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Isabelle Huppert at the 89th Annual Academy Awards (Oscars 2017) held at the Dolby Theatre at the Hollywood & Highland Center - Los Angeles, California, United States - Sunday 26th February 2017

Isabelle Huppert
Isabelle Huppert
Isabelle Huppert
Isabelle Huppert

Isabelle Huppert at the 89th Annual Academy Awards (Oscars 2017) held at the Dolby Theatre at the Hollywood & Highland Center - Los Angeles, California, United States - Sunday 26th February 2017

Isabelle Huppert

Isabelle Huppert at the 2017 Film Independent Spirit Awards - Santa Monica, Los Angeles, California, United States - Saturday 25th February 2017

Isabelle Huppert
Isabelle Huppert
Isabelle Huppert
Isabelle Huppert

Isabelle Huppert in the press room at the 2017 Film Independent Spirit Awards held in Santa Monica Beach - Los Angeles, California, United States - Saturday 25th February 2017

Isabelle Huppert
Isabelle Huppert
Isabelle Huppert
Isabelle Huppert

Isabelle Huppert in the press room at the 70th EE British Academy Of Film And Television Arts Awards at the Royal Albert Hall in London, United Kingdom - Sunday 12th February 2017

Isabelle Huppert

Isabelle Huppert pose in the winners' room at the 70th EE British Academy of Film and Television Arts Awards at the Royal Albert Hall in London, United Kingdom - Sunday 12th February 2017

Isabelle Huppert

Isabelle Huppert in the winners room at the EE British Academy Film Awards 2017 (BAFTAs) held at the Royal Albert Hall - London, United Kingdom - Sunday 12th February 2017

Isabelle Huppert

Isabelle Huppert at the 2017 EE British Academy Film Awards held at the Royal Albert Hall - London, United Kingdom - Sunday 12th February 2017

Isabelle Huppert
Isabelle Huppert

Isabelle Huppert at the 2017 EE British Academy Film Awards held at the Royal Albert Hall - London, United Kingdom - Sunday 12th February 2017

Isabelle Huppert

Isabelle Huppert at the 16th Annual AARP Magazine's 'Movies For Grownups' Awards at The Beverly Wilshire Four Seasons Hotel - Beverly Hills, California, United States - Tuesday 7th February 2017

Isabelle Huppert
Isabelle Huppert
Isabelle Huppert
Isabelle Huppert
Isabelle Huppert
Isabelle Huppert

Elle - Trailer and Clips


Like her career, Michèle has always micromanaged her life; she's constantly in control and has an demeanour about her that makes her almost indestructible. This is all changed when she is attacked in her home, a space people associate as a safe haven.

Michèle deals with the attack in her own way and tracks down the man who assaulted her and the foes are both drawn into a dangerous game which could lead to either of them being killed.

Elle is based on Philippe Djian's novel 'Oh', director Paul Verhoeven explains how he was given the original idea from producer Said Ben Said: "The idea wasn't mine; it came from the producer, Saïd Ben Saïd. He contacted me in the US, sent me Philippe Djian's novel, which I read and found very interesting. I knew we had the material for a movie, but I had to think it through and find my way of appropriating a story I would never have come up with myself."

Elle Review

Excellent

There's a boldly comical tone to this outrageous thriller that can't help but unnerve audiences right the way through to a chilling climax. Directed by Paul Verhoeven (Basic Instinct), it's all rather bonkers, but it's also darkly grounded in a multi-layered performance from the great Isabelle Huppert. Shocking plot twists, nasty violence and sex, characters who refuse to behave like the usual stereotypes - the film is bracingly original and riotously unforgettable.

Huppert plays Michele, who owns a Paris videogame company with her best friend Anna (Anne Consigny). She's utterly unapologetic about how she approaches her life, including the fact that she has just been violently assaulted by a masked man who broke into her home. But there's a reason for her refusal to go to the police: when she was 10, her father went on a violent killing spree, putting her face all over the press as her father was sentenced to life in prison. Even so, her ex-husband Richard (Charles Berling) is horrified that she wouldn't report a rape to the cops. Her nervous neighbours Patrick and Rebecca (Laurent Lafitte and Virginie Efira) offer support. But Michele insists on handling everything on her own terms, including how she deals with her senile mother (Judith Magre) and her dim son (Jonas Bloquet) and his psycho pregnant girlfriend (Alice Isaaz).

