Isabella Rossellini

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Isabella Rossellini seen alone and with co-star Kyle MacLachlan and her son Roberto Rossellini Jr. at a private screening of David Lynch's 1986 movie 'Blue Velvet' sponsored by Agent Provocateur and held at The Museum of Modern Art. - New York, United States - Tuesday 25th October 2016

Isabella Rossellini and Kyle Maclachlan
Isabella Rossellini
Isabella Rossellini
Isabella Rossellini
Isabella Rossellini and Roberto Rossellini
Isabella Rossellini and Roberto Rossellini

Joy Review

Extraordinary

After Silver Linings Playbook and American Hustle, mercurial filmmaker David O. Russell reunites with Jennifer Lawrence, Bradley Cooper and Robert De Niro for an offbeat biopic about the woman who invented the Miracle Mop. It's such a quirky movie that it's destined to divide audiences, but there's magic in Russell's loose, inventive filmmaking style. And this lively story has a lot to say about the tenacity required to achieve the American dream.

Joy Mangano (Lawrence) is the only sensible person in her family, so she's been running the household most of her life. But now things are getting a bit too complicated, as her father Rudy (De Niro) moves back into the house after his second marriage fails, Joy's mother Terry (Virginia Madsen) does little but watch her favourite soap opera, Joy's ex-husband Tony (Edgar Ramirez) lives in the basement pursuing his dream of becoming a pop star, and her sister (Dascha Polanco) undermines everything she does. As Joy cares for her own children, it's only her grandmother (Diane Ladd) who has any confidence in her. And when she has a flash of inspiration and creates a self-wringing mop, getting it on the market is an uphill battle. Finally, she catches the attention of Neil (Bradley Cooper), who runs a brand new shopping network called QVC.

The story spans some 40 years, during which Russell gleefully parallels Joy's family chaos with the lurid soap on Terry's television. Of the people around Joy, only Grandma, Tony and her childhood buddy Peggy (Elizabeth Rohm) believe in her. So even though her dad's new girlfriend (the fabulous Isabella Rossellini) invests in her mop, no one thinks she'll achieve any real success. This means that Joy's journey is a series of sometimes outrageous obstacles both within and outside her immediate circle. And of course the biggest barrier is her gender, because almost no one accepts the idea that she might be a genius.

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Isabella Rossellini - New York premiere of 'Joy' at the Ziegfeld Theater - Arrivals at Ziegfeld Theater - New York, United States - Sunday 13th December 2015

Isabella Rossellini
Isabella Rossellini

Isabella Rossellini - "Joy" New York Premiere - Red Carpet Arrivals - New York, New York, United States - Monday 14th December 2015

Isabella Rossellini
Isabella Rossellini
Isabella Rossellini and Roberto Rossellini
Isabella Rossellini
Isabella Rossellini
Isabella Rossellini

Joy Trailer


Joy Mangano always wanted to be an inventor and, after getting married, having three children and then getting divorced, she finally decides to follow her dream. It's often the male entrepreneurs that people remember in history, but Joy proves that women can be just as powerful as she rises to become president of her own company, Ingenious Designs, and invents the cutting edge cleaning system, 'Miracle Mop'; all while taking care of a family on her own and running into some difficult circumstances along the way. Betrayed, occasionally on the wrong side of the law and suffering from many losses, Joy is the living embodiment of what doesn't kill you makes you stronger - and with millions of dollars in sales, she's certainly stronger.

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Isabella Rossellini - Isabella Rossellini attends a presentation of the monologue 'Green Porno, Live on Stage' - Madrid, Spain - Thursday 4th June 2015

Isabella Rossellini
Isabella Rossellini
Isabella Rossellini
Isabella Rossellini
Isabella Rossellini
Isabella Rossellini

Isabella Rossellini - 58th San Francisco International Film Festival - 'Isabella Rossellini's Green Porno Live' - Screening at Castro Theatre - San Francisco, California, United States - Sunday 26th April 2015

Isabella Rossellini
Noah Cowen and Isabella Rossellini
Isabella Rossellini and Jody Shapiro
Isabella Rossellini
Noah Cowen and Isabella Rossellini
Isabella Rossellini and Jody Shapiro

Enemy Review


Excellent

This may be a thriller starring Jake Gyllenhaal, but mainstream audiences should also note that this is an artful film that refuses to tell its story using the usual formula. For some viewers, this psychological angle will be exhilarating and challenging, although it might feel elusive to others. Either way, Canadian filmmaker Denis Villeneuve (Prisoners) has boldly made a film that defies expectations and gives Gyllenhaal two of his strongest performances in years.

