James Rebhorn

James Rebhorn

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Stars Pay Tribute To 'Terrific' Homeland Actor James Rebhorn


James Rebhorn

Actor James Rebhorn, best known for playing Carrie Mathison's father on 'Homeland,' has died aged 65. Rebhorn was diagnosed with melanoma in 1992 though continued to work until last month.

James RebhornJames Rebhorn Has Died

His agent Dianne Busch told the Hollywood Reporter that Rebhorn died at his home in South Orange, New Jersey. 

Continue reading: Stars Pay Tribute To 'Terrific' Homeland Actor James Rebhorn

'Homeland' Actor Dies - James Rebhorn Passes Aged 65


James Rebhorn

James Rebhorn’s contemporaries and peers have been paying tribute following the Homeland actor’s death. He died at the age of 65 at his home on March 21, 2014, after a long battle with melanoma, which he had been diagnosed with in 1992.

James RebhornJames Rebhorn died in his New Jersey home

The celebrated actor’s career spanned 5 decades and included film roles in My Cousin Vinny, Carlito's Way, Basic Instinct, Independence Day and Meet the Parents, while most recently, he was known for his role in the hit U.S drama, Homeland, which forged a strong following in the U.K on Channel 4. He played Frank Mathison, the father of Claire Danes' CIA officer Carrie Mathison.

Continue reading: 'Homeland' Actor Dies - James Rebhorn Passes Aged 65

Homeland Star James Rebhorn Dies Aged 65 After Lengthy Cancer Battle


James Rebhorn Claire Danes

James Rebhorn, the character actor who was first diagnosed with melanoma in 1992 though fought it for over two decades, has died aged 65. The actor who played the father of Claire Danes' CIA officer Carrie Mathison on Homeland, passed away on Friday, according to the Hollywood Reporter.

James RebhornJames Rebhorn has sadly passed away

"He died from melanoma, which had been diagnosed in 1992," his agent Dianne Busch stated. "He fought it all this time. He died Friday afternoon at his home in New Jersey, where he had been receiving hospice care for a week and a half."

Continue reading: Homeland Star James Rebhorn Dies Aged 65 After Lengthy Cancer Battle

Veteran Actor And 'Homeland' Star James Rebhorn Dies Aged 65


James Rebhorn

James Rebhorn, who has appeared in over 100 films, television shows and stage productions, has died aged 65.

The late actor was last seen playing the father of CIA officer Carrie Mathison (Claire Danes) on 'Homeland'.

Rebhorn passed away on Friday (March 21st) in his home due to suffering from skin cancer.

Continue reading: Veteran Actor And 'Homeland' Star James Rebhorn Dies Aged 65

Photo Call For New Play: Too Much Too Much Too Many

Phyllis Somerville and James Rebhorn - Photo Call for New Play: Too Much Too Much Too Many, held at the Roundabout Theatre. - New York, New York, United States - Thursday 10th October 2013

Phyllis Somerville and James Rebhorn
Sheryl Kaller, Luke Kirby, Rebecca Henderson, Phyllis Somerville, James Rebhorn and Meghan Kennedy
Luke Kirby, Rebecca Henderson, Phyllis Somerville and James Rebhorn
Luke Kirby, Rebecca Henderson, Phyllis Somerville and James Rebhorn
Luke Kirby, Sheryl Kaller, Rebecca Henderson, Phyllis Somerville, James Rebhorn and Meghan Kennedy
Phyllis Somerville and James Rebhorn

Real Steel Review


OK
Undemanding audiences will love this rousing father-son tale of redemption set amid the cacophonous crashing of boxing robots. But the script is seriously contrived, and the movie is directed without even an inkling of subtlety.

In the near future, Charlie (Jackman) is an ex-boxer who now controls massive robots that have taken over the sport. A stubborn failure buried in debt, he has no interest in his 11-year-old son Max (Goyo), whose mother has just died, but agrees to care for him until his rich aunt and uncle (Davis and Rebhorn) return from holiday. But Max is far more savvy with robots than his dad. And with the help of Dad's lovelorn pal Bailey (Lilly), Max defies Charlie's expectations with his scrapheap robot Atom.

Continue reading: Real Steel Review

Real Steel Trailer


Charlie Kenton is a former boxer who finds he's given a huge opportunity to make something of his life when he and his estranged son team up to build a robot to fight in a new extreme sport called robot boxing, a hi-tech sport that's become one of the most profitable forms of entertainment in the world.

