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Gabriel Macht and Jacinda Barrett - Shots of a host of stars as they took to the red carpet for the Premiere of the new Netflix original series 'Bloodline' The premiere was held at the SVA Theatre in New York City, New York, United States - Tuesday 3rd March 2015

Gabriel Macht and Jacinda Barrett

'Zero Hour' Is Either Laughing Bad Or Ridiculously Good, You Decide


Anthony Edwards Paul Scheuring Scott Michael Foster Jacinda Barrett

Zero Hour, the American conspiracy television series created by Paul Scheuring, premieres on ABC tonight (February 14, 2013), though early critics reviews have left us with absolute NO IDEA as to whether it's going to be any good. Some viewers may have made their minds up - the pilot episode has been available on Hulu since February 1.

The show certainly seems to boast a decent pedigree - Scheuring was the mastermind behind the thrilling drama Prison Break. The show won the 2006 People's Choice Award for Favorite New TV Drama and was nominated for the 2005 Golden Globe Award for Best Television Series Drama. Zero Hour follows the story of Hank (E.R.'s Anthony Edwards), who runs the magazine Modern Skeptic with his friends Rachel (Addison Timlir) and Arron (Scott Michael Foster). The group finds themselves involved in a dangerous worldwide conspiracy after Hank's wife (Jacinda Barrett) is kidnapped.

As mentioned, the show has polarized critics - basically, nobody knows whether it's the best or worst television drama since, err, Prison Break. Dorothy Rabinowitz of the Wall Street Journal was generally impressed by Zero Hour, "It's a measure of the skill brought to this script by Paul Scheuring that a first episode so awash in multiplying complications manages to maintain its coherence and even a significant measure of suspense," she wrote. David Hinckley of the New York Daily News offered cautious, though Tom Goodman of the Hollywood Reporter wrote, "Zero Hour has lots of twists and turns that could be worth following. It also has the DNA to be laughably bad." It's safe to assume Aaron Riccio of Slant Magazine will not be tuning in for the rest of the series, writing, "The first 12 minutes are enough to bury it, though given the shoddy acting, overwrought dialogue, and poor production values, it's easy to imagine that 12 full episodes would in fact bring about the end of time itself."

Continue reading: 'Zero Hour' Is Either Laughing Bad Or Ridiculously Good, You Decide

New York, I Love You Review


Very Good
There are 11 captivating short films in this anthology, the second in the Cities of Love series by producers Benbihy and Grasic. But this collection isn't quite as varied or engaging as Paris Je T'Aime.

All of these stories take place in Manhattan, with only one or two brief forays into other boroughs, and they all centre around relatively well-off people, mainly white or Asian. They're also quite serious and emotional, with only brief moments of humour dotted here and there, although some make us smile more than others. Each is about a male-female relationship--marriages, brief encounters, possibilities, life-long companionship. Most have a somewhat gimmicky twist, and a few are intriguingly oblique.

Continue reading: New York, I Love You Review

Gabriel Macht, AFI and Jacinda Barrett - Gabriel Macht and Jacinda Barrett Hollywood, California - World Premiere of Love & Other Drugs at AFI Fest 2010 Opening Night Gala held at the Grauman's Chinese Theatre Thursday 4th November 2010

Gabriel Macht, Afi and Jacinda Barrett
Gabriel Macht and Afi
Gabriel Macht, Afi and Jacinda Barrett
Gabriel Macht and Afi

Jacinda Barrett and Gabriel Macht - Jacinda Barrett and Gabriel Macht Westwood, California - The LA premiere of Whiteout at the Mann's Village Theater in Wednesday 9th September 2009

Jacinda Barrett Wednesday 9th September 2009 The LA premiere of Whiteout at the Mann's Village Theater in Westwood, California

Jacinda Barrett
Jacinda Barrett
Jacinda Barrett
Jacinda Barrett

Jacinda Barrett and Gabriel Macht - Jacinda Barrett and Gabriel Macht Thursday 18th December 2008 Los Angeles movie premiere of 'The Spirit' shown at Grauman's Chinese Theater

