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The 28th European Film Awards (Europaeischer Filmpreis) - Arrivals

Guest , Isabel Coixet - The 28th European Film Awards (Europaeischer Filmpreis) at Haus der Berliner Festspiele - Arrivals at Haus der Berliner Festspiele - Berlin, Germany - Saturday 12th December 2015

Guest and Isabel Coixet
Isabel Coixet
Isabel Coixet

Learning To Drive Trailer


Manhattan book critic Wendy is forced to adjust to a dramatic life change when her husband leaves her for a younger woman, and sets out to reclaim her independence. The problem is, having lived in the Big Apple all her life, she has never learned to drive. So the fiery writer decides to take lessons from Darwan, a softly spoken, patient taxi driver from India who is about to embark on an arranged marriage. As the pair get to know each other behind the wheel, they both learn valuable lessons, and an unlikely friendship develops between these two very different New Yorkers. It's a friendship that will change their lives for ever.

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65th Berlin International Film Festival

Isabel Coixet (l) and actress Juliette Binoche - 65th Berlin International Film Festival (Berlinale) - 'Nobody Wants the Night' - Photocall at Hotel Hyatt - Berlin, Germany - Thursday 5th February 2015

Isabel Coixet, Juliette Binoche and Berlin
Isabel Coixet
Isabel Coixet, Juliette Binoche and Berlin

Penelope Cruz Reuniting With Director Isabel Coixet


Penelope Cruz Isabel Coixet

Actress Penelope Cruz is reuniting with director Isabel Coixet to star in new romantic drama This Man, This Woman.

The Volver beauty will portray a woman who runs into her ex-boyfriend on a plane and relives memories of their turbulent relationship, which was complicated by his affair with a talk show host, played by Inglourious Basterds star Diane Kruger, reports Deadline.com.

The movie's script was penned by Eyes Wide Shut screenwriter Frederic Raphael and is expected to be a hot commodity next month (Feb15) when it is offered for sale at the European Film Market in Berlin, Germany, where Coixet's new release, Nobody Wants the Night, is due to open the Berlin International Film Festival. The two events are held simultaneously every year.

Continue reading: Penelope Cruz Reuniting With Director Isabel Coixet

TIFF - 'Learning To Drive' - Premiere

Isabel Coixet and Patricia Clarkson - Toronto International Film Festival (TIFF) - 'Learning To Drive' - Premiere - Toronto, Canada - Tuesday 9th September 2014

Isabel Coixet and Patricia Clarkson
Isabel Coixet
Isabel Coixet

Rome International Film Festival

Isabel Coixet - Rome International Film Festival - 'Another Me' - Photocall - Rome, Italy - Friday 15th November 2013

Isabel Coixet
Isabel Coixet
Isabel Coixet

At Day 3 Of The 41st Sitges Film Festival

Isabel Coixet Saturday 4th October 2008 at day 3 of the 41st Sitges Film Festival Barcelona, Spain

Isabel Coixet
Isabel Coixet

Paris, Je T'aime Review


OK
One would like to think that there at least a few other cities in the world besides Paris that could have inspired a film as varied in the types of cinematic pleasure so ably delivered by the anthology piece Paris Je T'Aime -- but it seems unlikely. This isn't due to an unavailability of good stories or locations in many other great metropolises, but more because being able to dangle the possibility of shooting in Paris in front of the world's greatest directors is going to be so much more enticing. Also, there are few other cities besides Paris that come with such a powerful and multifarious wealth of preassociated images and emotions for both filmmaker and audience to both draw upon and react against. So what could have been a collection of short films with a few highs, several lows, and a lot of muddled in-betweens is in fact a remarkably and consistently imaginative body of work, practically giddy with energy, that only rarely touches the ground.

