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Colin Firth Takes Sailing Lessons For Film Role


Colin Firth Rachel Weisz Kate Winslet James Marsh

Colin Firth was last seen saving the world as veteran spy Harry Hart in Kingsman: The Secret Service, and now the versatile star has become a sailor in preparation for his role in a currently untitled Donald Crowhurst biopic.

Colin Firth at Kingsman New York premiereFirst Kingsman, now yachtsman for Colin Firth

Attending a yacht party at the Cannes Film Festival, the Academy Award winner told the New York Post's Page Six that he has been taking sailing lessons before filming on the drama begins in England on Monday. He revealed he will captain a "41ft trimaran" with a cabin so tight, "there's very little room to act in."

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Palm Springs Film Festival Gala 2015

James Marsh - A host of Hollywood's biggest stars were photographed as they arrived at the Palm Springs Film Festival Gala 2015 which was held at the Palm Springs Convention Center in California, United States - Sunday 4th January 2015

James Marsh

26th Annual Palm Springs International Film Festival Awards Gala

Eddie Redmayne and James Marsh - A host of Hollywood's biggest stars were photographed as they arrived at the Palm Springs Film Festival Gala 2015 which was held at the Palm Springs Convention Center in California, United States - Saturday 3rd January 2015

Eddie Redmayne and Hannah Bagshawe
Eddie Redmayne and Hannah Bagshawe
Eddie Redmayne and Hannah Bagshawe
Eddie Redmayne and Hannah Bagshawe
Eddie Redmayne and Hannah Bagshawe

Premiere of 'The Theory of Everything'

James Marsh - Premiere of 'The Theory of Everything' - London, United Kingdom - Tuesday 9th December 2014

James Marsh

The Theory of Everything premiere

James Marsh - The Theory of Everything premiere - Arrivals - London - Tuesday 9th December 2014

'The Theory of Everything' UK premiere

James Marsh - 'The Theory of Everything' UK premiere - Arrivals - London, United Kingdom - Tuesday 9th December 2014

Becoming Stephen Hawking: Eddie Redmayne Explores His Transformation For 'The Theory Of Everything'


Eddie Redmayne Stephen Hawking Felicity Jones James Marsh

It was nothing short of a daunting prospect when Eddie Redmayne was faced with the task of recreating the most intelligent human being on the planet for the forthcoming Stephen Hawking biopic 'The Theory Of Everything', but he got there.

Felicity Jones and Eddie Redmayne in 'The Theory of Everything'
Eddie Redmayne stars as Stephen Hawking in his new biopic

Stephen Hawking, while widely known for his work on theoretical physics and penning the best-selling 'A Brief History Of Time', is probably also the most recognisable scientist on the face of the Earth. This is thanks to an over 50 year struggle with the debilitating motor neuron disease, contributing to his wheelchair confinement, almost total paralysis and lack of speech; though the latter is not strictly true. Anyone with half a brain would be able to identify his robotic speech-generating device which, contrary to his Oxford roots, possessed a certain nasal twang.

Continue reading: Becoming Stephen Hawking: Eddie Redmayne Explores His Transformation For 'The Theory Of Everything'

Eddie Redmayne Joins Oscars Hunt in Stunning 'The Theory of Everything'


Eddie Redmayne James Marsh Stephen Hawking

Eddie Redmayne has garnered critical acclaim for a towering performance as Stephen Hawking in James Marsh's new British drama The Theory of Everything. Inspired by the memoir Travelling to Infinity: My Life with Stephen by his first wife Jane Hawking, the movie deals with their relationship, Hawking's diagnosis for motor neurone disease and his glittering successes in physics.

Eddie RedmayneEddie Redmayne [R] turns in a towering performance as Stephen Hawking

"But Redmayne towers: this is an astonishing, genuinely visceral performance which bears comparison with Daniel Day-Lewis in My Left Foot, said Catherine Shoard of The Guardian, "His Hawking starts askew - the glasses, maybe the shoulders a touch - and over the course of two hours contorts and buckles into a figure at once instantly familiar and fresh." Even the most amateur of movie buffs will know that Day-Lewis won his first Oscar for playing artist Christy Brown, who suffered from cerebral palsy.

Continue reading: Eddie Redmayne Joins Oscars Hunt in Stunning 'The Theory of Everything'

See Eddie Reymane as Stephen Hawking in 'The Theory Of Everything' Trailer


Eddie Redmayne Felicity Jones James Marsh Emily Watson David Thewlis

Excitement for the forthcoming British biopic, The Theory of Everything, based on the life of cosmologist and theoretical physicist Stephen Hawking has been propelled forward twice this week: firstly with a still of the two main characters, Hawking and his wife Jane, and now with a full trailer.

The Theory of Everything
The first still released from the Stephen Hawking forthcoming biopic, The Theory of Everything

Eddie Redmayne and Felicity Jones assume the roles of the two main characters and will take audiences on a journey through the early stages of Hawking’s studies and the difficulties the couple face when he is diagnosed with motor neurone disease at the age of 21.

Continue reading: See Eddie Reymane as Stephen Hawking in 'The Theory Of Everything' Trailer

The Theory Of Everything Trailer


Coming from a privileged upbringing, cosmologist and theoretical physicist Stephen Hawking naturally had a first-rate education - though no-one could expect the kind of genius and revolutionary theories that he would eventually come up with. While wowing his university professors with his baffling discoveries, he was fighting a personal battle with his rapidly deteriorating health. Whilst still studying, he began to lose the ability to walk as well as the ability to speak before being diagnosed with Motor Neurone Disease and given a two-year expect survival rate. As to be expected from one of the world's most accomplished scientists, he defied the odds and embarked on a long and fulfilling life that lasts to this day - with just a little help from the love of his youth Jane Wilde, who encouraged him to carry on speaking with the help of his trademark speech generating device.

