Jaime Pressly

Jaime Pressly

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CBS, CW And Showtime 2015 Summer TCA Party

Jaime Pressly - CBS, CW And Showtime 2015 Summer TCA Party at Pacific Design Center - Arrivals at Pacific Design Center - West Hollywood, California, United States - Tuesday 11th August 2015

Jaime Pressly
Jaime Pressly
Jaime Pressly
Jaime Pressly
Jaime Pressly and Hamzi Hijazi

CBS, The CW, and Showtime 2015 Summer TCA Party

Jaime Pressly - Celebrities attend the CBS, The CW, and Showtime 2015 Summer TCA Party at Pacific Design Center. at Pacific Design Center - Los Angeles, California, United States - Monday 10th August 2015

Jaime Pressly
Jaime Pressly
Jaime Pressly
Jaime Pressly
Jaime Pressly

Disney's VIP Halloween event

Kylie Rogers, Jaime Pressly and Dezi Calvo - A variety of stars and their children attended the Disney VIP Halloween event at Disney Consumer Productions in Los Angeles, California, United States - Wednesday 1st October 2014

Disney's VIP Halloween event at Disney Consumer Products Campus

Jaime Pressly, Jamie-Lynn Sigler, Kylie Rogers, Dezi Calvo, Beau Kyle Dykstra and Cutter Dykstra - A variety of stars and their children attended the Disney VIP Halloween event at Disney Consumer Productions in Los Angeles, California, United States - Wednesday 1st October 2014

Jaime Pressly and Minnie Mouse
Jaime Pressly
Jaime Pressly and Jamie-Lynn Sigler
Jaime Pressly, Jamie-Lynn Sigler, Kylie Rogers and Dezi Calvo

British Academy of Film and Television Arts (BAFTA) Los Angeles TV Tea

Jaime Pressly - British Academy of Film and Television Arts (BAFTA) Los Angeles TV Tea presented by BBC and Jaguar at SLS Hotel - Arrivals - Los Angeles, California, United States - Saturday 23rd August 2014

Jaime Pressly
Jaime Pressly

A Haunted House 2 Trailer


Malcolm miraculously survives after his home and girlfriend Kisha were terrorised incessantly by a violent spirit who possessed Kisha and forced him to go to extreme lengths to exorcise her. Now, he's starting over after meeting a blonde young mother but he can't help but feel a little nervous about finding a new home. When they eventually do find a place they could live, they are no sooner on the threshold than the same weird things start happening all over again. Desperate and hysterical once more, he seeks help again from Father Doug who is firmly against coming into contact with anything paranormal ever again. Meanwhile, a still possessed Kisha returns to find Malcolm - and the last thing she wants to do is kiss and make up.

Continue: A Haunted House 2 Trailer

Doa: Dead Or Alive Review


Grim
Dead or Alive could be the most literal cinematic interpretation of a computer game ever made. In the film, three young women fight in a combat tournament called DOA: Dead or Alive, held on a top secret, technologically advanced Pacific island resort. As they kick, punch and scratch their way through a smorgasbord of fighters (and suitors), they are recorded by the island's invasive video cameras and watched on multiple screens in a computer laboratory by tournament director Donovan (Eric Roberts). Here's where it gets literal. Donovan injects all competitors with nanobots that record data from their blood stream. This data is relayed back into the computer system so that when Donovan (and the audience) views the fights, incongruous colored bars hover in the upper right and left corners of the screen, indicating the power levels of each competitor. Each time a player is hit, the bar reduces. As the bar is diminished, the fighter becomes more sluggish, until it disappears completely and the fighter collapses. When this happens, giant red and yellow words jump onto the screen and announce who won, who lost, and how.

Clearly, the filmmakers have respected the basic format of the DOA computer game and respected its fans. However, in respecting the computer game director Cory Yuen has disrespected cinema and forgotten the basic needs of a decent film: a good story, interesting characters and some sort of drama. DOA occasionally touches on all of these points, but kicks away in favor of a slavish desire to package the entire production in the style of its source material.

Continue reading: Doa: Dead Or Alive Review

Joe Dirt Review


Terrible
As scary as it sounds, I was actually looking forward to seeing the new David Spade comedy, Joe Dirt. My entire childhood and much of my adolescence was spent in such podunk California towns such as Exeter, Georgetown, Placerville, Bakersfield, Visalia, Fresno, Garden Valley, Kelsey, and Cool. Such places where ripped Dokken t-shirts were worn with pride, jeans were bathed in an acid wash, and hair cuts were sported by the mullet kings of Cali. I grew up in fear of Wrangler jeans, Bob Seger t-shirts, and Chevy Camaros.

Joe Dirt was meant to be redemption for my miserable years at the hands of these greasy, ignorant tormentors. But then 30 minutes went by and the movie took a sharp left into saps-ville, crashing and burning like a 74 'Cuda wrapped around an oak tree. Oh well.

Continue reading: Joe Dirt Review

Bachelor Party Vegas Review


Weak
With a title like Bachelor Party Vegas, you're at least getting truth in advertising. This is a raunchy, near-plotless, direct-to-DVD experience, heavy on debauchery, nudity, off-color language, and the like. Primarily it seems concerned with Farrelly brothers-style gross-out nekkidness: Old people, ugly people, talking about their anatomy or rubbing themselves against our hapless bachelor partygoers, who fly to Vegas for the big event.

