Jacqueline Kim

Jacqueline Kim

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Jacqueline Kim - 2016 Film Independent Spirit Awards held at Santa Monica Beach - Arrivals at Independent Spirit Awards - Los Angeles, California, United States - Saturday 27th February 2016

Jacqueline Kim
Jacqueline Kim

Jacqueline Kim - Advantageous Canadian Premiere at the Niagara Integrated Film Festival. - Niagara On The Lake, Canada - Friday 19th June 2015

Jacqueline Kim
Jacqueline Kim
Jacqueline Kim
Jacqueline Kim and Tony Watts
Jacqueline Kim and Tony Watts
Jacqueline Kim and Tony Watts

Red Doors Review


Good
At last we left the quirky-family dramedy, it was thrusting us into a dilapidated VW van with Toni Collette and Greg Kinnear at the helm in the lovable, if not uneven Little Miss Sunshine. Now, in a stab at cultural accentuation, we are given Red Doors, the tale of the Wongs, an extremely dysfunctional Asian family living in the suburbs surrounding New York City. Too bad culture and tradition are used only as window dressing.

When Ed Wong (the reliable Tzi Ma) retires, he finds that the meaning in his life has been lost. His first way to regain it is to surround himself with old tapes of his three daughters and wife when they were growing up. It doesn't help to look at them now. His wife (Freda Foh Shen) has become a mechanical beast of nagging and criticism. Samantha (Jacqueline Kim), his eldest, has become all business, no soul, and gives all her time to her husband, who is likewise all business. His middle daughter, Julie (Elaine Kao), is a repressed lesbian who begins falling for a B-movie actress (Mia Riverton). And then there's Katie (Kathy Shao-Lin Lee), his youngest, a hip-hop dancer who shows her affection for her neighbor (Sebastian Stan) by pulling dangerous pranks. Ed attempts to commit suicide, but not one of the 40-plus attempts have been successful. Ed's finally conclusion: become a Buddhist and move to an upstate temple to study the religion. This, of course, sends the family into disarray.

Continue reading: Red Doors Review

The Hollywood Sign Review


Good
Tom Berenger, Burt Reynolds, and Rod Steiger play washed-up actors who find the opportunity to get back in the biz... if they can rip off some Vegas goons by convincing them they're cops.

No, it isn't high art. It isn't even Lethal Weapon, but the triple-threat of ham-fisted actors makes The Hollywood Sign something of a guilty pleasure.

Continue reading: The Hollywood Sign Review

Brokedown Palace Review


Excellent
So the words "justice system" are an oxymoron in Thailand. Last year, Return to Paradise vividly portrayed just how corrupt and ruthless the law can be for ignorant tourists who presume that an American passport is a "get out of jail free" card in Southeast Asia. Brokedown Palace, directed by Jonathan Kaplan (The Accused, Love Field) elaborates on this theme, only this time it's two juvenile girls from Upland, Ohio facing trouble inparadise.

To celebrate high school graduation, Alice Mareno (Claire Daines) and Darlene Davis (Kate Beckinsale) plan an eleven day sojourn to Bangkok. ("Las Vegas without parents and laws," Alice proclaims to the more cautious Arlene) After a few days of fun in the sun, the two get a little more than they bargained for after they meet the seductive and alluring Nick Parks (Daniel Lapaine) who invites them on a weekend excursion to Hong Kong. In their rush to get to the airport, they fail to realize that Nick has planted over a kilo of heroin in Darlene's backpack. They both are arrested in the airport and once in prison, Darlene is tricked into signing a confession. They are each convicted of drug trafficking and given 33 years apiece in a hideous prison ruefully described by it's inmates as "The Brokedown Palace." Desperate for help and down to their last hope, the girls turn to "Yankee Hank" (Bill Pullman) a maverick American lawyer who takes up the daunting challenge of defending them. Together the three attempt to salvage their lives and their freedom against the tyrannical Thai government and outlandish justice system.

Continue reading: Brokedown Palace Review

Star Trek: Generations Review


Good
The seventh Star Trek movie went where no man had gone before, at least not in Hollywood: Attempting to take an old and lethargic movie franchise and reinvigorate it with a new cast -- uniting both the original and new casts in one massive crossover movie.

Generations (having dispensed with the numbering of the sequels) is a fair enough film. It's massively contrived to be sure -- the Kirk-era cast and Picard-era cast were meant to be some 80 years apart -- but considering the difficulty of trying to combine two crews in one movie, Shatner & Stewart turned in a fair enough endeavor.

Continue reading: Star Trek: Generations Review

The Operator Review


Very Good
Exhibit A in why you shouldn't be rude to telemarketers, no matter your mood.

Indie flick The Operator is a hybrid black comedy/Hitchcock thriller about a real cad named Gary (Michael Laurence) -- a lawyer, quite naturally -- who "reaps what he sows" after telling off a vengeful telephone operator. Gary cheats on his wife (and his mistress), gambles, spends the savings on a fancy car, and represents dirtbags at the office. When the stress of his life gets too much to bear, he lets a poor Ma Ball employee we known only as Shiva (Jacqueline Kim) take the brunt of his wrath, which she turns back upon him in spades.

Continue reading: The Operator Review

Charlotte Sometimes Review


Very Good
There has never been a leading man as quiet as Michael (Michael Idemoto), the taciturn mechanic whose pregnant pauses and sidelong glances propel Charlotte Sometimes. By day he repairs German cars at his LA garage. After work, he returns to his house on a hill, turns on a lamp or two, and reads quietly.

The silence is broken only by Michael's tenant, Lori (Eugenia Yuan), who lives downstairs in the first floor of Michael's house. Lori has the disturbing habit of making loud, passionate love to her boyfriend, Justin (Matt Westmore), and then coming upstairs to snuggle with Michael and talk about this and that.

Continue reading: Charlotte Sometimes Review

Brokedown Palace Review


Weak

It would be a lot easier to take "Brokedown Palace" seriously as an Americans-imprisoned-abroad drama if the soundtrack wasn't peppered with chart-bound, pensive chick-pop. With empowering anthems from the likes of P.J. Harvey regularly laid down to illustrate its perceived depth of emotion, this movie makes being framed for drug smuggling and locked up in a dingy Thai prison play like little more than a vaguely deep, teen movie metaphor.

The teens in the case are Alice (Claire Danes) and Darlene (Kate Beckinsale), fresh out of high school and spiriting away to the Far East for one crazy summer before starting college.

Two apple-cheeked 18-year-olds, innocent in the ways of the Third World, their spontaneous Asian adventure (they told their parents they were going to Hawaii) begins with carefree cultural touristing at farmers markets and $6-a-night hotels. But it becomes a grim nightmare when a handsome young Australian (Daniel Lapaine) charms them both senseless, then hides heroin in their luggage after inviting them to visit him for a weekend in Hong Kong.

Continue reading: Brokedown Palace Review

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Jacqueline Kim Movies

Red Doors Movie Review

Red Doors Movie Review

At last we left the quirky-family dramedy, it was thrusting us into a dilapidated VW...

Brokedown Palace Movie Review

Brokedown Palace Movie Review

So the words "justice system" are an oxymoron in Thailand. Last year, Return to...

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Charlotte Sometimes Movie Review

Charlotte Sometimes Movie Review

There has never been a leading man as quiet as Michael (Michael Idemoto), the taciturn...

Brokedown Palace Movie Review

Brokedown Palace Movie Review

It would be a lot easier to take "Brokedown Palace" seriously as an Americans-imprisoned-abroad drama...

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