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Ewan McGregor Declares He Would Be Up For 'Trainspotting' Sequel With Director Danny Boyle


Ewan McGregor Danny Boyle Irvine Welsh

Ewan McGregor has said he would be up for revisiting the role of heroin addict Renton in a sequel to 1996’s Trainspotting, if director Danny Boyle was also on board. Speaking at the Edinburgh film festival, McGregor also revealed there’s no longer any bad blood between himself and the director after their much publicised falling out in the late 90s.

Ewan mcgregorEwan McGregor at the Edinburgh film festival

When asked if he’d now return for a Trainspotting sequel McGregor said he has changed his mind on the subject and would now say yes. “I would be up for it,” McGregor said. “I’ve said that to Danny. Everybody has talked about it and speculated about it, but I don’t if it’s happening yet. I’ve not seen a script and I don’t know if there is one. It’s been a long, long time.”

Continue reading: Ewan McGregor Declares He Would Be Up For 'Trainspotting' Sequel With Director Danny Boyle

How Irvine Welsh's Begbie is Coming Back to Support Homeless People


Irvine Welsh

When Irvine Welsh released Trainspotting back in 1993, it became a cult classic. And this wasn’t despite the harrowing subject matter, accented pros and consistent drug abuse, rather because of them. Now, after the film received similar adulation, Begbie is back, and he’s here to help the homeless.

Irvine WelshBegbie came from this man's head - Irvine Welsh

The sociopathic Begbie - played by Robert Carlyle in the film - isn’t exactly the charitable sort – more interested in incredibly violent episodes and hamming up stories when the truth is somewhat different. But his creator, Irvine Welsh, despite conjuring up many twisted souls in his stories, reignited the character to feature in The Big Issue and help homeless people.

Continue reading: How Irvine Welsh's Begbie is Coming Back to Support Homeless People

"The Filth" UK Premiere Sees James McAvoy In What Might Be His Most Challenging Role Yet


James McAvoy Irvine Welsh

Filth, Jon S. Baird’s adaptation of the eponymous Irvine Welsch novel Filth, starring James McAvoy. The actor, known for his roles in X-Men: First Class, Wanted and, once upon a time The Chronicles of Narnia, has definitely switched gears for this one. McAvoy plays corrupt cop Bruce Robertson, who struggles with bipolar disorder, whilst engaging in practically every vice, known to humanity. As you may have guessed, the actor’s overall nice guy persona made him a less than obvious choice for the part. However, in a recent interview with The Hollywood Reporter, which McAvoy gave at the film’s Zurich Film Festival premiere, he explained why he took on the challenge of playing so starkly against type.

Filth Poster
The poster leaves little doubt - this is going to be one of those "love it or hate it" films.

“This was simply one of the best scripts I'd ever read. In the top three, McAvoy says. “It's up there with Atonement. A beautiful and harrowing script.”

Continue reading: "The Filth" UK Premiere Sees James McAvoy In What Might Be His Most Challenging Role Yet

James McAvoy Is Filthy Good in Movie Version of Irvine Welsh's 'Filth' [Trailer + Pictures]


James McAvoy Irvine Welsh

It was an ambitious project, but one that seems to have paid off. Transferring Irvine Welsh’s brilliantly disgusting character, Bruce Robertson from page to screen in Filth sees James McAvoy excel, further swelling his already brilliant reputation.

Filth PosterThe critics have been waxing lyrical about Filth

The story follows Robertson – who is in fact an officer of the law, he’s PC Robertson – as he goes about his debouched ways. When a promotion rears its head and our benter-then-bent cop is enlisted to solve a brutal murder, he’ll stop at nothing to get what he wants, even if the aspirations of his colleagues threaten to block his path.

Continue reading: James McAvoy Is Filthy Good in Movie Version of Irvine Welsh's 'Filth' [Trailer + Pictures]

Riding High - James McAvoy Will Take on Any Role, Even Jimmy Savile


James McAvoy Irvine Welsh

With his role in Filth, James McAvoy is a liberated man. His talents have been celebrated, both on the screen and on stage, and with a wave of critical praise pushing him forward, he’s ready to take on even the most challenging and controversial of roles, even that of Jimmy Savile.

James McAvoyMcAvoy in Welcome to The Punch.

Irvine Welsh, who wrote the book on which McAvoy’s film is adapted from, also penned the 1996 collection, Ecstasy. One of the stories from that collected, entitled Lorraine Goes to Livingston, sees Freddy Royle - a fictitious children's TV presenter who turns out to be a child molester.