Continue: The Theory Of Everything Trailer

Picture Released For Stephen Hawking Biopic: The Theory Of Everything


Eddie Redmayne Felicity Jones James Marsh Emily Watson David Thewlis

The first still from the forthcoming British biopic, The Theory of Everything, based on the life of brilliant physicist Stephen Hawking, has been released ahead of the film’s trailer premiere due out tomorrow (6 August). Showing its two stars, Eddie Redmayne and Felicity Jones, the still captures a tender moment between Hawking and his first wife, Jane.

The Theory of Everything
The first still has been released of the Stephen Hawking biopic, The Theory of Everything

Due to make its debut as Focus Features’ frontrunner at the Toronto International Film Festival in September this year, The Theory of Everything charts the life of a young Hawking as he begins his epic journey of discoveries within the world of physics. The film follows Hawking as a young man who enters into a relationship with Cambridge student Jane Wilde shortly before his heart-breaking motor neuron disease diagnosis at 21.

Continue reading: Picture Released For Stephen Hawking Biopic: The Theory Of Everything

Project Nim Review


Excellent
Filmmaker Marsh follows up the amazing Man on Wire with another thoroughly gripping narrative documentary, this time telling the life story of a chimpanzee that was raised as a human. And as his story twists and turns, the film has a lot to say about humans too.

Born at an Oklahoma primate centre in 1973, Nim was taken from his mother after only a few days and sent to live with the LaFarge family in New York. Headed up by Columbia professor Terrace, the project aimed to test nature versus nurture, and to see if a chimp could communicate with humans using sign language. To better control the study, Nim moved into a more controlled environment with trainers Laura and Bill, who after a few years are horrified when Nim is sent back to Oklahoma to live in a cage for the first time in his life.

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The King Review


Good
The creepy prodigal son tale The King takes a young sailor (just out of the navy) named Elvis, sends him to find his father, a born-again preacher who never married Elvis' mom (a whore), then falls in love with the preacher's teenage daughter (his half-sister), and somehow never descends into sheer idiocy. This may be pulp material, but the telling is first-rate.Elvis is played by Gael Garcia Bernal, who, in his second English-language role, absolutely walks away with the film. His Elvis is an intriguing blank from the get-go, striding off his ship and back into the world with just a small bag of clothes and a his M1 rifle (how he was able to smuggle this out of the military so easily is never quite clear). In a sharply-edited opening sequence - first-time feature director James Marsh has a tight hold on his material - Elvis heads to his childhood home of Corpus Christi, visits a hooker, buys a car, checks into a motel, and finds his father, all with the same determined yet casual expression on his face; just checking things off his list. His father, David Sandow (William Hurt, managing not to overact for once, even with the bad facial hair and deep Texas accent) is a preacher at a small church where his teenage son plays uptempo Christian rock songs and service times are announced outside on a garish red LED display. When Elvis finally confronts his estranged father, Sandow acknowledges that that was a different time in his life and tells Elvis in no uncertain terms to stay the hell away from his family.Elvis is nothing, however, if not determined. He starts shadowing the Sandows, quickly befriending, and then seducing, their 16-year-old daughter Malerie (a sunny Pell James). The fact that this is his half-sister doesn't seem to bother Elvis one bit. He's content to work his pizza delivery job, assist Malerie in some good old-fashioned pastor's daughter rebellion, and worm his way ever closer into their lives. It's easy to see how Malerie falls for Elvis. Bernal's insistently cheery and earnest demeanor would, when used to full effect, melt the iciest of hearts. It's a sublimely subtle performance, likeable to the extreme, yet showing a flicker of sociopathy every now and again to keep everything unhinged just enough.Marsh co-wrote the elegant script with Milo Addica, a co-writer on Monster's Ball, a film which shares with this one a red-state setting and certain bloody sense of fate. They aren't afraid to upturn audience expectations on a dime and to plummet very quickly into surprisingly dark places. It's a gorgeously shot film, with some of the outdoor scenes shared by Malerie and Elvis holding a sun-soaked youthful beauty that recalls Badlands. Like Malick, the filmmakers are digging at the malevolence behind the beauty, a malevolence that they unleash later on with a disturbingly calm fury.This is not to say that The King doesn't occasionally take things too far. The stabs at black humor are mostly mistimed and the film almost blows it completely by laying on the Biblical overtones with a trowel. It's not a story easily shaken, however, or easily pigeonholed, inhabiting instead a bright and evil category all its own.King and queen.

Wisconsin Death Trip Review


Excellent
Chances are you have never seen a film quite like Wisconsin Death Trip. At once a bleak documentary and an experimental fictional recreation of tragic events in a small town in Wisconsin during the 1890s, the film is unique in the way that it captures specific events and deals with larger themes about the poignancy of life and the tragedy of death.

It begins innocuously enough in the film's prologue which states, "It is safe to assume that nowhere in the length and breadth of this great continent of ours can be found a more desirable residence than Black River Falls." Then we hear what sounds like a gunshot but is in fact a camera flash, next we see the dead body of a little girl being put in a casket, then the credits come up, and next we see the awkward image from the ground looking straight up at a pair of dangling feet of a man who has hung himself. At this point it's obvious the film will take its title literally.

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