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Neil Patrick Harris And 9 Other Actors Who Donned Drag For Roles


Neil Patrick Harris Jared Leto John Travolta Michael J Fox Johnny Depp Eddie Murphy Marlon Wayans Rupert Everett Tony Curtis Jack Lemmon

So, Neil Patrick Harris basically won the Tonys 2014 (the whole thing) with his performance of "Sugar Daddy" from Hedwig and the Angry Inch. Harris has been making headlines as the lead in the Broadway show since he joined the cast earlier this year. He’s not the first actor to don drag for a role, these other actors have all dressed up like the fairer sex for performances in the past.

Actors Who Dressed In Drag Neil Patrick Harris has received rave reviews for his performance in Hedwig and the Angry Inch

The original drag pair, Tony Curtis and Jack Lemmon

Continue reading: Neil Patrick Harris And 9 Other Actors Who Donned Drag For Roles

Grumpy Old Men Review


OK
Grumpy Old Men, directed with general disinterest by Donald Petrie, is 100 minutes of Walter Matthau and Jack Lemmon pulling pranks, calling each other names, complaining and falling in love with Ann-Margret. I am suitably entertained by these things. Whether or not you are will be the deciding factor of what you think of what is ostensibly a geriatric Odd Couple.

Milking a 50-odd year rivalry, John Gustafson (Lemmon) and Max Goldman (Matthau), for reasons where logic dare not tread, live right next to each other in suburban Minnesota. Their lives hinge on very few things: Their kids, fishing, grandkids, fishing, evading tax collectors, fishing, and going to the bait shop to talk with Charlie (Ossie Davis) about fishing. That is when they aren't being a royal pain in each other's asses.

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The Odd Couple Review


Excellent
There was a time, a little less than four decades ago, when Neil Simon was the literary benchmark of both Broadway and the Silver Screen. After a successful stint as a TV scribe on Sid Caesar's Your Show of Shows, the soon to be phenomenon went on to create such Great White Way staples as Barefoot in the Park, Sweet Charity, Plaza Suite, and The Prisoner of Second Avenue. In 1966, he had four shows running at once and it wasn't long before Hollywood came calling.

After adapting his Come Blow Your Horn and Park for the big screen, Simon was given the complicated task of translating his mega-hit The Odd Couple as a movie. While the studios would accept Oscar- and Tony-winner Walter Matthau as Oscar, Art Carney's cinematic clout as Felix was questioned. Luckily, director Gene Saks hired friend and Fortune Cookie co-star Jack Lemmon as the notorious neat freak. The rest, as they say, is motion picture history.

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Missing Review


Excellent
Before there was the Iraq War, there was the Chilean coup. And before there was Daniel Pearl, there was Charlie Horman, who vanished one day in 1973 while it was all going down in a time of serious turmoil.

Like Pearl, Horman was a reporter -- or, at least, he wanted to be one -- which brought him to Chile during the violent upheaval in this troubled South American country. Martial law is in full effect: If you can't tell by the military officials and machine guns on every corner, then perhaps the piles of dead bodies -- some covered, some not -- might clue you in.

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Tuesdays With Morrie Review


OK
I didn't read Mitch Albom's book, Tuesdays With Morrie, which spent about two jillion years on the bestseller lists. But based on the movie, I can see why so many people bought the book and why it's ripe for criticism.

As Brandeis University professor Morrie Schwartz's body deteriorated from Lou Gehrig's Disease, former student Albom decided to record the man's thoughts on an array of topics. If the movie is anything like the book, then Morrie sounds like the world's foremost pop psychologist.

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Short Cuts Review


Good
While one could argue that Robert Altman's 1993 film Short Cuts was simply an updating of his 1975 classic Nashville, with a much higher quotient of star power and slightly more prurient subject matter - an attempt to keep the once iconic filmmaker from straying into the shadowy irrelevance like so many of his '70s peers - and while that argument could very well be true, that doesn't deprive Short Cuts of any of its power, or disprove the fact that it's ultimately a better film.

Spinning together a series of short stories from the master of the form, Raymond Carver, Altman takes some 20-odd Los Angelenos and twists their lives together seemingly just for the fun of how their individual little lives play out and connect up, like a puppetmaster who can't stop adding new puppets to his repertoire. To flesh out his tapestry of early '90s Southern California life, Altman has a fine batch of actors and actresses, including everyone from the best of their generation (Jennifer Jason Leigh, Robert Downey Jr) to the solidly respectable but not terribly exciting choices (Julianne Moore, Matthew Modine, Madeleine Stowe) to oddly effective musician stunt casting (Lyle Lovett, Tom Waits, Huey Lewis) to one lordly presence (Jack Lemmon).

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The Legend Of Bagger Vance Review


Excellent
Robert Redford's singular devotion to American mythology continues in The Legend of Bagger Vance, the story of a golfer who's lost his swing and the caddy who brings it back to him. "Inside each and every one of us," says Vance (Smith), "is our one true, authentic swing." It's a metaphor intended to apply to all walks of life, on the fairway or otherwise. If oversweet metaphors like this are your bag, then you're really going to like Bagger Vance.

The story opens in the present with an aged Hardy Greaves (Jack Lemmon) suffering a heart attack on a golf course. As he lies quietly smiling to himself, he muses on the frequency of his cardiovascular failures and his love of the game of golf, which meanders into a quixotic narration on the career of Rannulph Junuh (Damon). Soon the narrative fades to the past and we see Junuh at the height of his career, in the company of the enchanting Adele Invergordon (played by Charlize Theron of The Devil's Advocate fame; who, by the way, happens to represent the purest embodiment of good, wholesome sex that the film industry has to offer).