Jacinda Barrett and Gabriel Macht
Jacinda Barrett and Gabriel Macht

The Namesake Review


Very Good
Mira Nair's latest film, a translation of Jhumpa Lahiri's emphatically praised book The Namesake, caps off a theme that has been heavy in her work thus far: assimilation and cultural duty. Though she's been making films since the mid-'80s, Nair didn't attain commercial attention until 2002 with Monsoon Wedding, an exuberant comedy about a New Delhi wedding between a woman who just ended an affair with a married producer and a native of India prospering in Texas. The modest hit gave her enough clout to secure her a director's chair on the last adaptation of William Makepeace Thackeray's Vanity Fair, an England-based novel given an Indian flair on the big screen.

Monsoon Wedding turned the slow grinding of cross-culture gears into a comfy piece of visual pop. It confronted the situation but seemed complacent enough to leave the confrontation in simple, digestible terms; a stylized My Big Fat Greek Wedding. In contrast, Vanity Fair, originally a satire of England's manners and traditions, was taken deep into the mystic, hitting its most absurd note when Reese Witherspoon seductively belly danced with a tribe of women from India. Though it was easy to see where these moments were pointing, The Namesake gives Nair a broad canvas and a more concise frame to study the American identity and its effects on other cultures without any affectation or pretense.

Continue reading: The Namesake Review

The Last Kiss (2006) Review


OK

The catchy pop ballads found on the soundtrack for Tony Goldwyn's The Last Kiss will break your heart in two. The movie these songs support only wishes it could make such a claim.

Back to the music for a minute. Coldplay, Cary Brothers, Fiona Apple, Snow Patrol, and a smattering of other fashionable artists - each handpicked by leading man Zach Braff - croon (and sometimes whine) about infidelity, loss, and life-changing mistakes that target the love of your life. Sample lyrics include, "She's moving on... without you." Sentiments rarely deviate from this norm. It's a nice place to wallow on a rainy afternoon.

Braff worked similar musical magic for his directorial debut Garden State. His ear for stirring, soulful melodies earned him a Best Compilation Soundtrack for a Motion Picture Grammy award. But where Braff's Garden mix tape enhanced his quirky and personal little comedy, this new song collection can't lift Goldwyn's somber material from the doldrums.

Continue reading: The Last Kiss (2006) Review

School For Scoundrels Review


Good
In School for Scoundrels, director Todd Phillips (Road Trip) proves that his truest virtue is also his greatest vice. Most comedies made in Hollywood today are stuffed to the gills with joke after joke after joke, with seemingly little regard for whether the humor actually works. In the bizarre logic of studio filmmaking, a lame joke is better than no joke at all. Phillips takes the opposite tack in his films. He's more concerned with the quality of laughs than with the quantity of them. His best effort, Old School, is a riotously funny movie with a surprisingly conservative sprinkling of jokes. It's a model of comic efficiency. Every bit works and every gag hit its target. However, there's a dark side to this approach. The slightest miscalculation in the quality of a joke can lead to long stretches without so much as a chuckle or even a smirk. And it's this problem that unfortunately afflicts School for Scoundrels.

Scoundrels gets off to a sluggish start as it introduces its main character, Roger (Jon Heder), a geeky New York City meter maid (meter butler?) whose life is falling apart. He gets robbed at work. His boss is unsympathetic to his problems and his coworkers ridicule him. He regularly humiliates himself in front of his gorgeous neighbor, Amanda (Jacinda Barrett). And even his volunteer work is a disaster, as his Little Brother asks to be assigned to someone else. Heder channels the inner nerd that carried Napoleon Dynamite to its stratospheric success, but the script doesn't provide enough originality or comic punch to bring his character to life. The opening 15 minutes are flat, dimensionless, and largely laugh-free.

