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Harrison Ford Was Told He'd Never Be A Star


Harrison Ford James Coburn

Harrison Ford was told by an unknown movie executive that he didn't have what it takes to make it in the industry at the start of his career.

The 71-year-old actor - whose career has spanned six decades and includes high profile roles in 'Indiana Jones' and the original 'Star Wars' trilogy - was told he didn't have the star quality to become successful after beginning his career as an extra in 'Dead Heat On A Merry Go Round'.

Speaking to talk show host Conan O'Brien last night (27.11.13), Harrison said: I was in a contract at Columbia Pictures for $150 a week which back then in those days was still only $150 a week. It was ridiculous. My first movie role was a bell boy, a bell man in a hotel. I delivered a note or a telegram or something to James Coburn and my lines were, 'Paging Mr Jones, Mr Jones, paging Mr Jones' and he raised his hand and I went over and said, 'Mr Jones? Room 204?' and he said, 'Yes' and I gave him the note and that was my job.

Continue reading: Harrison Ford Was Told He'd Never Be A Star

Tom Cruise To Star In Magnificent Seven


Tom Cruise Beyonce Knowles Brad Dexter Charles Bronson Doug Liman Horst Buchholz James Coburn Robert Vaughn Steve McQueen Top Gun Van Helsing Yul Brynner

Tom Cruise is attached to the 'Magnificent Seven' remake.

The 'Mission: Impossible - Ghost Protocol' actor is said to have been interested in the project - a remake of the 1960 movie - for some time, though it is unlikely to go into production for some time.

Studio MGM are currently looking for a writer for the movie, which also does not have a director attached as yet.

Continue reading: Tom Cruise To Star In Magnificent Seven

James Coburn Remembered By Wellness Garden Gift


James Coburn

Late movie star James Coburn is to be remembered with a new wellness garden his charity foundation has funded.

The James and Paula Coburn Foundation has funded the green area at the Motion Picture & Television Fund campus in Woodland Hills, California to mark the couple's dedication to health, spirituality and gardening.

Designed by Kenneth Cobonpue, the garden features a gong, a spherical continuous motion fountain, and a custom Yin-Yang pergola.

Lynda Erkiletian, the executive director of the foundation, tells WENN, "The Jpcf is delighted to provide a lasting and memorable landmark with the Wellness Garden. The Mptf is an organisation that the Coburns were very passionate about given their interests in health and giving back to the entertainment community that played such a big part in their lives.

Continue reading: James Coburn Remembered By Wellness Garden Gift

American Gun (2002) Review


Weak
James Coburn's final film went straight to video, and alas it's nothing special. American Gun tells the story of Martin Tillman, whose daughter (Virginia Madsen) is suddenly shot and killed. (On Christmas, no less.) He then does possibly the least sensible thing on earth: He goes on a nationwide journey to find out where the gun that killed her came from, and whose hands it passed through on the way to his neck of the woods. This leads him from the gun factory to the dealer to various thugs until he gets all the way back home. Putting aside the fact that it would be next to impossible to follow such a chain of ownership, we immediately wonder how a geriatric like Coburn is going to handle all this travel -- and it ain't exactly to the most scenic parts of the country.

Never mind all that, this is a journey of self-discovery, as Martin has some demons he's obviously trying to exorcise. He's got a granddaughter to atone with, a wife who's a bit distant, and a dead daughter, of course. By the end we've got a whopper of a secret in store, but still it's a little hard to swallow this Twenty Bucks-style road trip.

Continue reading: American Gun (2002) Review

The Loved One Review


Extraordinary
Decades before Six Feet Under, The Loved One skewered the paradox of the funeral business in appearance-obsessed L.A. Wildly and unpredictably funny, The Loved One careens from scene to scene so quickly you may not be able to keep up with the jokes.

And what jokes they are! The very American Robert Morse stars as a British visitor to L.A., a wannabe poet who gets caught up in the machinations of a cemetary owner (Jonathan Winters) and his top mortician (Rod Steiger in the role of a lifetime). It's more cult than cemetary, and Morse soon becomes enchanted with one the cemetary's guide/beautician/chanteuse (a dippy Anajette Comer). The film haphazardly careens from subplot to subplot, eventually settling into a set piece about a kid obsessed with rockets, which Winters sees as the solution to the problem of running out of space for "loved ones" in the cemetary (aka corpses).