Yes, he plays two roles in this doppleganger mystery. We meet him as Adam, a Toronto history professor with a beautiful but busy girlfriend Mary (Melanie Laurent) and a dull repetitious life. One evening he watches a movie at home that features an extra who looks exactly like him, so he sets out to learn more about the actor, credited as "Daniel Saint Claire", although everyone calls him Anthony. Adam discovers that Anthony's wife Helen (Sarah Gadon) is six months pregnant, and when the two men meet they are both disarmed that they look so exactly alike, down to their scars. Adam's mother (Isabella Rossellini) insists that he doesn't have a long-lost twin. Then things start to take a darker turn as the two men begin to learn things about each other.

Director Villeneuve is superb at getting under the skin of his characters, and the film is shot and edited to take us right into Adam's troubled mind, revealing his more shadowy inner corners through movie clips and creepy cutaways that may or may not be part of Anthony's freaky secret life, which involves some sort of elite sex club. Villeneuve further builds the mood with a horror-style musical score (by Danny Bensi and Saunder Jurriaans) and insinuating, sexy editing. He also resolutely refuses to explain what everything means, including the central plot itself, preferring to challenge viewers to internalise everything and discover their own explanation.

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Enemy Trailer


Adam Bell is a fairly ordinary man in a loving relationship and with a stable job. However, his life is turned upside down when he watches a movie and sees an actor bearing an uncanny resemblance to him. Shocked, he decides to track down the actor, named Anthony St. Claire, at his address but becomes spooked when he calls his house and is immediately assumed to be Anthony by his wife. With Adam's own girlfriend becoming increasingly suspicious by his jumpy and distracted behaviour and his mother insisting that he is her one and only son, Adam decides to meet his doppelganger. However, things don't go as smoothly as planned when Anthony decides he wants to sleep with Adam's partner. With his obsession consuming his life and harming the people around him, Adam must evaluate himself mentally in order to get his life back.

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Two Lovers Review


Excellent
Joaquin Phoenix has a reputation for diving heartily into roles, and his starring turn in James Gray's Two Lovers is no exception. In the film's first scene, Phoenix's dive is literal: A Brooklyn kid plunging into the bay in an arresting setup that rings of despair and confusion. It's an appropriate introduction to Phoenix's delicate character development, a performance that buoys an impressive romantic drama.

And that's a genre we don't see too often anymore: romantic drama. Today's cinematic romances are usually steeped in light comedy (even decent ones like Definitely, Maybe) or predictable form posing as drama. But Two Lovers is hardcore drama, with desire at its center. Or more accurately, two desires.

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Wild At Heart Review


OK
Was there any film so anxiously awaited in the late 1980s and early 1990s as Wild at Heart? The picture was released to a cult that had just been born: that of its director, David Lynch, whose Blue Velvet, in 1986, had reaped an enthusiastic following among the mainstream hipsters who had missed Eraserhead in 1977, and whose budding appetite for Lynch's singular brand of the macabre had been whetted by the prime-time ghoulishness of 1990's Twin Peaks. Wild at Heart's Palme d'Or win at Cannes just before its 1990 release only tantalized more; and after what seemed for Lynch's starving fans a nearly eternal wait, the film opened at last to high expectations, but decidedly mixed reviews.

Wild at Heart was puzzling, because it was screwed up and it was hard to figure out why. Time - and, 14 years later, the DVD release - helps to clear up that central enigma. Based very loosely on Barry Gifford's novel, this manic, Southern Gothic road movie now seems too deliberately weird. And in retrospect the cause seems to be that its creator, a strange man if the available evidence of his films is to be believed, and one who then was only recently revered as a certain type of genius, was trying so hard just to be himself.

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Roger Dodger Review


Good
There's a certain kind of movie that I haven't heard a name for but its practitioners are the likes of Woody Allen, John Cassavetes, James Toback, and now Dylan Kidd, the writer/director of Roger Dodger. In their works, plot is an afterthought. The cinematography is at best atmospheric, and at worst, functional. The hearts of these films lie in dialogue, and the more the characters talk, the more they reveal, and the deeper we get into the mystery of who they are and why. We're interested as long as the characters keep talking.

