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James Caan - Disney & ABC TCA summer press tour held at Beverly Hilton Hotel - Arrivals - Beverly Hills, California, United States - Monday 5th August 2013

James Caan

James Caan - Disney & ABC TCA summer press tour held at Beverly Hilton Hotel - Arrivals - Los Angeles, CA, United States - Sunday 4th August 2013

James Caan
James Caan
James Caan
James Caan
James Caan
James Caan

James Caan - The Elephant family presents the Animal Ball a charity working to save the Asian Elephant from extinction in the wild held at Lancaster House, St James Palace - London, United Kingdom - Wednesday 10th July 2013

James Caan
James Caan

Aisha Caan and James Caan - Natwest UK Fashion and Textile Awards 2013 held at One Mayfair - Arrivals - London, England, United Kingdom - Thursday 23rd May 2013

Aisha Caan and James Caan
James Caan
James Caan
James Caan

James Caan and Guillaume Canet - 66th Cannes Film Festival - 'Blood Ties' - Photocall - Cannes, France - Monday 20th May 2013

James Caan and Guillaume Canet
James Caan
James Caan
James Caan
James Caan
Guillaume Canet, Clive Owen and James Caan

Marion Cotillard, Clive Owen and James Caan - 66th Cannes Film Festival -Blood Ties - premiere - Cannes, France - Saturday 1st January 2000

Marion Cotillard, Clive Owen and James Caan
Marion Cotillard
Marion Cotillard, Clive Owen and James Caan
James Caan, Zoe Saldana, Billy Crudup, Noah Emmerich, Guillaume Canet, Clive Owen, Marion Cotillard, Jamie Hector, Lili Taylor, Domenick Lombardozzi and Mark Mahoney

Clive Owen, Marion Cotillard, James Caan and Zoe Saldana - 66th Cannes Film Festival - Blood Ties - Premiere - Cannes, France - Monday 20th May 2013

Clive Owen, Marion Cotillard, James Caan and Zoe Saldana
Clive Owen, Marion Cotillard and James Caan
Clive Owen
Clive Owen and Marion Cotillard
Zoe Saldana, Billy Crudup, Noah Emmerich, Guillaume Canet, Clive Owen, Marion Cotillard and Jamie Hector
Zoe Saldana, Billy Crudup, Noah Emmerich, Guillaume Canet, Clive Owen, Marion Cotillard and Jamie Hector

James Caan - Entertainment Weekly and ABC - TV Upfronts Party at the General - Arrivals - New York City, NY, United States - Tuesday 14th May 2013

James Caan
James Caan and Linda Caan

James Caan - Candy Magazine launch party supported by Grey Goose at Il Bottaccio - London, United Kingdom - Thursday 9th May 2013

James Caan
James Caan

James Caan and Melanie Griffith - Celebrities out in Downtown Los Angeles arriving to watch the Rolling Stones in concert - Los Angeles, California, United States - Friday 3rd May 2013

James Caan and Melanie Griffith
James Caan and Melanie Griffith
James Caan
Melanie Griffith and James Caan
James Caan
James Caan

James Caan and Bailee Madison - James Caan, Bailee Madison Friday 19th October 2012 27th Annual Fort Lauderdale International Film Festival Opening Night at Gulfstream Park

James Caan and Bailee Madison
James Caan
James Caan
James Caan
James Caan
James Caan

James Caan Tuesday 5th June 2012 Celebrities outside the Trump Soho Hotel in Soho, Manhattan

James Caan
James Caan
James Caan
James Caan
James Caan
James Caan

James Caan, Clive Owen and Mila Kunis - James Caan, Mila Kunis, Clive Owen Tuesday 29th May 2012 filming 'Blood Ties' on location in Astoria Park

James Caan, Clive Owen and Mila Kunis
Billy Crudup, Clive Owen and James Caan
James Caan, Clive Owen and Mila Kunis
James Caan, Clive Owen and Mila Kunis
James Caan, Clive Owen and Mila Kunis
James Caan and Clive Owen

James Caan Thursday 17th May 2012 Ubuntu Education Fund's 2012 UK charity gala held at the Sorting Office - Arrivals.