Project overseers Emmanuel Benbihy and Tristan Carné wanted to create a cinematic map of Paris, with each short film representing one of the city's 20 arrondissements (neighborhoods). They ended up with 18 films, none of them more than a few minutes long and directed by a glittering, international roster of filmmakers. While none of the films here are anything approaching masterpieces, hardly a one is in any way a chore to sit through, which has to be some sort of an accomplishment.

Continue reading: Paris, Je T'aime Review

The Secret Life Of Words Review


Grim

The electro-jazz two-step that plays as the credits roll over the beginning of Isabel Coixet's The Secret Life of Words is terribly misleading, as is most of the music that is used in the film: David Byrne, Blood, Sweat & Tears, and Portuguese pop. The only song that fits in fact, besides the small bursts of wind instruments and opera, is Antony and the Johnson's harrowing "Hope There's Someone," a song so morose, moody, and beautiful that when it's used, my attention strained more to it than of Coixet's images. There's a reason for that.

Josef (Tim Robbins) lies on a bed, blinded and scarred by a fire that killed his best friend on the oil rig they both worked on. Hanna (Sarah Polley), on forced vacation from her warehouse work employer, quickly takes a temporary position as his nurse, doing anything to stay in some sort of routine. She starts out isolated and completely silent but she soon befriends the men on the oil rig while tending to the charming but haunted Josef. She talks about food and jokes with Simon the chef (Javier Cámara) and talks about waves and the sea with the nervy Martin (Daniel Mays). However, she doesn't really reveal herself to anyone but Josef, and most of the film is made up of conversations between them. When it becomes obvious that Josef needs more serious work, Hanna spends a last night with him, telling him about why she is so reserved and regulated. Josef gets better and attempts to reconnect with Hanna through her counselor (Julie Christie) and sees if they might have something real between them.

Continue reading: The Secret Life Of Words Review

The Secret Life Of Words Review


Grim
The electro-jazz two-step that plays as the credits roll over the beginning of Isabel Coixet's The Secret Life of Words is terribly misleading, as is most of the music that is used in the film: David Byrne, Blood, Sweat & Tears, and Portuguese pop. The only song that fits in fact, besides the small bursts of wind instruments and opera, is Antony and the Johnson's harrowing "Hope There's Someone," a song so morose, moody, and beautiful that when it's used, my attention strained more to it than of Coixet's images. There's a reason for that.

Josef (Tim Robbins) lies on a bed, blinded and scarred by a fire that killed his best friend on the oil rig they both worked on. Hanna (Sarah Polley), on forced vacation from her warehouse work employer, quickly takes a temporary position as his nurse, doing anything to stay in some sort of routine. She starts out isolated and completely silent but she soon befriends the men on the oil rig while tending to the charming but haunted Josef. She talks about food and jokes with Simon the chef (Javier Cámara) and talks about waves and the sea with the nervy Martin (Daniel Mays). However, she doesn't really reveal herself to anyone but Josef, and most of the film is made up of conversations between them. When it becomes obvious that Josef needs more serious work, Hanna spends a last night with him, telling him about why she is so reserved and regulated. Josef gets better and attempts to reconnect with Hanna through her counselor (Julie Christie) and sees if they might have something real between them.

Continue reading: The Secret Life Of Words Review

My Life Without Me Review


Grim
Focusing an entire dramatic film on death can be tricky. Death drives an enormous range of emotions, from fear to sadness, to curiosity; yet, most movies treat death with overwrought nobility, excessive weepiness, or yikes, both (see: Pay It Forward). Spanish director Isabel Coixet's first English-language feature suffers from the first sin, treating a young women's impending death with a stagy aloofness that cheats the film of more complex emotions.

The unfortunate woman is 24-year-old Ann (the always appealing Sarah Polley), a struggling wife and mother who learns that a raging cancer will kill her in just a few months. Ann's initial response is to hide the news from her mother (Deborah Harry); very matter-of-factly, she continues to follow that M.O. by telling no one, including her husband Don (Scott Speedman, grinning way too much).

Continue reading: My Life Without Me Review

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