James Caviezel

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Picture - James Caviezel New York City, USA, Friday 30th September 2011

James Caviezel Friday 30th September 2011 filming on the set of the new TV show 'Person of Interest' at Ebbets Field in Brooklyn New York City, USA

James Caviezel
James Caviezel
James Caviezel
James Caviezel
James Caviezel

The Stoning of Soraya M. Review


Good
Despite a slightly simplistic filmmaking style, this true story retains real force in its depiction of human cruelty in the name of religion. It's not easy to watch such horrific events, but it's so important that it cries out to be seen.

In 1986, French-Iranian journalist Freidoune Sahebjam (Caviezel) is driving through Iran when his car breaks down in an isolated village. Called "crazy" by the men, Zahra (Aghdashloo) corners him and recounts the brutal events of the preceding day. Defenceless in a society ruled by Sharia law, Zahra's niece Soraya (Marno) was the subject of a conspiracy led by her husband (Negahban), who wanted to marry a 14-year-old. To do this he had to gain the support of the local convict-turned-mullah (Pourtash) and the weak-willed mayor (Diaan).

Continue reading: The Stoning of Soraya M. Review

Picture - James Caviezel Los Angeles, USA, Monday 7th June 2010

James Caviezel Monday 7th June 2010 The LA Premiere of 'The Karate Kid' held at the Mann Village Theatre in Westwood Los Angeles, USA

James Caviezel

Outlander Review


Terrible
We are apparently in the midst of a minor Viking renaissance. In 2007, Marcus Nispel followed up his successful revamp of The Texas Chainsaw Massacre with the little seen Pathfinder. Centering on an orphaned Norsemen, the Native Americans who raised him, and their battle against returning Scandinavian hordes, it was not a box office success. Heck, one imagines that most people reading this opening paragraph don't even know the movie existed. Now comes Outlander, a surreal sci-fi link up of Alien, Predator, Species, and Beowulf. When it stays in space, it works. When it hits the ancient lands of Odin however, it flops around like fetid smoked fish.

On his way back to his home planet on a funereal mission, extraterrestrial Kainan (James Caviezel) discovers a deadly alien beast known as a Moorwen onboard his ship. It causes the vessel to crash land in Norway circa the 7th century. After getting his bearings and sending a distress signal, Kainan begins to explore the area. He is soon trapped by warrior Wulfric (Jack Huston) and taken to the fortified stronghold of King Rothgar (John Hurt) and his wild, unwieldy daughter Freya (Sophia Myles).

Continue reading: Outlander Review

I Am David Review


Terrible
Despite some recognition by minor festivals and to the joy of overprotective mothers, this story of a boy who escapes from a Bulgarian labor camp in 1952 comes as a mostly juvenile effort from people who are into sanitizing reality. Mostly it's unreal, bloodless, and boring, but as a sentimental fable designed not to shock the little ones, it can be considered a safe distraction.

Pre-teen David (Ben Tibber) has grown up a prisoner of fascists running a camp whose purpose appears to be the breaking up of rocks. His sole friend is Johannes (Jim Caviezel), an adult who mentors him as a father figure. When Johannes is shot dead over a stolen bar of soap, David is given instructions on how to escape, where to go, the advice to "trust no one," and a bag of essentials including a compass, a pocket knife, a bar of soap, and a sealed envelope for delivery to whoever meets him at his destination in Denmark.

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The Count of Monte Cristo (2002) Review


Good
The classic Monte Cristo sandwich is a rich confection -- almost inedibly so -- composed of layered ham, turkey, swiss cheese, mayonnaise, mustard, and crusty bread, all battered in egg and fried in hot grease. The diner is meant to dip this in jam before shoving it down his gullet.

The 2002 incarnation of The Count of Monte Cristo is a remarkably similar experience, full of pleasing flavors yet probably too rich for everyday consumption -- but, as with all things, I figure you'll eat it if you're hungry enough. Sure enough, in this snail-slow winter movie season, Monte Cristo is just about the best thing going. Like the sandwich, this isn't gourmet fare -- it's a crowd pleaser meant to entertain for a few brief moments, nothing more.

