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Hercules - Extended Trailer


Following his deadly ordeal of being put through the Twelve Labours by his father Zeus and his people, all Hercules wants from life is to rest quietly with a loving family. Unfortunately for him, now is not the time for resting as the gods have delivered another bout of chaos to the world. Being well known by all as a man with all the strength of a god, Hercules is forced to lead a battle against a new menace as the King of Thrace gets him and some like minded warriors to band together as the world's most formidable army. They must defeat a powerful rival general as the vicious descendents of Hades infect the land. It's a deadly mission, the minions of hell being immortal and ruthless, and their defeat can only be accomplished by someone with power above the mortal realm.

Continue: Hercules - Extended Trailer

Sacha Baron Cohen Adds To 'Grimsby' Cast With McShane, Harewood, Sidibe And Vegas


Sacha Baron Cohen Johnny Vegas Ian McShane David Harewood Gabourey Sidibe Mark Strong

Sacha Baron Cohen’s spoof spy comedy, ‘Grimsby’, is beginning to take shape. According to the Hollywood Reporter, actor Ian McShane (Hercules) David Harewood (Homeland), Gabourey Sidibe (Precious) and English comedian Johnny Vegas have all been added.

Sacha Baron CohenSacha Baron Cohen's new comedy has a stellar cast behind it

Produced by Baron Cohen and Nira Park, and executive produced by Louise Rosner, Todd Schulman, Johnston, Baynham, James Biddle, Eric Fellner, Tim Bevan,Ant Hines and Adam McKay, the story focuses on a British black-ops spy (Mark Strong), who, forced to go on the run, teams up with his hapless brother, an English football hooligan (Baron Cohen).

Continue reading: Sacha Baron Cohen Adds To 'Grimsby' Cast With McShane, Harewood, Sidibe And Vegas

The Rock Tweets Us Another Sneak Peak At The Upcoming Hercules Film


Dwayne Johnson Ian McShane John Hurt

Does the latest behind the scenes picture from Dwayne 'The Rock' Johnson's upcoming turn as Hercules give away loads of details about what the plot with entail? IT DOESN'T MATTER! How about loads of cool snaps of some of the props and costume design? IT DOESN'T MATTER! How about a quick look at the set design? Yes, yes it does.


Continue reading: The Rock Tweets Us Another Sneak Peak At The Upcoming Hercules Film

Jack The Giant Slayer Trailer


Jack is a young farmhand working for the King. One day, he comes across small bean-like objects, which are described as 'holy relics' from a faraway land. The relics, however, are full of dark magic and could change the world if placed in the wrong hands. Jack is entrusted with them, on the condition that he doesn't lose them or get them wet. Jack is puzzled but accepts the relics anyway.

That night, a terrible storm rages. Jack has left the bean shaped objects on a surface in his hut, where rain falls on them through a hole in the ceiling. At first, nothing happens; then Jack looks on in horror as a beanstalk grows from the ground under his hut. The beanstalk connects the human world to a world where giants roam.

Jack lands himself in trouble when a giant kidnaps the beautiful Princess Isabelle. The King sends some of his best men up the beanstalk with Jack to rescue Isabelle. Their rescue attempts are nearly in vain, though, when the giants wage war on the humans. It is up to Jack to save Isabelle and his kingdom.

Jack The Giant Killer is directed and produced by Bryan Singer, who is well known for directing the films The Usual Suspects; Superman Returns and the X-Men films. The film is based on the British fairy tale; the screenplay for the film was written by Christopher McQuarrie and Dan Studney.

