still trying to figure out how to look at The Minus Man. Either...

Big Trouble Movie Review

Big Trouble Movie Review

Much has been said about Big Trouble, another film meant for a near-September 11th release...

Romy and Michele's High School Reunion Movie Review

Romy and Michele's High School Reunion Movie Review

With more Go-Go's songs than any other film this year, Romy and Michele's High School...

The Independent Movie Review

The Independent Movie Review

Mockumentary about the movie business? Okay, not original in any sense of the word, but...

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