James Purefoy

James Purefoy

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Equity Trailer


Naomi Bishop is a senior investment banker who works in the male dominated world of Wall St Finance, and who quickly becomes involved in a world of corruption and scandal. In 'Equity', Bishop misses out on an opportunity for a promotion in her company when it becomes apparent that she miscalculated the IPO's (Initial Public Offering) value and didn't handle the going public news effectively, as a result she needs to prove herself once again. This leads to her courting the promising newcomers in order to get her foot in the door and spot a potential business opportunity.

Continue: Equity Trailer

High-Rise Review

Weak

After a string of award-winning arthouse hits like Kill List and A Field in England, director Ben Wheatley and writer Amy Jump stumble with this adaptation of the 1970s J.G. Ballard novel. The satirical dystopian setting offers buckets of eye-popping visual style, plus outrageously twisted characters the A-list cast have a lot of fun sinking their teeth into. But while the themes are strong, the people on screen are so aggressively loathsome that it's not an easy movie to watch.

It's set in a brutal concrete tower within commuting distance of London, where new resident Robert (Tom Hiddleston) is learning his way around the building's modern, self-contained design. He especially enjoys flirting with his sexy upstairs neighbour Charlotte (Sienna Miller). But the building has a social structure that is creating some serious tension. Wealthy residents like the tower's architect Anthony (Jeremy Irons) live at the top, while economically struggling families like Helen and Richard (Elisabeth Moss and Luke Evans) are closer to the ground, with middle-class families in between. So when the lower floors lose their supply of water and electricity, they revolt against the upper classes, waging all-out war in the hallways.

The political commentary is astute and perhaps even more timely today than it was in 1975, when the novel was written and when the film is set. And each of the characters is full of energy and anger. So it's frustrating that the choppy editing style seems to lose track of people and plot-threads as it shifts around to various angles on the action. This makes all of the violence and sex feel oddly random and excessive, as things get increasingly nasty and each of the people loses the audience's sympathy. Hiddleston has terrific presence, but the film kind of abandons him along the way. While Irons is hamming it up shamelessly, Evans is inexplicably brutal and both Moss and Miller are little more than victims.

Continue reading: High-Rise Review

High-Rise Trailer


'If only we had enough money to move to a bigger house', an ongoing predicament in most households around the world. Just a little more space, just a little more comfort.  Robert Laing is a young doctor who's currently embracing the single life. 

Robert thinks that a beautiful closed off high-rise apartment is just the place for him to make a home. His flat is located on the twenty-fifth floor which is somewhere in the middle and as Robert settles in and is introduced to his new neighbours, he soon begins to realise that there's a hierarchy within the building -the higher the floor you're on, the more your life is worth. 

The higher you go in the 40-odd floored building, the more palatial your surroundings become. Somehow the man behind the design of the building appears to hold more answers than he's willing to give. Lines are soon crossed and war breaks out between the self-imposed floor class system. 

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Roger Deakins , Isabella James Purefoy Ellis - The Film Is GREAT reception at Fig & Olive - Arrivals at Fig & Olive - West Hollywood, California, United States - Friday 26th February 2016

James Purefoy and Roger Deakins
James Purefoy and Roger Deakins
James Purefoy and Roger Deakins

James Purefoy, Christina Hendricks , Michael K. Williams - Sundance TV Celebrates the Launch of Original Scripted Series "HAP AND LEONARD" held at Hill Country NYC - Hill Country BBQ - New York, New York, United States - Friday 26th February 2016

James Purefoy, Christina Hendricks and Michael K. Williams
Jimmi Simpson, James Purefoy, Christina Hendricks, Pollyanna Mcintosh and Michael K. Williams
James Purefoy
James Purefoy
Christina Hendricks and James Purefoy

Momentum Review

OK

With a plot so thin that it's barely there, this sleek South African action thriller is surprisingly entertaining simply because the cast is allowed to chomp merrily on the scenery as they try to torment and kill each other. And even though the film's tone is relentless machismo, this is a rare thriller with a female leading character. So there's a bit of attitude and wry humour to undermine the otherwise sadistic violence.

