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Dying Of The Light - Trailer


Trapped in a terrorist prison and tortured, Evan Lake (Nicholas Cage) is eventually free and makes his way back to the United States and the CIA where he works. Becoming a hero for surviving and not revealing any secrets throughout his imprisonment, Lake's protégé, Milton Schultz, (Anton Yelchin) discovers that the man who held him hostage - the villainous terrorist Banir (Alexander Karim) - is alive and still active. After announcing to his supervisors the revelation, it is discovered that Lake is beginning to suffer from dementia and is faced with early retirement. But unable to leave a job undone, Lake and Schultz take it upon themselves to bring Banir to justice; fuelled by both the intent for justice and revenge.

Continue: Dying Of The Light - Trailer

The Inner Life of Martin Frost Review


OK
The work of Paul Auster can be an acquired taste, but his Inner Life of Martin Frost is so sweet and harmless that even the most jaded of moviegoers ought to find it a breezy way to spend 90 minutes, lost in Auster's weird fantasy land.

Martin Frost (David Thewlis) is a novelist, and he's off to the country for a vacation after finishing his latest book and to work on a new story. No sooner does he fall asleep, though, that he wakes up to find someone else in his bed, Claire Martin (Irène Jacob), who initially says she was lent the house by the same guy who lent it to Martin. Funny coincidence, eh? Just like their names: His first is Martin, her last is Martin. It helps that she's a hot, exotic French beauty with an active libido, and soon she's got her top off as they roll around in the sheets.

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The Double Life of Veronique Review


Excellent
Before he made hism Three Colors trilogy (Blue, White, and Red), Krzysztof Kieslowski made what might have been the crowning achievement of a distinguished career. I say "might" because The Double Life of Veronique is a difficult film that, even after several viewings, doesn't give up its secrets easily. It is also one of those rare films that, when you get down to it, isn't really about anything at all. The film's meaning is held in what you, the viewer, decide to read into it.

That's fitting, because Veronique is a film all about subjectivity. The setup is simple. What follows is not. Here's the idea that Kieslowski sat down with when deciding to make the film: Two women look identical and have similar lives, despite living in different countries. They are both even named Veronique, almost. Veronique (Irène Jacob) is a French woman who aspires to be a concert hall vocalist. Weronika (also Jacob, of course) is a Polish woman, a singer as well. They are born on the same day and even share a medical condition, which leads Veronique to drop dead on the eve of her big break.

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Battle Of The Brave Review


Grim
Epic romance, period setting (18th century war between Britain and France over control of Canada), amazing cast (check out the last few names), Celine Dion song on the soundtrack... sounds like a recipe for success. Unfortunately, it was not to be. The film was retitled from its original Nouvelle-France to the generic Battle of the Brave and eventually dumped on DVD, at least in the U.S.

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Beyond The Clouds Review


OK
Michelangelo Antonioni obsesses on the naked bodies of a good half-dozen Euro-stars in this wandering tour of western European sexual relations in various combinations. Based on a collection of his own short stories, Antonioni connects four such tales (infidelity, happenstance, old-fashioned horniness, etc.) with the narrative of a film director (John Malkovich) who's looking for a story to base his next movie on. We find we're lucky enough if we can just get one story out of this two-hour ordeal, which wanders aimlessly in art-house hell as often as it enchants.

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Spy Games Review


Weak
Serious-funny-romantic? Irène Jacob as a Russian spy? Well, Spy Games is a rough production, which probably explains why you've never heard of this film. Jacob and Bill Pullman are on opposite sides of the post-Cold War spy game... all while trying to get it on. It's very silly and improbable, but the leads -- and the inimitable Bruno Kirby -- are hard not to like.

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The Big Brass Ring Review


OK
Extremely convoluted and complex political thriller, made only because Orson Welles was in the process of making it (and starring from his own script) when he died in 1985. The political melodrama was intended as a "bookend" to Citizen Kane, but this ain't no Rosebud.

Othello Review


Grim
Seldomly have I been so outright disappointed by a film. Othello's problems are numerous, and given the outstanding cast put together for the film (and an admitted masterpiece to work with), it's amazing that this film comes off as being so downright bad.

The story's been around for 400 years. Othello (Lawrence Fishburne) is a Moorish general in the Italian army, and he is the victim of constant prejudice. Desdemona (Irene Jacob) is his Italian lover, and when the pair secretly marry, Othello finds himself the victim of a fiendish plot by his servant Iago (Kenneth Branagh). Iago's motives are also magnified by the presence of young Cassio (Nathaniel Parker), who serves as Othello's right-hand man despite Iago's longer term of service.

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Victory Review


Grim
Fairly pedantic and plodding, this period piece, set in 1913 in the Dutch East Indies (ah, I remember the Dutch East Indies...), this film has all the makings of a sultry romance (think The Piano) but never amounts to much more than a watery day-trip.

The convoluted story has a female violinist (Irène Jacob) shanghaied from her indentured servitude by a semi-wealthy island-dweller (Willem Dafoe). Naturally, the woman's owner becomes a bit miffed and sends some goons (including Rufus Sewell and Sam Neill in a rare bad-guy role) after them. Imagine the hijinks!

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Red (Trois couleurs: Rouge) Review


Extraordinary
A satisfying conclusion to Krzysztof Kieslowski's spectacular Polish-French-Swiss Three Colors trilogy (with Blue and White), Red is like a French version of The Twilight Zone, following a young model named Valentine (Irène Jacob) through a series of hypnotic meetings with a retired judge (Jean-Louis Trintignant). A mystery unfolds as Valentine discovers the judge's penchant for eavesdropping on his neighbor's calls, which leads to all sorts of romantic mystery and tragedy as secrets are unwittingly revealed and lawsuits are filed. Not even the audience becomes fully aware of the intricacies of the picture until its fantastic conclusion.

Red stands as Kieslowski's most convoluted and difficult work of the series, exploring far more than the idea of "fraternity" suggested by the color and delving deep into symbolism and our notion of "coincidence." Jacob is wonderfully watchable in her most nuanced role ever, and Trintignant's crustiness is bizarrely engaging, making you want to dig deeper into his oddly apathetic character who wants "nothing" further from life. Red is confusing but compulsively watchable.

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My Life So Far Review


Grim
I guess you're either one of those people who loves 1930's Scottish coming-of-age stories, or you're not.

Looks like I'm not.

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