Starring: Nicholas Hoult, Ewan McGregor, Stanley Tucci, Warwick Davis, Bill Nighy, Eddie Marsan, Ian McShane, Ewen Bremner, John Kassir, Eleanor Tomlinson, Ralph Brown, Ben Daniels, Daniel Lapaine and David Frost

Director: Bryan Singer
Release Date: 15TH June 2012
Certificate: TBC
Running Time: TBC

Ian McShane - Ian McShane and family London, England - 'Pirates of the Caribbean: On Stranger Tides' UK film premiere - Afterparty held at Massimo Restaurant Thursday 12th May 2011

Ian Mcshane
Ian Mcshane
Ian Mcshane

Pirates Of The Caribbean: On Stranger Tides Trailer


The trailer for the fourth instalment from The Pirates Of The Caribbean franchise has arrived! Captain Jack Sparrow once again takes to the high seas in an adventure that's sure to be immensely entertaining. When a beautiful yet deadly woman from Jack's past appears once again, he's unsure of her intentions but once she forces him to join her on the ruthless Blackbeard's ship called Queen Anne's Revenge asking to find the infamous fountain of youth, he knows there's sure to be plenty of danger ahead. Not only that but the captain also finds himself in the much colder climates than he's used to when his quest takes him to London.

Continue: Pirates Of The Caribbean: On Stranger Tides Trailer

Case 39 Review


Good
The truth is this: you can never have too many evil child thrillers, especially when they star Oscar-winning actresses. This ramshackle movie features a preposterous plot, dodgy direction and clunky editing, and yet it's great fun to watch the actors squirm with fear.

Emily (Zellweger) is a social worker barely keeping up with 38 cases when her boss (Lester) hands her one more. It centres on 10-year-old Lily (Ferland), whose parents (Rennie and O'Malley) might be abusing her. Surely when they lock her in an oven and switch on the heat, something is wrong. Emily rescues Lily and takes her in, turning to two friends for help: a child counsellor (Cooper) and a cop (McShane). The cop is important because something is clearly not right with Lily.

Continue reading: Case 39 Review

44 Inch Chest Review


Good
With its limited setting, contained cast and existential plot, this feels more like a play than a film. So while it's well-acted by a first-rate cast, it also feels somewhat indulgent and oddly unsatisfying.

Colin (Winstone) is a complete wreck after his wife Liz (Whalley) leaves him.

He's so distraught that his pals (Wilkinson, Hurt, McShane and Dillane) get together and kidnap the other man (Poupaud) so Colin can get his revenge. Now they're all in a disused house somewhere in London, as Colin's friends try to help him get control of his emotions. Flashbacks and fantasies ensue as Colin tries to figure out what to do, and whether an act of murderous violence will help soothe his soul.

Continue reading: 44 Inch Chest Review

44 Inch Chest Trailer


Watch the trailer for 44 Inch Chest

Continue: 44 Inch Chest Trailer

Ian McShane Tuesday 10th February 2009 on the set of 'Kings' filming in Brooklyn New York City, USA

Ian Mcshane
Ian Mcshane
Ian Mcshane
Ian Mcshane
Ian Mcshane
Ian Mcshane

Coraline Review


Very Good
Remember The Nightmare Before Christmas? The holiday classic is invariably credited to its producer and story writer Tim Burton, but the film was actually directed by New Jersey native Henry Selick, an animator on Pete's Dragon and The Fox and the Hound who met Burton when they both worked at Disney in the '80s. Selick finally returns to the world of stop-motion animation once again, which he used solely in both Nightmare and the 1996 Roald Dahl adaptation James and the Giant Peach, with Coraline, another adaptation of a cryptic children's fable, this one written by literary goth overlord Neil Gaiman.

Like Alice in Wonderland reconfigured for David Lynch fans, this eerie-yet-elegant tale sets its sights on the blue-haired, oddly-named girl who gives the film its title. Voiced with energy and outre charm by Dakota Fanning, Coraline is the only child of a pair of Michigan-alum parents (Teri Hatcher and John Hodgman) who write garden catalogues as their daughter explores the dire tundra outside their new home. Prompted by curiosity and ongoing rows over mom's bad casserole and drab taste in clothing, the parilous scamp ultimately unlocks a small door and finds herself in a world where the land outside glows like Christmas lights, her Other Father is a buoyant inventor, and her Other Mother (both voiced by the same players) always cooks a luxurious feast. The catch: Everyone, including the neighbors and their pets, has black buttons for eyes.