As always, Huppert underplays the role beautifully, conveying more in a stony glance than most actors do with an emotional tirade. She gives Michele a fierce internal energy that leads to jaw-dropping actions. As her situation gets increasingly urgent, Alice refuses to panic. It's a tour-de-force performance that often takes the breath away because Michele's stubbornness is so blackly hilarious. The other characters swirl around her haplessly, and each actor adds his or her own details that bring them to life in unexpected ways.

Continue reading: Elle Review

White Material Review


Excellent
Claire Denis resolutely refuses to make simple movies, so this intense drama set during a civil war in central Africa feels somewhat elusive as it concentrates on emotions rather than plotting. But it's still riveting.

Maria (Huppert) is passionate about her family's coffee plantation, which she runs with her ex-husband Andre (Lambert) and her father-in-law (Subor). She's sure that a violent clash between the army and rebels will pass them by, so she works to make sure the harvest goes as planned. But Andre, now married to a local woman (Ado), is more realistic. And their late-teen son Manuel (Duvachelle) is struggling to find his identity. Meanwhile, an iconic rebel leader (De Bankole) has taken refuge in Maria's home.

Continue reading: White Material Review

VillaAmalia Review


Very Good
Insinuating and enigmatic filmmaking adds to the central mystery of this intensely personal odyssey, which gets under the skin even as it begins to feel a bit meandering and ill-defined. But of course, Huppert is magnificent.

Ann (Huppert) is rattled one evening by two events: she sees her partner Thomas (Beauvois) kissing another woman and she runs into Georges (Anglade), an old friend who knew her before she became a famous pianist. Suddenly she decides to leave her current life behind, dumping Thomas, selling her flat and hitting the road. And Georges is the only person she tells; to everyone else she has simply vanished. She ends up on an isolated Italian island, where her life is redefined by her new friends (Bindi and Sansa). But can she fully escape her past?

Continue reading: VillaAmalia Review

White Material Trailer


White Material gets its UK cinema released on July 2nd 2010.

Continue: White Material Trailer

Home Review


Very Good
With this playful fable, filmmaker Meier takes a clever look at family life by placing the characters in a surreal location and then twisting things outrageously. And terrific acting makes it surprisingly resonant.

Marthe and Michel (Huppert and Gourmet) live in idyllic isolation on an unfinished highway with their three children: snarky sunbather Judith (Leroux), obsessive teen Marion (Budd) and lively young Julien (Klein). But their quiet life is about to be shattered when, after 10 years, Route E57 is finally opened. Suddenly, they're cut off from work and school by a crowded, high-speed motorway. But while Marion frets about pollution, Marthe refuses to leave her beloved home, leaving Michel no choice but to take drastic action.

Continue reading: Home Review

Private Property Review


Very Good
Sibling rivalry and real estate disputes are two great topics for cinematic drama. Mix the two together, and you can hope for some serious combustion. In Private Property, divorced Pascale (the always elegant Isabelle Huppert) lives with her twenty-something twin sons, François (Yannick Renier) and Thierry (Jérémie Renier) on a beautiful Belgian farm that she won in a bitter divorce ten years earlier. The stage is set.

It's a strange life. When Pascale is not battling her ex-husband over money, she's trying to control her bratty sons, who seem to have no desire whatsoever to behave like adults. François is more of a mama's boy, while Thierry has a temper and has traditionally sided with his father in family disputes. Pascale, who only now is starting to date again, needs to break out of this routine.

Continue reading: Private Property Review

Gabrielle Review


Very Good
With fangs still dripping dark blood, Gabrielle comes to us like Neil LaBute rewriting Henrik Ibsen's classic A Doll's House. Don't let that get you too excited: The film is also very slow, psychological, and just slightly experimental in its score and use of text as language. In fact, there's little mystery why the film was held for nearly nine months since its premiere at last years New York Film Festival and Toronto Film Festival.