It opens in Cape Town with a ludicrously over-planned bank heist that goes wrong simply because the robbers are all hothead thugs. The gang leader is Alex (Olga Kurylenko), and her clash with one of her cohorts leaves her team in disarray. She's also on the run from Mr. Washington (James Purefoy), the viciously swaggering henchman of top American boss the Senator (Morgan Freeman). It quickly becomes clear that Washington isn't trying to recover the diamonds stolen from the bank vault; he wants a mysterious memory stick instead. After Alex turns to a cohort (Brendan Murray) and a former love-rival (Lee-Anne Summers) for help, she leads Washington on a spectacularly grisly cat and mouse chase across the city.

Cameraman-turned-director Stephen Campanelli certainly knows how to make a movie that looks achingly cool. There isn't a moment when anyone moves or speaks like a normal human being: they strut, pose, shout, leer, scowl and taunt. And of course they all look great doing it. Kurylenko is a steely presence at the centre of the action, with a character intriguing enough to hold the interest even if Campanelli hadn't forced her to do most of her biggest scenes in a state of undress. Purefoy is clearly having a great time deliciously playing with his character's verbose speeches and grisly actions. And even Freeman gets to chew on some scenery in his few scenes.

Continue reading: Momentum Review

James Purefoy and son Joe - Charlie and the Chocolate Factory Press night at Theatre Royal - London, United Kingdom - Wednesday 26th June 2013

James Purefoy and Son Joe
James Purefoy

Joseph Purefoy and James Purefoy - Charlie and the Chocolate Factory - After Party held at Great Connaught Rooms - London, United Kingdom - Tuesday 25th June 2013

James Purefoy and Joseph Purefoy

James Purefoy and Joseph Purefoy - Charlie and the Chocolate Factory - press night held at the Theatre Royal - Arrivals. - London, United Kingdom - Tuesday 25th June 2013

James Purefoy and Joseph Purefoy
James Purefoy and Joseph Purefoy
James Purefoy and Joseph Purefoy
James Purefoy

Kissing Kevin Bacon: The Following Co-Star James Purefoy Tells All


Kevin Bacon James Purefoy

Kevin Bacon's The Following is currently one of the hottest shows on TV right now, with audiences lapping up to gorefest that is the new Fox thriller. In a recent interview with Vulture, Bacon's co-star James Purefoy discussed his role and the one scene in particular that has women all over going green with envy.

Purefoy, who plays killer Joe Carroll, questioned why the subject of violence in the media is such a heavily discussed topic, citing Shakespeare's King Lear and Titus Andronicus as some of the most gruesome examples he could think of. He said: "I'm surprised that in a society, in a culture that's been watching violence on film, television, and stage for two and a half thousand years, anyone brings it up anymore."

As for his kiss with Bacon, James took the whole thing very lightheartedly, saying, "Yeah, I just remember his tongue flicking gently into my mouth. So forward of him. And in front of all those people. I thought what we had was private." If that kind of description doesn't get ladies swooning then who knows what will.

Continue reading: Kissing Kevin Bacon: The Following Co-Star James Purefoy Tells All

Solomon Kane - Trailer Trailer


Solomon Kane is a formidable warrior, brutal and unrelenting destroying anything and everything that stands in his way. However, one day, his decision to pillage a castle with his ruthless army ends up with all except Solomon being easily slaughtered by demons. It is only when he narrowly escapes his soul being taken by the Devil's reaper that he realises that he's doomed to hell unless he renounces his violent ways in exchange for a life of peace. It is not a long lasting decision, however, as he soon finds himself facing another challenge; when mankind is threatened by an invasion of Crowthorns he must choose whether to fight or let the creatures pick of the people of the world one by one - killing some, turning the weak into slaves and the strong into murderers. His choice is easily made when he witnesses the slaughter of a family of puritans he has become close to and the kidnap of their daughter. He will lay down his soul to fight for the right reasons, even when that leads him to face hell for a second time.

'Solomon Kane' is the hellish 16th century based fantasy adventure from the 1896 to 1950s Pulp magazine character created by Robert E. Howard in 1928; a man who is better known for creating the character Conan the Barbarian. It has been adapted and directed by Michael J. Bassett ('Deathwatch', 'Wilderness') and has only just reached US movie theaters.

Starring: James Purefoy & Robert Orr.

John Carter Review


Excellent
While trailers make this look like an effects-heavy sci-fi mess, the film is actually a rollicking adventure firmly centred on characters rather than the creatures or action. It's an involving, strikingly well-made action drama.