Continue reading: School For Scoundrels Review

Poseidon Review


OK

34 years ago, The Poseidon Adventure rode the trendy disaster meme of its day to stellar box office and numerous Oscar nominations. Today, Poseidon sits poised to ride the current effects meme to similar financial reward and perhaps some technical nods to boot. What it probably won't see is acclaim for its dialogue, story, or characters, but those laurels largely eluded its predecessor as well.

As with its forerunner, Poseidon opens with an introduction to its namesake, a massive luxury liner, and its passengers, which in this installment include an ex-mayor/firefighter (Kurt Russell), his daughter (Emmy Rossum), her beloved (Mike Vogel), a gambler (Josh Lucas), a jilted lover (Richard Dreyfuss), a stowaway (Mía Maestro), an inevitably hot single mom (Jacinda Barrett), her inevitably adorable tyke (Jimmy Bennett), and a waiter (a completely wasted Freddy Rodríguez). If you think reading a list of these stereotypes is tiresome, watching them establish their personas is more so.

Continue reading: Poseidon Review

The Human Stain Review


Weak
Miramax makes its initial bid for Oscar gold with The Human Stain, Robert Benton's torpid adaptation of Philip Roth's acclaimed novel about race and sex and lots of other "big" issues such as the price one pays - emotionally, psychologically, professionally - for attempting to flee both the past and one's true self. Yet this lifelessly structured film feels like a puzzle with too many identical parts, each character merely another example of the film's painfully obvious moral lessons. Throw in some ridiculous miscasting and a facile Clinton-Lewinsky scandal backdrop, and what you've got is a film drunk on its own highfalutin melodrama.

Anthony Hopkins is Coleman Silk, a Classics professor at a Massachusetts university, who, because of an alleged racial epithet (he refers to delinquent African-American students as "spooks"), is not only forced into early retirement, but also into unexpected bachelorhood after his wife suddenly drops dead from the news. Coleman is an erudite Jewish man who harbors a great secret about his past, and soon his tortured life has become intertwined with kindred souls. He befriends the reclusive Nathan Zuckerman (Gary Sinise), a novelist who has retired to a remote cabin after a cancer scare has left him petrified of his own mortality. Soon afterwards, he meets a striking post office janitor named Faunia Farley (Nicole Kidman), who, because of a former marriage and a terrible accident, fervently shuns the outside world. Coleman and Faunia strike up a May-December romance, much to the chagrin of both Faunia's loco ex-husband Lester (Ed Harris) and a community whose fascination with Clinton's sexual indiscretions hints at an illogical obsession with political correctness.

Continue reading: The Human Stain Review

Bridget Jones: The Edge Of Reason Review


OK
In the last three years, Renée Zellweger has lost all 25 pounds of her Bridget Jones weight, vamped her way through Chicago, chunked up again for Cold Mountain, waifed away for Down with Love, and -- finally -- put all that weight back on for her long-awaited return to the role of an insecure Brit -- one which she swore she'd never perform again.

Well, throw enough money at something and it's bound to change people's minds. In fact, that seems to be the operating assumption for the entirety of this sequel, Bridget Jones: The Edge of Reason, a lackluster follow-up to the mildly enchanting original.

Continue reading: Bridget Jones: The Edge Of Reason Review

Ladder 49 Review


Excellent
Firefighter movies resemble westerns in the singular fact that I can see one decent one every five years or so and be completely satisfied. Ladder 49 happens to be an excellent flame jockey adventure, a stirring audience-pleaser that accurately captures the fear, fearlessness, and physicality associated with entering a burning room and, possibly, not exiting. Relatives of firefighters will embrace it lovingly, while the rest of us will appreciate its unquestionable sincerity.

At the same time, Ladder and its creators make no bones about the fact that the film is pushing our emotional buttons. It manipulates our heart strings and tugs at our tear ducts in its quest for inspirational cinema. Admittedly, it's a bit slick and overdone, but it's difficult to fault a picture that wears its intentions on its soot-stained sleeve and holds the serviceman position of firefighter on such a lofty pedestal.