Jean Hervey (Pascal Greggory) speaks eloquently (in voice over) about his wealth and his friends as he steps off a train and begins his short trek home. He talks at length about his distinguished, attenuated dinners that he throws for friends every Thursday, and then begins to talk about his wife, Gabrielle (Isabelle Huppert). We watch them dine at a huge table of friends, including the editor in charge of Jean's newspaper who spews theory on the decline of theater. Gabrielle talks lovingly of Jean, as if he is the only man deserving of oxygen. Not but a few days later, Jean, still in voice over, is pontificating on how Gabrielle is his "favorite possession" when all of a sudden he finds a letter on his desk. What is disclosed in this letter will cause Jean and Gabrielle to be at each other's throats for the entirety of the film, with both parties drawing a bit of blood.

Continue reading: Gabrielle Review

Gabrielle Review


Very Good
With fangs still dripping dark blood, Gabrielle comes to us like Neil LaBute rewriting Henrik Ibsen's classic A Doll's House. Don't let that get you too excited: The film is also very slow, psychological, and just slightly experimental in its score and use of text as language. In fact, there's little mystery why the film was held for nearly nine months since its premiere at last years New York Film Festival and Toronto Film Festival.

Jean Hervey (Pascal Greggory) speaks eloquently (in voice over) about his wealth and his friends as he steps off a train and begins his short trek home. He talks at length about his distinguished, attenuated dinners that he throws for friends every Thursday, and then begins to talk about his wife, Gabrielle (Isabelle Huppert). We watch them dine at a huge table of friends, including the editor in charge of Jean's newspaper who spews theory on the decline of theater. Gabrielle talks lovingly of Jean, as if he is the only man deserving of oxygen. Not but a few days later, Jean, still in voice over, is pontificating on how Gabrielle is his "favorite possession" when all of a sudden he finds a letter on his desk. What is disclosed in this letter will cause Jean and Gabrielle to be at each other's throats for the entirety of the film, with both parties drawing a bit of blood.

Continue reading: Gabrielle Review

Henri Cartier-Bresson: The Impassioned Eye Review


Good
This appreciation of a still photographer some think of as the grand master of them all demonstrates Henri Cartier-Bresson's ability to consistently make art out of people in the midst of their lives, capturing perfect compositional moments and angles with his camera. What we see of his work merits all the praise lavished upon him, though the documentary content leaves one wishing for less in the way of rambling, unfocused articulation.

Unless artists are also big, charismatic personalities in their own right, documentaries that feature them are inclined (doomed?) to be a bit of a snooze. Their appearance from behind their instrument of art making --in this case a camera-- often fails to rise to eloquence or cinematic drama. But that element aside, the work itself conveys considerable impact. The DVD will hold interest for those who want to examine Cartier-Bresson's extraordinary work along with his creative thought processes and its effect on a few of his subjects and observers. Study value, not entertainment.

Continue reading: Henri Cartier-Bresson: The Impassioned Eye Review

The Swindle Review


Weak
There's no denying that Claude Chabrol is a master of the French thriller. But every once in awhile, even the best throw up a brick. The Swindle is workmanlike at best, a tired flick (Chabrol's 50th!) that even devoted fans will shrug their shoulders at.

Judging by the title and the con-game setup, we're on alert for twists from the very beginning: Betty (Isabelle Huppert) is seen with an obvious mark at a casino. Soon she's got him back in his hotel room, drugged, and lets in an older man who's been watching the pair. He turns out to be her partner Victor (Michel Serrault), and they take 1/3 of the mark's money (not so much that he'd miss it) and vanish back to their RV. These guys are small time and they know it. Nothing wrong with that, but while planning their next move, Betty decides to take a vacation. She and Victor reconnect a few weeks later at a mountain resort, and she's apparently got another swindle going with a wealthy man carrying 5 million Swiss francs in an attache case. Obviously Betty's going to make a play for it, but is Victor going to be in on the deal too? Or is he going to try to nab it all for himself?