Continue reading: The Loved One Review

The Last Of Shiela Review


Excellent
The odd pair of Anthony Perkins and Stephen Sondheim wrote this underseen thriller, a whodunit that puts widower James Coburn on a boat with his old friends, one of whom may have accidentally run over his wife a year ago in an unsolved hit-and-run. Is Coburn's live-action mystery game a clever way to ferret out the killer? Or is something more mysterious at work here? The body count will nearly fill a hand before a few days on the yacht are up, but it's the impressive cast and twisty script that will keep you watching to see who gets it next... and who gets away with it all.

Hudson Hawk Review


Weak
The good thing about comedies, as a general rule, is that they're too bland to have really bad plots. The search for laughs seldom strays too far off the beaten path established by the social mores of the target market, be that old ladies, stoners, or teenagers out on dates. There are comedies with solid plots, just rarely comedies with complicated plots.

What they generally aren't is full of capers designed by crackheads in search of comic relief, or a dominatrix dying to destroy the gold market with a Da Vinci alchemy machine only a cat burglar from Hoboken could steal.

Continue reading: Hudson Hawk Review

Payback Review


Excellent
"Nobody likes a monkey on their back. I had three. I was going to have to lighten the load"

Its dialogue like that that makes Payback the first great film of 1999. Everybody likes to watch jerks on screen. They walk around with a cockiness and lack of respect for anything and everyone that you can't help but love to watch them. In this movie, I think everybody falls into this category.

Continue reading: Payback Review

American Gun Review


Weak
James Coburn's final film went straight to video, and alas it's nothing special. American Gun tells the story of Martin Tillman, whose daughter (Virginia Madsen) is suddenly shot and killed. (On Christmas, no less.) He then does possibly the least sensible thing on earth: He goes on a nationwide journey to find out where the gun that killed her came from, and whose hands it passed through on the way to his neck of the woods. This leads him from the gun factory to the dealer to various thugs until he gets all the way back home. Putting aside the fact that it would be next to impossible to follow such a chain of ownership, we immediately wonder how a geriatric like Coburn is going to handle all this travel -- and it ain't exactly to the most scenic parts of the country.

Never mind all that, this is a journey of self-discovery, as Martin has some demons he's obviously trying to exorcise. He's got a granddaughter to atone with, a wife who's a bit distant, and a dead daughter, of course. By the end we've got a whopper of a secret in store, but still it's a little hard to swallow this Twenty Bucks-style road trip.

Continue reading: American Gun Review

The Great Escape Review


Excellent
Coming on the heels of John Sturges' The Magnificent Seven three years earlier, 1963's The Great Escape shows how quickly the ambitious epic can turn into a rote, readymade piece of filmmaking - a Hollywood masterpiece by design. There's a formal, somewhat stilted feel to its three-hour story about a group of imprisoned World War II officers and their struggle to break out of a Nazi P.O.W. camp, and anybody who thinks that Michael Bay is a bullying thug of a filmmaker who likes pushing people's emotions around can come here to see where he got it from. But for all its flaws, Escape has some of the most memorable moments in any war film, and some excellent performances from its ensemble cast.

Based on a true story, The Great Escape is set during the tail end of World War II, when a variety of officers from different countries were sent to Stalag Luft III, a prison camp designed to handle the most diligent escape attempts. Both fearless and duty-bound, the men spend no time with long prologues or chit-chat about what to do; they, along with the movie, immediately set to work, using the skills they know best. There's Anthony Hendley, the "scrounger" skilled at digging up needed provisions; James Garner, at his best when he's being charmingly unctuous to his Nazi captors; Charles Bronson, as the "tunnel king" Danny Velinski, offering a nice combination of two-fisted bravado and sensitive-guy neurosis; and Donald Pleasance, the British document forger, who brings a steely, proud stoicism to his role that sets the movie's emotional feel. His is the most convincing performance, which makes sense given that really did time in a German P.O.W. camp.

Continue reading: The Great Escape Review

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