Continue reading: Coraline Review

Ian McShane - Ian McShane and guest Monday 24th November 2008 at Ziegfeld Theatre New York City, USA

Ian Mcshane

Death Race Review


Terrible
Movies like Death Race exist so critics will have something to put on their year-end "Worst Of" lists.

Technically, it's a remake of Paul Bartel's schlocky Death Race 2000 from 1975. But director Paul W.S. Anderson also uses his gig as an excuse to revisit every innocent-man-behind-bars cliché that has been introduced from then 'til now.

Continue reading: Death Race Review

Ian McShane Wednesday 6th August 2008 'Death Race' (2008) Directed by Paul W.S. Anderson USA - 2008

Ian McShane Sunday 18th May 2008 53rd Drama Desk Awards New York City, USA

Ian Mcshane
Ian Mcshane

Ian McShane and Harold Pinter - Ian McShane, Gwen McShane & his children Kate McShane & Morgan McShane Opening night of Harold Pinter's 'The Homecoming' at the Cort Theatre on Broadway - Opening night of Harold Pinter's 'The Homecoming' at the Cort Theatre on Broadway - Afterparty Sunday 16th December 2007

Ian Mcshane and Harold Pinter
Ian Mcshane and Harold Pinter
Michael Mckean, Harold Pinter and Ian Mcshane
Ian Mcshane and Harold Pinter
Ian Mcshane and Harold Pinter
Ian Mcshane and Harold Pinter

Ian McShane and Harold Pinter Sunday 16th December 2007 Opening night of Harold Pinter's 'The Homecoming' at the Cort Theatre on Broadway - Departures Opening night of Harold Pinter's 'The Homecoming' at the Cort Theatre on Broadway

Ian Mcshane and Harold Pinter
Ian Mcshane and Harold Pinter
Ian Mcshane and Harold Pinter

Ian McShane Sunday 4th November 2007 at the opening night performance of Tom Stoppard's 'Rock 'N' Roll' at the Jacobs Theatre New York City, USA

Ian Mcshane
Ian Mcshane
Ian Mcshane

Hot Rod Review


Very Good
If you're reading this review of Hot Rod, you are likely on the internet, which means you have probably seen previous work by filmmakers Andy Samberg (star), Jorma Taccone (co-star), and Akiva Schaffer (director), whose Saturday Night Live snippets have been passed around the web almost as much as quotes misattributed to George Carlin. And if you've read other reviews of Hot Rod anywhere, you've heard about how Samberg and company went from minor online sensation (as part of video-comedy troupe The Lonely Island) to SNL staff (Samberg performs, Taccone and Schaffer write) to SNL internet ambassadors (most famously for the rap video "Lazy Sunday") to, finally, a keen summer job translating their sketch-comedy sensibility to the big screen.

But the appeal of Hot Rod is simpler than viral internet paradigm shifts: it is a very silly movie with a nature equal parts good and strange. Samberg plays Rod, who we infer from other characters to be a twentysomething, but who based on demeanor, ambition, and Samberg's crooked, sometimes crazed smile may be as young as 12. Rod's goal of becoming a much-loved, professional, stand-alone stuntman is such a deliberate anachronism that it's almost completely original, if not for the faintly memorable existence of Evel Knieval -- an existence that gives Rod a lot of hope (his deceased father's profession is explained as more or less Knieval's understudy).

Continue reading: Hot Rod Review

Ian McShane - Ian McShane and guests Monday 11th June 2007 at Odeon Leicester Square London, England

Ian Mcshane
Ian Mcshane

Ian McShane - Monday 11th June 2007 at Odeon Leicester Square London, England

Ian Mcshane

Scoop Review


OK
Maybe it was just too soon. Maybe after coming back so strongly with last year's bracing morality thriller Match Point, Woody Allen should have taken a year or so off. Caught up on his reading, taken care of the garden, whatever. But, being the manically productive filmmaker that he is, he had to follow up his best film in years almost immediately after with another one, Scoop, featuring his newest favorite leading lady Scarlett Johansson (we are many years removed from the Mia Farrow and Diane Keaton phases), and a 180-degree turn in mood. No icy tension or investigations of ethical behavior this time, just hijinks and one-liners -- though for the second time in a row, the most famously New York-centric filmmaker sets the action in London. As Allen's character in Scoop notes, the restaurants are great, and the theater's better.

