Jane Alexander

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New York Philharmonic Concert of Show Boat

Jane Alexander and Fred Willard - The New York Philharmonic concert version of Show Boat, held at Avery Fisher Hall at Lincoln Center. at Avery Fisher Hall at Lincoln Center, - New York, New York, United States - Thursday 6th November 2014

Fred Willard and Jane Alexander
Jane Alexander and Fred Willard
Fred Willard and Jane Alexander

Mr Morgan's Last Love Trailer


Matthew Morgan is living in the romantic city of Paris after retiring from his teaching post as a philosophy professor. Despite having lived in France for some time, his knowledge of the language remains limited and so he more or less remains solitary since the tragic death of his beloved wife. However, soon he meets young Pauline Laubie, a dance teacher who also feels tremendously alone in her life and the pair develop an unusual bond of friendship. Their relationship is tested when she discovers that he has a son, with Matthew having never spoken about him. It soon becomes clear that he's struggling deeply to come to terms with his wife's death and is in dire need of a loving relationship once again no matter how platonic. Will he manage to find a way through his heartbreak with his new friend? Or do some wounds run too deep?

Continue: Mr Morgan's Last Love Trailer

Mr. Morgan's Last Love Review


Good

Complex emotions and a gentle exploration of interpersonal connections make this Paris-set drama worth a look, especially since it's so nicely played by the eclectic cast. German filmmaker Sandra Nettlelbeck (Mostly Martha) lets the story unfold slowly and steadily, getting deep under the skin of the characters in the process. The draggy pace sometimes makes the two-hour running time feel very long indeed, but it lets the cast to take the time to create rich, detailed connections that are easy to identify with.

It's been three years since Matthew Morgan (Michael Caine) buried his wife Joan (Jane Alexander) in a cemetery in Paris, their chosen home. Now he imagines her everywhere he goes, feeling her absence all the time until he runs into the young dance instructor Pauline (Clemence Poesy). Not only does she remind him of Joan, but he fills a gap left in her life after her father died. So the two begin an offbeat friendship that feels more like family than anything else. Even so, Matthew's loneliness sparks a visit from his son Miles (Justin Kirk) and daughter Karen (Gillian Anderson), who's too busy to stay for very long. They of course don't trust Pauline. And as she witnesses Matthew's interaction with them, she begins to understand that he has never related to them as a father.

While the premise sets things up for a whole lot of healing and sentimentality, the script avoids this by remaining earthy and raw, digging deep into the characters without trying to explain everything they are doing or thinking. There certainly isn't a right way to mend the problems between Matthew and his children, although it's clear that a bit of openness and respect will go a long way. Caine plays this beautifully, with a spark of wry humour alongside Matthew's relentless pain. His scenes with Poesy have a delicate chemistry that is refreshingly difficult to fully understand, and yet it feels authentic. And when Miles enters their world, things shift in even more interesting directions.

Continue reading: Mr. Morgan's Last Love Review

Opening Night of Lady Day at Emerson's Bar and Grill - Arrivals

Jane Alexander - Opening night of Lady Day at Emerson's Bar and Grill at the Circle in the Square Theatre - Arrivals. - New York, New York, United States - Sunday 13th April 2014

Jane Alexander
Jane Alexander

The National Audubon Society's Annual Dinner

Jane Alexander - The National Audubon Society's Annual Dinner honoring Dan W. Lufkin and Patrick F. Noonan at The Plaza Hotel - New York, New York, United States - Monday 27th January 2014

Jane Alexander
Jane Alexander
Jane Alexander
Kelly Rutherford and Jane Alexander
Jane Alexander

Picture - Jane Alexander , Sunday 13th January 2013

Jane Alexander Opening night of 'Picnic' at the American Airlines Theatre - Arrivals Featuring: Jane Alexander Where: New York, United States When: 13 Jan 2013

Picture - Jane Alexander , Sunday 13th January 2013

Jane Alexander Opening night of 'Picnic' at the American Airlines Theatre - Arrivals Featuring: Jane Alexander Where: New York City, NY, United States When: 13 Jan 2013

Dream House Review


Grim
There's an intriguing idea here, but this thriller feels like it has been compromised in the test-screening phase, resulting in a badly muddled plot. And even a lot of talent in front of and behind the camera can't rescue it.

Will (Craig) has just quit his job as a Manhattan editor to spend more time with his wife (Weisz) and young daughters (Geare and Geare) in their suburban home. But something isn't right. A suspicious man (Koteas) is lurking in the night, while the ex-husband (Csokas) of the neighbour (Watts) across the street oozes pure rage. Then Will starts to realise that nothing is what it seems to be. And he'll need to face reality if he hopes to sort things out.

Continue reading: Dream House Review

Gigantic Review


Excellent
This gentle romance is so wilfully quirky that it will drive some audiences a bit crazy. But if you can connect to the film's warmth and the humanity of its characters, it really gets under the skin.

Brian (Dano) is a 28-year-old who sells upscale mattresses and dreams of adopting a Chinese baby. His latest customer is the eccentric, large Al Lolly (Goodman), whose daughter Happy (Deschanel) strikes up a friendship that quickly turns into a sort of romance. But she's a bit skittish about the adoption thing, not to mention meeting his parents (Asner and Alexander) and much-older brothers (Roberts and Stanton). Meanwhile, a homeless man (Galifianakis) seems to be trying to kill him.