The "Roger Dodger" here (Campbell Scott) does a whole lot of it. He's a mid-30s advertising copywriter in Manhattan, one of those guys who's always wearing a suit and smoking aggressively even though his job and lifestyle demand neither. Roger spends his lunch hours entertaining his colleagues with mildly aggressive (and brilliantly written) speeches about men and women and their evolutionary destiny and his nights trying to pull the same routine on women in bars. His refrain is that men work extraordinarily hard for sex because deep down they know it's just a matter of a few generations until they become unnecessary for procreation. He then proves his own case by saddling up to a woman and speechifying on how he's got her all figured out. Roger, of course, doesn't realize that your friends let you prattle on because they like you and are willing to indulge. Strangers just think you're being rude. Or maybe Roger does realize it, which is even creepier.

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Empire Review


Good
When you stop and think about it, the similarities between Italian mobsters and urban gangsters -- as filmmakers commonly portray them -- are really quite astounding. For every gold chain stuck in a mobster's chest hair, there seems to be a corresponding gold medallion slung around some gangster's neck. For every Cadillac, there's a Lincoln Navigator. In place of the Tommy gun, there's the Glock. It's a comparison that writer and director Franc Reyes is all too keen on making in his debut film, Empire.

Played by John Leguizamo, Victor Rosa is a Latino gangsta with all the ambition of a young Godfather and all the attitude of a taller Joe Pesci. He spends his days violently whacking errant drug dealers and monitoring the sales of his own designer "street pharmaceutical" not so subtly labeled Empire -- which is exactly what Vic thinks he's building in his little bit of the South Bronx. But when his girlfriend (Delilah Cotto) announces that she's pregnant, he thinks it might be time to go legit.

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Left Luggage Review


OK
Topol, where have you been since Fiddler on the Roof? Ah, the triumphant hero returns in a small role in Left Luggage, an overly sentimental (and manipulative) film about the plight of Hasidic Jews in 1970s Antwerp. Laura Fraser (the Scottish answer to Eliza Dushku) plays a modern Jewish girl with modern sensibilities (she wears pants) who takes a nanny job with a Hasidic family in order to pay the rent. So backwards, the family's father (Jeroen Krabbé, who also directed the film) isn't even impressed when she gets their four year old to say his first word -- instead saying he should be asking the questions of the Seder instead of saying "Quack." Meanwhile, Laura's father (Maximilian Schell) is digging up Antwerp in search of his lost bags from WWII. And we are asked to sympathize with all of these cases, unsuccessfully. Based on the novel Twee Koffers Vol.

Empire Review


Weak

Any chance that "Empire" might be all that different from other drug- dealer- trying- to- go- straight movies is lost with the opening voice-over, in which heroin mini-kingpin Victor Rosa (John Leguizamo) rattles off a dozen street life clichés in 60 seconds, starting with the line, "Damn, if I'd known then what I know now! It's all about making money, baby."

Never mind that the plot includes the hero losing his shirt and his boss's drug money in a Wall Street scam perpetrated by a savvy, Caucasian, uptown con artist. That only serves to prove that Victor is a sucker, not that his story is any different from those of drug dealers depicted in scads of other movies from the last 15 years -- October's "Paid In Full" or 1994's "Sugar Hill," for example.

Universal Pictures even admits as much in the film's press kit, which compares it "in theme and execution" to a "list of urban gangster films" but goes on to trumpet the fact that "Empire" is the first time this recycled story "has been told from the point of view of a Latino character."

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Isabella Rossellini Movies

Joy Movie Review

Joy Movie Review

After Silver Linings Playbook and American Hustle, mercurial filmmaker David O. Russell reunites with Jennifer...

Joy Trailer

Joy Trailer

Joy Mangano always wanted to be an inventor and, after getting married, having three children...

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Enemy Movie Review

Enemy Movie Review

This may be a thriller starring Jake Gyllenhaal, but mainstream audiences should also note that...

Enemy Trailer

Enemy Trailer

Adam Bell is a fairly ordinary man in a loving relationship and with a stable...

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Two Lovers Movie Review

Two Lovers Movie Review

Joaquin Phoenix has a reputation for diving heartily into roles, and his starring turn in...

Two Lovers Trailer

Two Lovers Trailer

Watch the trailer for Two Lovers. After an unsuccessful suicide attempt, Leonard moves back into...

Infamous Movie Review

Infamous Movie Review

If the cogs of the movie-making machine are going to keep turning out the exact...

The Architect Movie Review

The Architect Movie Review

Just what it is about architects that fascinates filmmakers so? Is it the metaphorical possibilities...

Heights Movie Review

Heights Movie Review

Since the modern cinema could easily be said to have a chronic Glenn Close deficiency,...

Big Night Movie Review

Big Night Movie Review

One reality in this world is certain: nice guys finish last. And while...

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