At the end of the American Civil War, John Carter (Kitsch) is in Arizona looking for gold when a strange artefact in a cave transports him to Mars, known locally as Barsoom. Getting used to the lower gravity is one thing, but he's soon captured by green, 15-foot-tall Tharks, who have four limbs plus tusks on the sides of their faces. He earns the respect of leader Tars Tarkas (Dafoe), but when he rescues Helium's Princess Dejah (Collins), he ends up in the middle of the war between red human kingdoms Helium and Zodanga.

Continue reading: John Carter Review

Ironclad Review


OK
Turning a rarely dramatised chapter of British history into a riotously grisly romp, this film starts out strongly as an exploration of people power then soon degenerates into a series of increasingly gory clashes.

After signing the Magna Carta in 1215, King John (Giamatti) launches a bloodbath of revenge against the barons who forced his signature. So Marshall (Purefoy), a Templar monk who has taken a vow of nonviolence, is forced to take up his sword to defend the people from their king. He joins a rabble mob led by charismatic Albany (Cox) and they head for the pivotal castle of Lord Cornhill (Jacobi). As the king lays siege to their stronghold, Marshall finds other vows tempted by Lady Isabel (Mara) and her heaving bosom.

Continue reading: Ironclad Review

Resident Evil Review


Weak
The best part of playing the Resident Evil video games was the suspense - moving through the shadowy hallways, twitchy in the knowledge that at any moment a zombie (human or otherwise) would leap out to chomp on your neck or leg. And better yet, you'd have your trusty shotgun in hand to blow that dirty ghoulie out of your path.

But while the Resident Evil games may have set new standards for thrills, suspense, and gore for video games, the movie really only succeeds in the third of these. Instead of creating real tension, it barrages you with false suspense and really loud, fast-paced techno metal (score by Marilyn Manson) to give the sense you should be scared. And when all else fails, gross the audience out. Worse, there's not a drop of comic relief in sight.

Continue reading: Resident Evil Review

Mansfield Park Review


OK

The latest Jane Austen novel lovingly adapted to film, "Mansfield Park" features a predictably resolute heroine named Fanny Price, a 10-year-old girl from a poor family who is sent to live with wealthy relations at their country estate.

The first thing her aunt says to her is "Let's have a look at you...Well, I'm sure you have other qualities." When her uncle thinks she's out of earshot, he tells his daughters, "she's not your equal," and he insists she live in the servants' wing to prevent her from tempting her male cousins. Nonetheless, young Edmund takes a shine to her and makes her feel at home, which is the beginning of a life-long friendship.

Well, I think we all know where this is going. As witty and wildly engaging as Austen's coy 18th Century romances are, they're nothing if not predictable.

Continue reading: Mansfield Park Review

James Purefoy

James Purefoy Quick Links

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James Purefoy

Date of birth

3rd June, 1964

Occupation

Actor

Sex

Male

Height

1.85




James Purefoy Movies

Equity Trailer

Equity Trailer

Naomi Bishop is a senior investment banker who works in the male dominated world of...

High-Rise Movie Review

High-Rise Movie Review

After a string of award-winning arthouse hits like Kill List and A Field in England,...

High-Rise Trailer

High-Rise Trailer

'If only we had enough money to move to a bigger house', an ongoing predicament...

Momentum Movie Review

Momentum Movie Review

With a plot so thin that it's barely there, this sleek South African action thriller...

Solomon Kane - Trailer Trailer

Solomon Kane - Trailer Trailer

Solomon Kane is a formidable warrior, brutal and unrelenting destroying anything and everything that stands...

John Carter Movie Review

John Carter Movie Review

While trailers make this look like an effects-heavy sci-fi mess, the film is actually a...

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John Carter Trailer

John Carter Trailer

Civil War veteran John Carter wakes up in a strange, barren land with no idea...

Ironclad Movie Review

Ironclad Movie Review

Turning a rarely dramatised chapter of British history into a riotously grisly romp, this film...

Resident Evil Movie Review

Resident Evil Movie Review

The best part of playing the Resident Evil video games was the suspense - moving...

Bedrooms & Hallways Movie Review

Bedrooms & Hallways Movie Review

Gay guys whining about their complicated sex lives may be wearing a bit thin as...

Vanity Fair Movie Review

Vanity Fair Movie Review

Surprisingly, "Legally Blonde's" very modern Reese Witherspoon seems quite at home in the 19th Century...

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