James Caan

James Caan - James Caan and Guest Tuesday 17th April 2012 Los Angeles Premiere of Magnolia Picture's 'Marley' held at The Dome at Arclight Hollywood - Arrivals

James Caan

James Caan Thursday 5th April 2012 arriving at Jennifer Lopez's new restaurant at The Grove

James Caan

James Caan - James Caan and Aisha Caan, Tuesday 20th March 2012 at The Faberge Big Egg Hunt Grand Auction at the Royal Courts of Justice - Outside Arrivals

James Caan
James Caan
James Caan

James Caan and ITV Studios Wednesday 22nd February 2012 at the ITV studios

James Caan and Itv Studios

James Caan Monday 30th January 2012 leaves a medical building

James Caan
James Caan
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James Caan Tuesday 8th November 2011 The 1000

James Caan

The Way Of The Gun Review


Good
In case you're utterly dense and stupid (and some of my hate mail indicates that if you're reading this, you just might be), know that with a title like The Way of the Gun you are getting yourself into a very, very violent film. I do not mean a couple of cap guns and a blood pack under someone's shirt. I mean more shots fired per foot of film this side of a Rambo movie. Bring your earplugs.

This is not to say that violence can't be stylish or clever. Movies like Pulp Fiction have proven that a gun can be poetry. Or it can just be a gun. Writer/director Christopher McQuarrie (best known for writing The Usual Suspects; Gun is his directorial debut) has set out to make a Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid for the millennium. From its all-bad-guys cast (except for the girl) to the arch, black comedy to a south of the border shootout, the homage is pretty sincere. Too bad it didn't quite work out.

Continue reading: The Way Of The Gun Review

Rollerball (1975) Review


Good
Norman Jewison had a bomb in 1975 with Rollerball, a futuristic tale (set in 2018) in an era when war, poverty, nationality, and even individuality have been snuffed out. To appease the masses, a sport called rollerball has been devised -- a more brutal roller derby with motorcycles thrown in for good mix.

It's hardly 1984, but Jewison's dystopia has its moments, namely when rollerball champ Jonathan E. (James Caan) is skating around the course, thrashing his opponents into ground beef. When he squares off against evil corporate honcho Bartholomew (John Houseman, unforgettably uncomfortable in "the future"), the scenes are priceless.

Continue reading: Rollerball (1975) Review

A Bridge Too Far Review


Good
There are star-studded projects, and then there's A Bridge Too Far, a World War II movie the likes of which would cost upwards of $300 million to make today. There are lots of bridges in the film, actually: The Allies aim to capture a series of them in German-occupied Holland as part of Operation Market-Garden, a byzantine plot that would theoretically cripple the German war machine in western Europe, where Germany is already on the run. However, Allied mistakes and an unexpected amount of German firepower nip the plan in the bud. The film is more a showcase for some searing acting -- and at three hours long, there's plenty of it -- than it is a classic war film. The battle scenes just don't come across as impressively as in other films of the era -- the fact that VW Beetles with plastic tank shells on them were used in lieu of some of the Panzers is just one sign that all the budget went to that exhaustive cast list.

Chapter Two Review


Good
Possibly Neil Simon's most morbid play, James Caan plays a widower who finds love a second time in catty Marsha Mason. Their whirlwind romance comprises the over-long but occasionally funny tragicomedy, one of Simon's lesser-known works but certainly one of the films that's closest to his heart.

Elf Review


Extraordinary
On Christmas Eve, an infant crawls into Santa's sack and hitches a ride back to the North Pole. Upon finding his imported cargo, Santa passes the bundle of joy off to a paternal elf (played with care by Bob Newhart), who names the baby Buddy and raises him up to be a full-sized man in a miniature world.

The one-joke premise becomes worlds funnier once we learn that the elf in question is played with positively-charged whimsy by Will Ferrell. Best known for his ensemble work in Saturday Night Live and Old School, Ferrell has chosen the ideal project to test his skills as a leading man. And he keeps his clothes on, which means all ages are welcome (and encouraged) to attend this holiday party.

Continue reading: Elf Review

The Way Of The Gun Review


Good
In case you're utterly dense and stupid (and some of my hate mail indicates that if you're reading this, you just might be), know that with a title like The Way of the Gun you are getting yourself into a very, very violent film. I do not mean a couple of cap guns and a blood pack under someone's shirt. I mean more shots fired per foot of film this side of a Rambo movie. Bring your earplugs.

This is not to say that violence can't be stylish or clever. Movies like Pulp Fiction have proven that a gun can be poetry. Or it can just be a gun. Writer/director Christopher McQuarrie (best known for writing The Usual Suspects; Gun is his directorial debut) has set out to make a Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid for the millennium. From its all-bad-guys cast (except for the girl) to the arch, black comedy to a south of the border shootout, the homage is pretty sincere. Too bad it didn't quite work out.