The event starts off with bikini-babe paintball game, moves on to a well-product-placed Golden Nugget casino, and then detours to a porn set, a giant tub of spaghetti, a warehouse, jail, and more. American Pie-style antics are rampant, though Harold and Kumar's Kal Penn is the only one of the boys you're likely to have ever seen before.

Continue reading: Bachelor Party Vegas Review

Not Another Teen Movie Review


Unbearable
Fitting spoofs of at least 16 teen movies into one questionable parody film is like trying to fit ten pounds of sausage into a five pound bag. You just end up with a groan-inducing mess.

Stuffed solid with references to nearly ever teen-related movie made in the last 20 years (including a few I never knew were teen films -- American Beauty and Almost Famous?), Not Another Teen Movie is a headache-inducing, lame-ass ride down memory lane. It's a mystery just who the filmmakers think this movie's target audience is, considering that those of us who grew up in the '80s are most likely not going to get all the '90s teen movie references, and vice versa.

Continue reading: Not Another Teen Movie Review

100 Girls Review


OK
One hell of an oddity, 100 Girls is the bizarre tale of a lovestruck young geek (Jonathan Tucker) who, after a mysterious one-night stand in a darkened elevator, finds himself pining for the girl he connected with on that night. The only problem -- he never saw her face or got her name, but of course she's The One.

Tucker's Matthew embarks on a quest to scour the college dorm in which they met in order to track the mystery woman down. His M.O.: Posing as a maintenance man so he can sneak into the girls' rooms and try to match up a pair of panties she left behind in the elevator. And somehow this is meant to be charming.

Continue reading: 100 Girls Review

Tomcats Review


Grim
The one statement used in defining a film that drives fear and loathing into my heart is invariably "an outlandish comedy." They try in vain to recycle the originality of American Pie, Porky's, Road Trip, or South Park, attempting to meld a T&A gross-out contest with a love story, and they always fail miserably.

Tomcats wins, hands-down, the lowest common denominator award so far this year. It's a trashy, sexist, crude comedy revolving around the values of commitment, honesty, and screwing your friends over for half a million dollars. In the process, it throws us numerous sex partners, Bill Maher playing a thug named Carlos, true love, and an escaping testicle.

Continue reading: Tomcats Review

Poor White Trash Review


Excellent
What is it about semi-rural America that makes it so ripe for satirizing American values? It's a longstanding tradition of mockery, from the Coen brothers' Raising Arizona to Lynch's psychotic Blue Velvet and Twin Peaks, to, finally, Michael Addis' Poor White Trash.

Poor White Trash concerns Michael Bronco (Tony Denman), a small-town boy who wants nothing more than to be a psychologist. He spends his evenings talking about how his divorced mother's (Sean Young) anger towards her ex is a shield for her fear of abandonment, and spends his days raisin' hell with Ron Lake (William Devane). One day, the hell raisin' goes a little too far and the two find themselves in court, where they are convicted but get a suspended sentence due to the handiwork of the sleazy Lennie Lake (Jacob Tierney), a gold-toothed hick of a lawyer with a beer-can garden (you really have to witness this bizarre sight to believe it). Thinking that all is fine, the group goes off to celebrate, only to find out that Michael can't get into college now that he's been convicted of a crime.

Continue reading: Poor White Trash Review

Joe Dirt Review


Zero

"Joe Dirt" was obviously written by people who owe their careers to sketch comedy. This David Spade vehicle about an inbred, mullet-haired, 98-pound nitwit has no structure to speak of other than the main character narrating four-minute vignettes about meeting road movie oddballs and fantasy sexpots while crisscrossing the country on a quest to find the white-trash parents that abandoned him as a child.

Tying these episodes together is a pathetically contrived set piece in which this grating dullard tells his life story to a drive-time DJ (Dennis Miller, propped up and caffeinated) -- over the course of three days of broadcasts. Talk about your lame plot devices. How did Joe get on the air? He's a janitor at the radio station and the show's producer thought he'd be the perfect sitting duck for Miller's on-air degradation.

After exhausting every shopworn hayseed cliché in the first 10 minutes (shirtless hick driving a primer-painted junk yard muscle car, listening to Lynyrd Skynyrd), without garnering as much as a slight smile, director Dennie Gordon (apparently one of Adam Sandler's many talentless bootlicks) pretty much just points the camera at Spade and lets him ad lib, with arduously flavorless results.

Continue reading: Joe Dirt Review

Tomcats Review


Zero

Until the blooper reel that runs with the closing credits, there's scarcely a sign of wit or talent in the entirety of "Tomcats," another in what seems to be a never-ending sewer-spawn tidal wave of excessively tasteless comedies green-lighted on the coattails of "There's Something About Mary" and "American Pie."

In this one, a group of commitment-phobic buddies invest a pool of bet money that will go to the last bachelor standing. Before the first reel is over, writer-director Gregory Poirier (he wrote the campus killer thriller "Gossip") has made the movie's first big mistake and proven his laziness by skipping over the matrimonial surrender of all but two of the guys.

The plot concerns Michael (Jerry O'Connell) trying to marry off Kyle (Jake Busey) so he can collect the pot to pay off $51,000 he owes to a Vegas casino run by leg-breaking mobsters.

Continue reading: Tomcats Review

Jaime Pressly

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