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Save The Tiger Review


Excellent
Jack Lemmon won the Best Actor Oscar for his harrowing portrayal of Harry Stoner, who at first seems your average self-loathing businessman, but soon enough proves to have a batallion of skeletons in his closet. Harry's clothing business, it seems, isn't doing so well -- and in fact, he's so deep in debt he's ready to burn down the factory for the insurance money. Meanwhile, as the film plays out over a little over a day in Harry's life, he nearly breaks down on stage as WWII flashbacks nearly put a quick end to his latest line of fashions, a hooker just about kills one of his business associates, and Harry's world nearly falls apart. Lemmon is undoubtedly the centerpiece here, keeping up with an overdone story and ultimately redeeming the film admirably.

Some Like It Hot Review


Excellent
"Nobody's perfect," as Joe E. Brown's Osgood memorably utters, thus finishing off one of Hollywood's greatest screwball comedies. And indeed, Some Like It Hot is far from a perfect film. But Billy Wilder took what might have been a rather banal story line and juiced it up into classic territory by squeezing Monroe, Curtis, and Lemmon into dresses and giving them some of the wittiest one-liners on film.

To be sure, Tony Curtis thinks he looks like Cary Grant in his sailor uniform but he really looks more like Charles Nelson Reilly, and Marilyn is visibly, obviously trashed out of her gourd for the entire picture, but hey, it was fun in the sun at the Hotel Del Coronado in the Prohibition era, and even the mob on their collective tails can't put a dent in the fun.

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Mister Roberts Review


Good
A universally overrated diversion, Mister Roberts is a pleasant diversion but not a lot more. The story of the most boring ship in the WWII-era Navy (a lowly cargo ship), we find its denizens desperate for action, resorting to pulling practical jokes for kicks. Among them are Jack Lemmon (who won an Oscar for a trivial role) and Henry Fonda, who proves unilaterally that he was not made for comedy, but James Cagney's crazed captain steals the show. The last half-hour of the film is depressing.

That's Life Review


OK
Blake Edwards' semi-experimental movie is no Best in Show, but it's worth a gander anyway. Jack Lemmon is on fire as a hypochondriac turning 60 years old, his rapid-fire screed against everything is rich and real, a function of his own improvisation. There are some amazing moments in the film -- the panning shot of Lemmon in his underwear against a stark horizon is one of cinema's greats (and it's on the DVD cover) -- but too much of That's Life comes across as a victim of its improv nuttiness.

The Fortune Cookie Review


Excellent
This very funny Billy Wilder comedy actually stands as the first on-screen pairing of Jack Lemmon and Walter Matthau. It was the beginning of a beautiful friendship, and Matthau took home a Best Supporting Actor Oscar for his role as Whiplash Willie, a shyster attorney who convinces his cameraman brother-in-law (Lemmon) to sue the NFL when he's injured a football game, exaggerating his injuries. A bit long (over two hours), but Wilder's use of title cards to present numbered "chapters" keeps things moving along pretty well. The banter between Lemmon and Matthau is, as always, priceless.

The Front Page Review


Good
Billy Wilder's version of the classic play carries a lot of fond memories for former newspapermen like myself, but I don't expect The Front Page to resonate quite so well with the rest of the populace. Lemmon plays it straight as a reporter bent on getting out of the business in order to get married while Matthau's hilariously over-the-top editor does everything in his power to keep him on the payroll during a fantastic jailbreak in 1920s Chicago. It drags in the middle, but a good first act and a stellar finale make the movie completely worthwhile.

Glengarry Glen Ross Review


Essential
Pacino should have won an Oscar for his performance as a land salesman/con-man in this ensemble piece about what happens on the other side of the phone line during those late night sales pitches you get. In this case it's real estate (worthless, of course, though that's never stated) the sharks are selling. And they aren't really that good at it, either. Pacino's the rainmaker of the group, but supporting characters played by Jack Lemmon, Alan Arkin, and Ed Harris are struggling. When some breaks in to the manager's (Kevin Spacey) office and steals the good "Glengarry" leads, all hell breaks loose.

Who knew director James Foley had this movie in him. With credits from Who's That Girl? to Fear to The Corruptor, Foley hasn't made a passable movie before or since this 1992 production. Having a script by David Mamet (based on his stage play) doesn't hurt, nor does having at least two screen legends in the cast. Hell, even the minor characters are stellar. Jonathan Pryce's beaten-down mark is one of the most memorably pathetic losers on celluloid. Alec Baldwin's five minutes of screen time here is his greatest work ever.

Continue reading: Glengarry Glen Ross Review

The Legend Of Bagger Vance Review


Weak

Isn't it ironic that Robert Redford, the Sundance sugar daddy of independent film, seems to have become incapable of directing a movie that isn't utterly conventional, soft-focused Hollywood melodrama?

Granted, he's good at it. There's a certain beauty and poetry to films like "A River Runs Through It," "The Horse Whisperer" and his new golf-as-philosophy fable "The Legend of Bagger Vance," but it's a Hallmark card kind of beauty and poetry, printed on flimsy paperboard and worth $2.50 at most.

The title character of "Bagger Vance" -- a folksy, Southern, porch swing spirit guide played by Will Smith -- even speaks a lot like a Hallmark card.

Continue reading: The Legend Of Bagger Vance Review

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