Continue: Real Steel Trailer

The Box Review


OK
Based on a Richard Matheson story, this film is another flight of fancy for Donnie Darko director Kelly. While it's fascinating and twisty, with a wonderfully creepy atmosphere, it's also pretentious and overwrought.

In 1976 Virginia, Norma and Arthur (Diaz and Marsden) are quietly struggling to keep their lives on an even keel while their teen son Walter (Stone) notices something's up. Then a facially deformed stranger (Langella) appears with a box topped by a button and a tantalising offer: push the button and earn $1 million, the hitch being that someone you don't know will die as a result. But Norma and Arthur are sucked down into the stranger's rabbit hole when their initial moral dilemma becomes something much more sinister and confusing.

Continue reading: The Box Review

The NY Preimere Of The Box At AMC Lincoln Square

James Rebhorn Wednesday 4th November 2009 The NY Preimere of the Box at AMC Lincoln Square New York City, USA

James Rebhorn

The Box Trailer


Watch the trailer for The Box

Continue: The Box Trailer

The Creative Coalition And Washington Life Magazine Present The World Premiere Of 'An American Affair' At The Landmark Cinema - Arrivals

James Rebhorn Tuesday 24th February 2009 The Creative Coalition and Washington Life Magazine present the World Premiere of 'An American Affair' at the Landmark Cinema - Arrivals Washington DC, USA

How To Eat Fried Worms Review


Weak
Remember cute little Hallie Kate Eisenberg, the curly-haired "Pepsi girl" who pretty much charmed the pants off of everybody? Yeah, well, she's 14 years old now, and, let me put it nicely, she's got a bit of a Haley Joel Osment/Macauley Culkin-as-grown-ups thing going on. Let's just hope she stays off the sauce, because even though she may have utterly lost that precociousness, she at least has a shot to stay out of rehab.

Oh yeah, and there's this movie she's in, an adaptation of the beloved 1973 novel How to Eat Fried Worms. I remember loving this book when I was a kid, but today I can't really remember the actual plot (except there was a lot of worm-eatin' in it). Maybe that's for the best. The word is that the film has taken some liberties with the book, but aside from modernizing the story, I couldn't really tell you what was different.

Continue reading: How To Eat Fried Worms Review

Carlito's Way Review


Extraordinary
Spitting in the face of the idea that criminals are simply nurtured by their environments, legendary gangster Carlito Brigante (Al Pacino, doing a vague approximation of a Puerto Rican accent) stands before a judge in the 1993 Brian De Palma film Carlito's Way and refuses to blame his criminal ways on his upbringing or the fact that his mother died when he was young: "The fact is, your honor, I was a mean little bastard when she was alive."

It's a rebuke to the environment-nurtures-criminals mentality that infused the previous De Palma/Pacino collaboration from 10 years earlier, Scarface, which stands as the bloody and exciting but frankly pretty immature younger brother to the more stately and ultimately more affecting Carlito's Way. The differences are obvious right from the film's opening gunshot: Carlito's been popped and is being wheeled away to the hospital, musing as he dies, "Don't take me to no hospital... Some bitch always pops you at midnight when all they got is a Chinese intern with a wooden spoon." The rest of the film is in flashback, starting with Carlito being let out of jail after serving only five years of a 30-year-sentence and leading back up to that gunshot.

Continue reading: Carlito's Way Review

The Talented Mr. Ripley Review


Excellent
Few enough people know that The Talented Mr. Ripley is based on Patricia Highsmith's 1955 novel of the same name. Fewer still know they already made one movie about Mr. Ripley, a little French number called Purple Noon (1960). (Even fewer have seen the Ripley study called The American Friend (1977).)

If you happen to be one of a handful who has seen Noon, The Talented Mr. Ripley is retreading old ground. It's actually different. In fact, it's very different. So much so that with the exception of a few brief scenes and the overall theme, these two films could be based on different source material. What's really astonishing is that both are excellent films.

Continue reading: The Talented Mr. Ripley Review

Snow Falling On Cedars Review


Weak
The transformation of an intricate novel into a successful film can be a daunting task. Filmmakers must effectively generate symbolism and imagery onto the screen, instead of allowing the readers to interpret it for themselves. That's why people are always saying that a movie was never as good as the book.

Unfortunately, Snow Falling on Cedars, directed by Scott Hicks (Shine), is a prime example of an unsuccessful interpretation of a tremendous novel.

Continue reading: Snow Falling On Cedars Review

James Rebhorn

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James Rebhorn

Date of birth

1st September, 1948

Date of death

21st March, 2014

Occupation

Actor

Sex

Male

Height

1.90


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