Continue reading: The Way Of The Gun Review

The Gambler (1974) Review


Excellent
James Toback wrote this long-forgotten look at the gambling mind back in the early 1970s, but it remains one of the most accurate and stirring portraits of the betting mentality ever put to film.

James Caan owns the movie, as a vey charismatic English professor with a bad gambling addiction -- he borrows money from his girlfriend (Lauren Hutton), his mother, and the mob, and invariably he loses it all. Why play? Because of the thrill. In one scene, when he doubles down on 18 during a game of blackjack (for casino novices: this is absolute insanity), our antihero actually wins. Eventually, though, even the best streak goes bust, and it's in Caan's darkest hours that the movie shines the most.

Continue reading: The Gambler (1974) Review

Bulletproof Review


Bad
Adam Sandler's foray into action-hero land was ill-advised and, mercifully, short-lived. Bulletproof was his sole attempt to enter the buddy-cop genre (though he's playing the criminal to Wayans' cop here, but that's beside the point), and thank God. A few trademark Sandler gags aside, Bulletproof is so riddled with holes it's ridiculous. The good news: it's 84 minutes long.

Bottle Rocket Review


Excellent
The moment you know that Dignan's really lost it is during the trio's getaway from a not-so-daring bookstore robbery, when he excitedly states, "We're heading back to Bob's, we're gonna split up the loot, and go on the lam!"

In this hilarious first feature from writer/director Wes Anderson and screenwriter Owen Wilson, a trio of young men with questionable work ethics try in vain to become hardened criminals. Anthony (Owen's brother Luke Wilson) has just "escaped" from a voluntary mental hospital with the help of old pal Dignan (Owen), a neo-manic-depressive who's mapped out his life with felt-tip pen in a 75-year plan. Bob (Bob Musgrave) is the group's timid getaway driver whose main qualification is that he owns a car.

Continue reading: Bottle Rocket Review

Dead Simple Review


Very Good
Is James Caan in every direct-to-video flick put out these days? I guess there are only so many Godfather movies that can be made to keep his career kicking.

My sarcasm aside, Dead Simple is actually a fun little movie. While the title is a shameless riff on the classic Blood Simple, the movie is also a fun black comedy with a juicy body count. Daniel Stern stars as Frank Jacobs, a hapless motel owner, situated at the geographic center of the United States (which is otherwise a totally flat wasteland). His wife (Home Improvement's Patricia Richardson) wants nothing to do with grand designs -- to become a big country singer/songwriter. But Frank ends up in the sack with local chanteuse Julie (Lacey Kohl), wife of the local star singer Roy Baker (Caan). And then his wife ends up dead... and then the fun begins.

Continue reading: Dead Simple Review

City Of Ghosts Review


Very Good
Lest you think all actors are suddenly turning into directors, (as in George Clooney's 2002 Confessions of a Dangerous Mind) let me point out that it's not a new phenomenon (Kenneth Branagh's 1989 Dead Again). So, there's nothing extraordinary about Matt Dillon directing (and co-writing and acting in) City of Ghosts. And what he's turned in here for his theatrical film debut is a rather atmospheric journey set within the corrupt, decrepit precincts of Cambodia with plenty of opportunities for tension and intrigue.

The question is whether he developed his story to take full advantage of the setting for Asian mystery (this is the first film shot entirely in Cambodia since 1964) and the cutthroat characters that people it -- at least in fiction. Unfortunately, writer-director Dillon evokes the color and the mystery without quite managing to create gut-gripping drama. The flaw is in the content.

Continue reading: City Of Ghosts Review

The Godfather Review


Essential
I remember the first time I viewed The Godfather. It was 25 years to the day after its initial theatre release, and it was being re-realased, as many films were at the time, for their anniversary. So, trotting to the Mercer Mall General Cinemas on Route one (I literally trotted, I was without car and always looking over my shoulder for fear of getting run over by one of those infamous New Jersey drivers (of which I am a member)), I bought my ticket and proceeded to get the seat, front and center, as normal, in one of the smaller screens in the theatre. As I recall, the last movie I had watched in there was Night Falls on Manhattan with Richard Dreyfuss, Ian Holm, and Andy Garcia. I had seen the famous first moments before, knew the parodies of it back and front, but had never seen the film itself.