Continue reading: Riding High - James McAvoy Will Take on Any Role, Even Jimmy Savile

UK premiere Of Filth

Irvine Welsh - UK premiere of Filth held at the Odeon - Arrivals - London, United Kingdom - Monday 30th September 2013

Irvine Welsh
Irvine Welsh
Irvine Welsh and James McAvoy

Filth UK Premiere

Irvine Welsh and James McAvoy - 'Filth' Uk Film Premiere at Odeon West End - Arrivals Where: London, United Kingdom When: 30 September 2013 - London, United Kingdom - Monday 30th September 2013

Irvine Welsh and James McAvoy

UK premiere of Filth

Irvine Welsh and James McAvoy - The London premiere of "Filth" at Odeon West End - London, United Kingdom - Monday 30th September 2013

Irvine Welsh and James McAvoy
Irvine Welsh
Irvine Welsh

UK premiere of Filth

Irvine Welsh - UK premiere of Filth held at the Odeon - Arrivals - London, United Kingdom - Saturday 1st January 2000

James McAvoy and Irvine Welsh
James McAvoy and Irvine Welsh
James McAvoy and Irvine Welsh
Irvine Welsh

Filth UK Premiere

James McAvoy and Irvine Welsh - 'Filth' UK film premiere held at the Odeon West End - Arrivals. - London, United Kingdom - Monday 30th September 2013

James McAvoy
James McAvoy
James McAvoy and Joy McAvoy
James McAvoy
James McAvoy

James McAvoy in 'Filth' > Robert de Niro in 'Taxi Driver'? Big Claim


James McAvoy Irvine Welsh Robert De Niro

The temptation to place classic performances, films and music on a pedestal and never let your mind’s eye topple them is strong. We hold a robust affection for culture gone by, and often struggle to let modern talent permeate the pantheon of classic big-screen behemoths.

James McAvoyMcAvoy in Welcome to The Punch

'Tosh,' says Irvine Welsh, who asserts that James McAvoy’s performance in Filth is better than that of Robert De Niro’s in Taxi Driver – a turn that would forever ensure him legendary status.

Continue reading: James McAvoy in 'Filth' > Robert de Niro in 'Taxi Driver'? Big Claim

Just How Filthy is Filth? James McAvoy Reveals All


James McAvoy Irvine Welsh

James McAvoy continues to assert himself as one of the finer actors of his generation. In his new film, Filth – one of Irvine Welsh’s fruitier novels – fans of the Scottish actor might just have their nerve tested as he indulges in possibly the worst (and best) character created by the Trainspotting author.

James McAvoyMcAvoy in Welcome to The Punch.

Bruce Robertson, as you’ll see in the trailer below, is a narcotic-infused, alcohol-swilling, nymphomaniac party-beast who also happens to be a part of Edinburgh’s police force. He’s PC Bruce Robinson, but he isn’t politically correct, not one bit.

Continue reading: Just How Filthy is Filth? James McAvoy Reveals All

James McAvoy Needs To Clean Up His Act In Filth (Trailer)


James McAvoy Irvine Welsh Jamie Bell Imogen Poots Jim Broadbent

Filth, the latest movie to star James McAvoy, is an adaptation of Irvine Welsh’s novel of the same name and it has all the hallmarks of a classic Irvine Welsh movie adaptation, with its fast-paced, seedy cinematography and wry, snappy humour. The word filth takes on two meanings here. McAvoy plays the central character Bruce Robertson, who – by all accounts, is a pretty filthy kinda guy, he’s into some fairly unsavoury sexual practises and when his doctor asks if he’s been taking his medication, he’s only able to sort-of-honestly answer ‘yes’ because of all the illicit substances he’s been snorting. That’s not the only kind of ‘filth’ he is though – he’s also a police officer. A Detective Sergeant no less.

Robertson’s not one for abiding by the law, however and even when he’s on duty, he’s a pretty deceitful, dishonest kind of guy and will do anything to get one over on his colleagues, so that he can get a promotion. However, the combination of mind-altering drugs and the fact that he’s collapsing under a mountain of lies soon starts to take a toll on his sanity and wellbeing. Add to that the fact that he has a troubled marriage that he’s desperate to save and things aren’t looking great for him, all told.

This red-band trailer precedes the September release of the movie which also stars Jamie Bell, Imogen Poots, Joanne Froggett and Jim Broadbent

Continue reading: James McAvoy Needs To Clean Up His Act In Filth (Trailer)

The Acid House Review


Excellent
The late '90s should be cinematically remembered as the years of the new wave drug movie. In the late '80s and the early '90s, the drug movie was nothing more than a simple comic device... there was no meaning behind the cloud of pot smoke produced by Cheech and Chong. Then, starting in 1996 with the British smash Trainspotting, the drug movie suddenly took on a dual persona of both cautionary tale and comedy of errors. Since Trainspotting, two truly exemplary drug movies have come along... one American and one Scottish. The American is the bizarre Gen-X foray into the surreal, Go. The Scottish is The Acid House.

Although only one part of The Acid House directly deals with LSD, the majority of the movie feels as if it were written and directed the drug. Much like Go gave an accurate portrayal of X, The Acid House gives an accurate portrayal of the Super Mario... um... or so I heard.

Continue reading: The Acid House Review

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