Continue reading: The Swindle Review

Madame Bovary Review


Very Good
Claude Chabrol hasn't made many adaptations of classic literature, but he proves to have a capable, if stuffy, hand with Madame Bovary. Isabelle Huppert takes center stage as a poor gal who just wants to get ahead. She does so by marrying one Dr. Charles Bovary, who truns out to be a real drip. Driven by passion, she embarks on a series of affairs while taking on debt to pay for her finery, debt which eventually drives her to extreme measures. Huppert has an interesting take on the character, but the rest of the cast is rather staid. Typical period flourishes abound, too.

Ma Mère Review


OK
At some point, there won't be any taboos left to ostensibly shatter, and what will French imports do then? Ma Mère is the newest Gallic provocation to come to these shores, though unlike some others (the dismal Anatomy of Hell, say) it has actually been paid attention to by the ratings board, thusly the NC-17 for "strong and aberrant sexual content." The aberrance this time isn't just the coital mingling of older women and younger men (a la last year's The Piano Teacher, which also starred Isabelle Huppert) but also incest, just for kicks. The idea was controversial enough when it was used in the film's source, the titular 1960s Georges Bataille novel, but here it's more likely to cause yawns than outrage.

The strapping youth whom the film places at the intersecting desires of three women is Pierre (Louis Garrel), a somewhat idle guy who, after his father's mysterious death, gets sucked into the orbit of his self-destructive mother, Helène (Huppert). This involves a lot of gamesmanship whereby Helène tries to push Pierre into more and more outlandish behavior, especially with her wastrel friend Réa (Joane Preiss), whom she's more than a little chummy with. At first, Helène pushes Pierre towards Réa, seemingly as a way of having one-degree-of-separation sex with him, watching longingly as Réa screws Pierre in public, blasé strangers wandering past. It's easy to see why these three are pushing themselves to such extremes, given the film's bland setting in the Grand Canaries - with its California-like, mildly libidinous atmosphere and constant, enervating sunlight. But unfortunately that doesn't mean there's much depth to it at all, no matter how much philosophical and religious piffle writer/director Christophe Honoré puts into Pierre's portentous voiceovers.

Continue reading: Ma Mère Review

Elective Affinities Review


OK
If someone asked me to identify a prototypical "art film," I could do no better than to point them to Elective Affinities, a low-budget period piece from Italy, featuring circuitous dialogue, a story based on a Goethe novel, and an absolutely awful title.

Elective Affinities tracks a foursome in a Tuscan villa who couple in a variety of formations. There's bad feelings and a baby, but most of all there's a whole lotta talking about emotions -- with a pseudo-scientific explanation of love as a mathematical equation (which, sort of, explains the title).

Continue reading: Elective Affinities Review

Going Places (1974) Review


Excellent
Talk about aimless: These two hooligans (Gérard Depardieu and Patrick Dewaere) wander across the whole of France, simply looking for trouble. Namely that includes stealing cars and bedding women (usually in a three-way), then running away from whatever trouble they find themselves in -- whether they end up with a gruesome suicide on their hands or nurse from a lactating woman's breast on a train. And oh, it's a comedy. Quite funny, with a strangely perverted sensibility you aren't likely to find in many other films.

Continue reading: Going Places (1974) Review

The Time Of The Wolf Review


Good
What is it about French filmmakers and the word "wolf?" This is the second French film in three years to ostensibly cover the lupine species... even though it doesn't really.

Director Michael Haneke (The Piano Teacher) offers a tantalizing setup this go-round, yet he ultimately does nothing with it. Here's the gist: A family arrives at their vacation house under suspicious (and weirdly hazy) circumstances, only to find squatters living inside. Soon Haneke reveals that some (unexplained) apocalyptic event has transpired, scattering people across the countryside. What happens when people try to survive a nuclear winter (or thereabouts)? Does soceity break down or does it rebuild?

Continue reading: The Time Of The Wolf Review

Les Destinées Review


Weak
Do you like plates? Like, really nice plates? Perhaps fine porcelain plates made in the 1900s-1920s in Limoges, France?