Continue reading: Gigantic Review

Gigantic Review


Weak
If you're going to make a film about two people falling in love, having two likable lead actors is an excellent place to start. For director Matt Aselton's first-time effort, Paul Dano and Zooey Deschanel fit the bill just fine. Alas, Gigantic isn't on par with their on-screen charms, letting down them -- and us.

There's certainly enough promise on hand -- quirky characters, quiet pacing, quick and unforced wit -- but it appears Aselton would rather go for disaffected style than narrative substance. And that unfortunately cheats some fine performances and, at its core, some wonderful larger ideas.

Continue reading: Gigantic Review

The Unborn Review


Unbearable
In a world bereft of rationality, such as that of popular Hollywood, Odette Yustman could play the slightly-younger sister (or, heck, even twin) of somebody like Jessica Alba, and it's fitting that their careers seem to be synching up. Almost a year to the day after Alba started seeing ghosts from a pair of haunted peepers in The Eye, Yustman begins seeing ghosts because -- well, gosh, I don't know why -- in David S. Goyer's sophomore effort as writer/director, The Unborn.

Yustman plays Casey Beldon, a college student who suddenly begins seeing scorpions in her eggs, dogs with masks, and all sorts of other crazy things. Her doctor gives her the boring reason: genetic mosaicism, a retinal irregularity usually seen in twins. It takes her Holocaust-survivor grandmother (Jane Alexander) to root out the real, much more evil reason, and, as per usual, the Nazis are involved. The reason that creepy blue-eyed zombie child keeps following her around has something to do with experiments done on Casey's great uncle in Auschwitz that naturally turned him into a mythical Jewish demon named Dybbuk. And it's up to Gary Oldman, as a Rabbi, to exorcize the malicious bugger.

Continue reading: The Unborn Review

Kramer vs. Kramer Review


Excellent
Back in the late '70s, a wave of divorce swept across America, perhaps the first big mainstream reflection of the women's lib movement that had blossomed a few years earlier. All my friends' parents seemed to break up, and so did Dustin Hoffman and Meryl Streep in Kramer vs. Kramer, a zeitgeisty melodrama that fits right in with all the Upper East Side Woody Allen flicks of that era, only with lawyers instead of laughs. Showered with awards, including nine Oscar nominations and five wins, including Best Picture, it remains one of the most compelling films of the decade, even if time has tarnished a bit of its sheen.

Hard-driving and oblivious ad exec Ted Kramer (Hoffman, more jittery than usual) is blindsided when his alarmingly fragile wife Joanna suddenly abandons him and their six-year old son Billy (Justin Henry), claiming that she needs to go to California to, you know, "find herself." Clearly a woman on the verge of a nervous breakdown, she hands over the keys, the credit cards, and the dry-cleaning tickets and disappears, leaving Ted to answer Billy's question: "Where's Mommy?"

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Feast Of Love Review


Good
In Godard's Contempt, Michel Piccoli explains the depth of his love for Brigitte Bardot as "totally... tenderly... tragically." The characters in Robert Benton's autumnal meditation on the meaning of love, Feast of Love, all dive into love with blinders on like Piccoli, drowning in their own respective seas of love.

Bradley (Greg Kinnear) is an affable, eternally optimistic schlimazel who runs Jitters, a tiny coffee shop in an Oregon college town, a guy that burbles out statements like, "I think love is everything; the only meaning we have to this crazy dream." Bradley is so likeable and easygoing that he is ripe to be trampled upon by the love beast and he is. Twice. First, his wife Kathryn (Selma Blair) leaves him for another woman. He then falls head over heels in love with cool-drink-of-water real-estate agent Diana (Radha Mitchell), who ends up marrying Bradley, despite her continuing to engage in carnal relations with David (Billy Burke). Bradley relates his stretch of news from the lovelorn to his friend Harry (Morgan Freeman), Harry calmly telling Bradley, "At least this time it's with a guy."

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Fur: An Imaginary Portrait of Diane Arbus Review


Weak
Diane Arbus made a name for herself by trying to make the normal look peculiar and vice versa. Many of her pictures detail "freaks" in very calm, classical poses and spaces. When Steven Shainberg got the notion to cook up a fictional story about how Arbus got her inspiration for her photographic portraits, this had to be on his mind. Somehow, this notion creates an inventive misfire.

Shainberg imagines Arbus, played by Nicole Kidman, as a faithful housewife, very self-conscious of her strange stares and off-putting manner. She's also a devoted assistant to Allan (a superb Ty Burr), her photographer husband who captures the poppy pastel colors of 1950s dresses and various appliances for catalogs. Her life gets a shock of electricity when she catches the eye of a strange neighbor named Lionel (Robert Downey Jr.). Lionel was featured in a freak show when he was younger as a dog boy, scientifically diagnosed as hypertrichosis. The relationship that builds between Arbus and her hairy friend accounts for her artistic awakening and liberation of feminine constraints.

Continue reading: Fur: An Imaginary Portrait of Diane Arbus Review

Brubaker Review


Weak
Full of gushing late-1970s idealism, Brubaker cuts a portrait of Henry Brubaker, a real-life prison reformer who uncovered a little nastiness in a southern prison system. Robert Redford is memorable in the titular role, but the melodramatics are a bit much to wade through at times. Watch also for a young Morgan Freeman, nearly unrecognizable.
Jane Alexander

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