In Italian: Molto bene.

Continue reading: The Godfather Review

Jericho Mansions Review


Bad
What the hell?

This conflagration of Barton Fink and Melrose Place makes as close to zero sense as it gets, and that's just the beginning. It gets more baffling as it moves along.

Continue reading: Jericho Mansions Review

Eraser Review


OK
Is it just me, or is Arnold Schwarzenegger's accent getting worse? I think it is, as is his acting ability, as well as his choice of films to star in. This time it's Eraser, a big-budget, small-plot, fair-to-middling feature that continues the testosterone-infused series that Arnie's been working on since Pumping Iron.

It's the cheeseball role to end all cheeseball roles: John Kruger (Arnie) works for the Witness Relocation Program as an "identity eraser," and he answers to no one (sorta). His charge is Lee Cullen (Vanessa Williams), an executive with "Cyrez," who discovers that her company is selling next generation weapons to Russkie terrorists. The FBI uses her just to get the goods on Cyrez, and it's up to Arnie to save her hide from the bad guys, which includes turncoat fellow eraser Robert Deguerin (James Caan).

Continue reading: Eraser Review

Rollerball (1975) Review


Good
Norman Jewison had a bomb in 1975 with Rollerball, a futuristic tale (set in 2018) in an era when war, poverty, nationality, and even individuality have been snuffed out. To appease the masses, a sport called rollerball has been devised -- a more brutal roller derby with motorcycles thrown in for good mix.

It's hardly 1984, but Jewison's dystopia has its moments, namely when rollerball champ Jonathan E. (James Caan) is skating around the course, thrashing his opponents into ground beef. When he squares off against evil corporate honcho Bartholomew (John Houseman, unforgettably uncomfortable in "the future"), the scenes are priceless.

Continue reading: Rollerball (1975) Review

The Yards Review


Extraordinary
The Yards begins with a rebirth of sorts. A subway train emerges from a tunnel into daylight. It is carrying Leo Handler (Mark Wahlberg) out of the darkness and home, after his time in prison. He has taken the rap for an auto theft circle, one including close buddy Willie (Joaquin Phoenix), and is returning to a grateful homecoming. But The Yards is a dark crime drama, and Leo's future doesn't remain in the light for long in James Gray's impressive, classically styled mini-saga.

Gray, recently appearing with The Yards at the Boston Film Festival, based his tale of New York City subway vendor corruption on his own father's experiences. The filmmaker has given us a well-composed script, deftly flowing through intertwining relations of families, friends, enemies, and politicians. He sustains a hopelessly dim design throughout the film, even having the mind to steal wonderfully from a few Godfather scenes (he claims by accident), and lifting Gordon Willis' outstanding cinematography with his DP, Harris Savides (on purpose). Gray's direction gives us an overriding sense of doom that retains suspense far beyond that of a second-time filmmaker (his first being 1994's grim Little Odessa). But all that is nothing without Mark Wahlberg.

Continue reading: The Yards Review

Misery Review


Excellent
Not only is Misery the best adaptation of a Stephen King book ever made, it's the only good one ever made! (Though this may change with this year's The Green Mile.) The story of a rabid fan who imprisons her favorite writer in her remote cabin, and makes him write stuff he doesn't want to... sounds just like my day job.

Thief Review


Extraordinary
Director Michael Mann's first movie was this, the often-overlooked Thief (before his stint on Miami Vice), about a professional safecracker (Caan) and his biggest job ever... and the gangsters that he finds himself working for.

Essentially remade as Heat in 1995, Thief doesn't just focus on the job, it focuses also on the man. Caan's criminal is complex and troubled, with a sterile wife (Weld) and a dying friend (Nelson) he wants to remember. Good guys and bad guys have never been harder to peg, which is why Thief is so much fun, filled with nuance and subtlety not often found among caper flicks.

Continue reading: Thief Review

The Way Of The Gun Review


Weak

A belated, Tarantino-spawn crime caper picture packed with highly contrived, high-caliber gunplay and other bursts of meaningless creativity, "The Way of the Gun" is the gritty and stylish, but hollow and hyperbolic, directorial debut of "The Usual Suspects" screenwriter Christopher McQuarrie.

A tangled and twisty yarn of dastardly deeds and double-crosses, the plot begins with a conversation between two bodyguards charged with protecting a surrogate mother (Juliette Lewis), who is carrying a baby for a crooked L.A. millionaire and his frigid, disinterested trophy wife.