You better damn well like plates if you're going to suffer through the three hours of Les Destinées, an exhausting family drama about a porcelain empire and just as hard a flick as its subject matter.

Continue reading: Les Destinées Review

Lumiere And Company Review


Good
A documentary-ish experiment: Give 40 movie directors the world's first movie camera (the Lumiere cinematograph, 1895) and 52 seconds in which to shoot their own mini-film. Some of the directors go all out (David Lynch and some French people I've never heard of)... and some are pathetic, self-ego-massaging wastes of time (particularly Spike Lee, who uses his 52 seconds trying to get his baby to say "Dada"). Also curious is how many directors made movies about making movies (methinks that's all they know any more). But how often can you see 40 films, the making-of story, and an interview with the director, all in an hour and a half? Once in a lifetime is just about enough.

Amateur Review


Good
Hal Hartley's latest film, Amateur, is quite a departure from his earlier work. Still gone is his once-traditional lead, the crimson-haired ingenue Adrienne Shelly (who hasn't been seen since Trust), and in her stead are two foreign actresses, Isabelle Huppert (as a lapsed nun trying to make it as a porn story writer and who believes she is a nymphomaniac) and Elena Lowensohn (returning to Hartley's films as Sofia, a somewhat psycho porn star). Hartley's favorite male lead, Martin Donovan, remains as Thomas, the slimeball husband of Sofia.

The plot is this: Sofia is fed up with Thomas, so she tries to kill him. He doesn't die--he just cracks his head and develops amnesia. Isabelle finds him and takes him under her already fragile wing. Throw in an extortion plot wherein the old Thomas was trying to blackmail a nameless entity, and add the thugs trying to kill him. Eventually, everyone gets sucked into this scheme, and nothing works out for any of them.

Continue reading: Amateur Review

La Cérémonie Review


Excellent
Tireless French director Claude Chabrol returns to top form with the existential mind-scrambler La Cérémonie, a creepy and disturbing movie that gets under your skin from the very beginning. We know something bad is going to happen -- we just don't know what.

Sandrine Bonnaire (so memorable in East/West) plays a simple maid named Sophie -- so simple in fact that she doesn't know how to read. Hired on by an affluent family living in a large estate in a small town in the north of France, she proves herself an impeccable housekeeper. But when the man of the house calls home for her to fetch files off her desk or the matriarch hands her the shopping list, she invents excuses as to why they can't be done, all in an effort to hide her illiteracy.

Continue reading: La Cérémonie Review

Isabelle Huppert

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Isabelle Huppert Movies

Happy End  Movie Review

Happy End Movie Review

Austrian auteur Michael Haneke isn't known for his light touch, but rather for hard-hitting, award-winning...

Elle Trailer

Elle Trailer

Like her career, Michèle has always micromanaged her life; she's constantly in control and has...

Elle Movie Review

Elle Movie Review

There's a boldly comical tone to this outrageous thriller that can't help but unnerve audiences...

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Louder Than Bombs Trailer

Louder Than Bombs Trailer

The death of Isabelle Reed thrusts her family consisting of her husband Conrad Reed (Devin...

The Disappearance Of Eleanor Rigby Trailer

The Disappearance Of Eleanor Rigby Trailer

Conor (James McAvoy) and Eleanor (Jessica Chastain) play a couple who fall in love and...

Dead Man Down Movie Review

Dead Man Down Movie Review

Here's yet another preposterous action movie that's made watchable by a skilful director and an...

Amour Trailer

Amour Trailer

Anne and Georges are a devoted, elderly couple who both used to be music teachers....

Amour Movie Review

Amour Movie Review

A striking look at a long-term relationship, this film is an antidote to those who...

White Material Movie Review

White Material Movie Review

Claire Denis resolutely refuses to make simple movies, so this intense drama set during a...

VillaAmalia Movie Review

VillaAmalia Movie Review

Insinuating and enigmatic filmmaking adds to the central mystery of this intensely personal odyssey, which...

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