Continue reading: The Count of Monte Cristo (2002) Review

The Final Cut (2004) Review


Weak
Is it possible for a film to have too many ideas? Anything's possible, of course, in the realm of science fiction. By exploring an unspecified futuristic society, writer/director Omar Naim raises disturbing sci-fi conundrums in the wildly original The Final Cut. Unfortunately, he leaves the bulk of his more pressing issues in the shadows and opts to clear the guilty conscience of the film's lone protagonist.

The anti-hero of Cut is the ironically-named Alan Hakman (Robin Williams), a cutter who specializes in manipulating the Zoe footage of society's shadiest characters. Say what? Let me explain. In the future, a parent can choose to pay for their newborn to receive a Zoe implant. The device records an individual's experiences from a first-person perspective. Everything goes to tape, from potentially humiliating private experiences to the major triumphs in a person's life.

Continue reading: The Final Cut (2004) Review

The Thin Red Line Review


OK
War is hell. I think.

Terrence Malick's long-awaited and severely overhyped Line is plenty red, but it isn't thin at all. In fact, it's damn thick and dense, and it meanders about like a lazy river.

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Pay It Forward Review


OK
The very idea behind Pay It Forward -- that when someone does an enormous good deed for you should pay it "forward" to three other, unsuspecting persons -- requires what is described in the film as "an extreme act of faith in the goodness of people."

It's safe to say that your enjoyment of the film is bound by this same rule. Dyed-in-the-wool film critics like myself have been down this road once or twice before, and the enormous leap of faith it takes to convince oneself that, deep down, even "bad" people are good makes me want to reach for my DVD of A Clockwork Orange.

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Angel Eyes Review


Grim
He's an emotionless, lost soul wandering the streets and helping out strangers while looking for a clean razor and dry cleaner for his dirty overcoat. She's a pissed-off and lonely police chick who sleeps with her bulletproof vest on and enjoys beating up suspects, drinking Budweiser, and despising her abusive father. Together, these two misfits meet through some psychic mumbo-jumbo, learn to face down their inner demons, discover that true love does exist in this cruel world, and blah blah blah.

Jennifer Lopez and James Caviezel trudge with heavy hearts through the muck of suspense/drama/romantic comedy/love story Angel Eyes -- a film with an identity crisis that rivals Plato from Rebel with a Cause.

Continue reading: Angel Eyes Review

The Count of Monte Cristo Review


Good
The classic Monte Cristo sandwich is a rich confection -- almost inedibly so -- composed of layered ham, turkey, swiss cheese, mayonnaise, mustard, and crusty bread, all battered in egg and fried in hot grease. The diner is meant to dip this in jam before shoving it down his gullet.

The 2002 incarnation of The Count of Monte Cristo is a remarkably similar experience, full of pleasing flavors yet probably too rich for everyday consumption -- but, as with all things, I figure you'll eat it if you're hungry enough. Sure enough, in this snail-slow winter movie season, Monte Cristo is just about the best thing going. Like the sandwich, this isn't gourmet fare -- it's a crowd pleaser meant to entertain for a few brief moments, nothing more.

Continue reading: The Count of Monte Cristo Review

High Crimes Review


Terrible
What confidence we have in our American justice system to expose an endless procession of corrupt government officials in stupid political thrillers. High Crimes is no different. It's another military drama where some unlikely guy is arrested and charged with military crimes. Everyone knows these movies inside, outside, front, and back, but Hollywood continues to spit them out, each time using a different gimmick.

Here, the gimmick is that the attorney of the accused is his wife. She's Claire Kubik, played by Ashley Judd. This actress perspires such engaging charisma, it's a shame to see her stuck in such tedious, enormously predictable material. So it's no surprise to find that Claire is married to Tom (James Caviezel), who, unbeknownst to his wife, is an ex-military man who has a few skeletons in his closet.

Continue reading: High Crimes Review

James Caviezel

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