Eavesdropping are a pair of glum petty thugs (Ryan Phillippe and Benicio Del Toro) who concoct, on the spot, a scheme to kidnap the woman and ransom the unborn kid for the kind of money they always thought they deserved but could never procure with their small-time villainy.

Continue reading: The Way Of The Gun Review

The Yards Review


OK

Stylistically, "The Yards" is a vivid throwback to gritty urban dramas of the 1970s -- a character-driven morality tale, dank and moody, and photographed in dusky, cloudy, rusty hues.

Dramatically, however, its understated manner -- full of subtle unspoken expression and conflicted ethics and loyalties -- is never quite as gripping as was clearly intended.

A behind-the-scenes story of perilous corruption amongst New York City subway contractors, the picture stars the increasingly impressive Mark Wahlberg as Leo, a frayed recent parolee trying to put his life back together after taking the fall for an unnamed crime committed by a group of friends.

Continue reading: The Yards Review

Elf Review


OK

After years of specializing in playing obnoxiously oblivious nitwits, "Saturday Night Live" alum Will Ferrell has finally hit upon a role perfectly tuned to his niche talent -- an obnoxiously oblivious nitwit who, after crawling into Santa's toy bag as a baby one Christmas, grew up at the North Pole thinking he's one of the toy-making elves.

Buddy the elf's inherent kindheartedness and selfless good intentions are the saving-grace elements that Ferrell's performances have always been missing, and even though I've always had a hard time stomaching the guy, I have to admit, I loved him in "Elf."

A rare Christmas comedy that is somehow both astringently droll and full of family-friendly holiday spirit, the story begins at the North Pole where the time has come for buddy's adoptive father (the understatedly ironic Bob Newhart, also the film's storytime-style narrator) to sit the clueless and comparatively colossal 36-year-old on his lap and explain why he's three feet taller than his peers and "the only baritone in the elf choir."

Continue reading: Elf Review

James Caan

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James Caan

Date of birth

26th March, 1940

Occupation

Actor

Sex

Male

Height

1.76




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James Caan Movies

Preggoland Trailer

Preggoland Trailer

Ruth (Sonja Bennett) has found herself in a very difficult situation - all of her...

The Tale of the Princess Kaguya Movie Review

The Tale of the Princess Kaguya Movie Review

Like The Wind Rises, this Oscar-nominated Studio Ghibli animation is a proper cinematic epic, telling...

The Tale of The Princess Kaguya Trailer

The Tale of The Princess Kaguya Trailer

Once upon a time in Japan, a bamboo cutter discovered a miniature girl inside the...

Blood Ties Movie Review

Blood Ties Movie Review

While the story centres on twisted moral dilemmas, this 1970s-set thriller takes such a hesitant,...

The Outsider Movie Review

The Outsider Movie Review

Blunt and simplistic, there's not a moment in this thriller that feels inspired by anything...

Blood Ties Trailer

Blood Ties Trailer

Frank is a remarkable cop with a lot to look forward to in his life,...

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Seduced and Abandoned Movie Review

Seduced and Abandoned Movie Review

Anyone interested in how movies get made will love this feisty behind-the-scenes documentary, which uses...

Cloudy With a Chance of Meatballs 2 Movie Review

Cloudy With a Chance of Meatballs 2 Movie Review

With new writers and directors, this frenetic sequel indulges in silliness with less substance than...

Cloudy With A Chance Of Meatballs 2 Trailer

Cloudy With A Chance Of Meatballs 2 Trailer

Flint Lockwood is a genius inventor who previously caused chaos in his hometown when he...

Small Apartments Trailer

Small Apartments Trailer

Franklin Franklin is a wig-donning, Swiss wannabe loner who lives alone in a small apartment...

Small Apartments Movie Review

Small Apartments Movie Review

Relentlessly quirky and strange, this pitch black comedy manages to combine its outrageous silliness with...

Detachment Movie Review

Detachment Movie Review

An almost overpowering sense of hopelessness makes this education-system drama difficult to watch. Fortunately, it's...

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That's My Boy Trailer

That's My Boy Trailer

In his early teens, the immature and irresponsible Donny Berger struck up a brief romance...

Detachment Trailer

Detachment Trailer

Henry Barthes is a highly recommended substitute teacher, a compliment he doesn't really accept. His...

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