Continue reading: Ladder 49 Review

The Human Stain Review


Good

Director Robert Benton's quietly compelling adaptation of Philip Roth's novel "The Human Stain" has two conspicuous problems: The very beginning and the very end, both of which are such arrant cinematic affectations that I knew immediately -- without ever having read the book -- the scenes were supplements of the screenplay.

The film opens with a flash-forward revealing its two main characters in a car crash on an icy road. This disclosure has the opposite of its intended effect -- it squelches half the story's escalating tension because you already know what's coming, even if you don't immediately know the ultimate fate of the people in the car.

The faux pas at the end of the picture is that Benton overshoots a perfect finale (the last scene from the novel, I've since learned) for the sake of a heartstring-tugging Hollywood epilogue.

Continue reading: The Human Stain Review

Jacinda Barrett

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Katy Perry Performs 'Rise' And 'Roar' In Support Of Hillary Clinton At DNC

Katy Perry Performs 'Rise' And 'Roar' In Support Of Hillary Clinton At DNC

Perry performed 'Rise' and 'Roar' before Clinton accepted the nomination to be the Democrats' presidential candidate.

Bruce Springsteen will release music from 1966 in new album

Bruce Springsteen will release music from 1966 in new album

Bruce Springsteen will release rare tracks from 1966 in new album 'Chapter and Verse', which will accompany his autobiography 'Born To Run'.

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4K Restoration Of The Beatles' Shea Stadium Gig To Be Released In Cinemas

4K Restoration Of The Beatles' Shea Stadium Gig To Be Released In Cinemas

Not broadcast in its entirety since 1967, a full restoration will be played in select cinemas to support Ron Howard's 'Eight Days a Week' touring...

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Jacinda Barrett Movies

New York, I Love You Movie Review

New York, I Love You Movie Review

There are 11 captivating short films in this anthology, the second in the Cities of...

The Namesake, Trailer Stream Trailer

The Namesake, Trailer Stream Trailer

The NamesakeTrailer StreamSynopsis Mira Nair (Monsoon Wedding, Salaam Bombay, Vanity Fair) returns with her new...

The Namesake Movie Review

The Namesake Movie Review

Mira Nair's latest film, a translation of Jhumpa Lahiri's emphatically praised book The Namesake, caps...

The Last Kiss (2006) Movie Review

The Last Kiss (2006) Movie Review

The catchy pop ballads found on the soundtrack for Tony Goldwyn's The Last Kiss will...

School for Scoundrels Movie Review

School for Scoundrels Movie Review

In School for Scoundrels, director Todd Phillips (Road Trip) proves that his truest virtue is...

Poseidon Movie Review

Poseidon Movie Review

34 years ago, The Poseidon Adventure rode the trendy disaster meme of its day to...

Advertisement
The Human Stain Movie Review

The Human Stain Movie Review

Miramax makes its initial bid for Oscar gold with The Human Stain, Robert Benton's torpid...

Bridget Jones: The Edge Of Reason Movie Review

Bridget Jones: The Edge Of Reason Movie Review

In the last three years, Renée Zellweger has lost all 25 pounds of her Bridget...

Ladder 49 Movie Review

Ladder 49 Movie Review

Firefighter movies resemble westerns in the singular fact that I can see one decent one...

The Human Stain Movie Review

The Human Stain Movie Review

Director Robert Benton's quietly compelling adaptation of Philip Roth's novel "The Human Stain" has two...

Ladder 49 Movie Review

Ladder 49 Movie Review

The third line of dialogue in "Ladder 49" is the all too familiar refrain "I'm...

Bridget Jones: The Edge Of Reason Movie Review

Bridget Jones: The Edge Of Reason Movie Review

In "Bridget Jones: The Edge of Reason," the "singleton" Everygal neuroses of its titular British...

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