Taking a page from his last truly funny frivolous comedy, Manhattan Murder Mystery, Allen puts a pair of fairly clueless but nosy characters in the middle of a murder mystery and hopes that their bickering will carry the day. It almost does. Johansson is a long way from her previous Allen role as a soulless social-climber, playing this time American journalism student Sondra Pransky, who's so awkward and out of her element that, in order to get a story, she sleeps with a famous actor, and then forgets to get the interview. Johansson's better at playing daffy than one might expect, and unlike films like The Devil Wears Prada -- where a bad sweater and bangs are supposed to make Anne Hathaway some sort of hideous ogre -- this one doesn't pretend that she's unattractive behind the big glasses and careless hair.

Continue reading: Scoop Review

We Are Marshall Review


Good
Football fans (myself included) talk a lot about pain. The physical sport relies heavily on violent verbiage: We got killed out there today, we're going to slaughter that team, and so on. Those terms have never seemed more inappropriate than they do right now.

In 1970, the West Virginia-based Marshall University learned the true meaning of pain in the face of a loss. The team lost family and friends tied to the small school's football program when a plane crashed on its way home from East Carolina University. Administration, coaches, and surviving players left behind due to injury faced difficult decisions in the aftermath of the tragedy -- should they scrap the program or field a team of substitutes and play in honor of the deceased?

Continue reading: We Are Marshall Review

The Last Of Shiela Review


Excellent
The odd pair of Anthony Perkins and Stephen Sondheim wrote this underseen thriller, a whodunit that puts widower James Coburn on a boat with his old friends, one of whom may have accidentally run over his wife a year ago in an unsolved hit-and-run. Is Coburn's live-action mystery game a clever way to ferret out the killer? Or is something more mysterious at work here? The body count will nearly fill a hand before a few days on the yacht are up, but it's the impressive cast and twisty script that will keep you watching to see who gets it next... and who gets away with it all.

Scoop Review


OK
Maybe it was just too soon. Maybe after coming back so strongly with last year's bracing morality thriller Match Point, Woody Allen should have taken a year or so off. Caught up on his reading, taken care of the garden, whatever. But, being the manically productive filmmaker that he is, he had to follow up his best film in years almost immediately after with another one, Scoop, featuring his newest favorite leading lady Scarlett Johansson (we are many years removed from the Mia Farrow and Diane Keaton phases), and a 180-degree turn in mood. No icy tension or investigations of ethical behavior this time, just hijinks and one-liners -- though for the second time in a row, the most famously New York-centric filmmaker sets the action in London. As Allen's character in Scoop notes, the restaurants are great, and the theater's better.

Taking a page from his last truly funny frivolous comedy, Manhattan Murder Mystery, Allen puts a pair of fairly clueless but nosy characters in the middle of a murder mystery and hopes that their bickering will carry the day. It almost does. Johansson is a long way from her previous Allen role as a soulless social-climber, playing this time American journalism student Sondra Pransky, who's so awkward and out of her element that, in order to get a story, she sleeps with a famous actor, and then forgets to get the interview. Johansson's better at playing daffy than one might expect, and unlike films like The Devil Wears Prada -- where a bad sweater and bangs are supposed to make Anne Hathaway some sort of hideous ogre -- this one doesn't pretend that she's unattractive behind the big glasses and careless hair.

Continue reading: Scoop Review

Nemesis Game Review


Good
In the grand history of live-action-role-playing-games-gone-wrong-in-the-movies (Gotcha!, T.A.G., Subterano) comes Nemesis Game, in which players attempt to answer Hobbit-esque riddles in search of, well, in search of something that I never really figured out.

Who's behind the game, how exactly it is played, why people are playing, and even who's footing the bill for the thing are questions that will have to go ananswered. Even the most casual viewer will be inevitably frustrated and completely baffled by the inexplicable story in Nemesis Game, but I have to admit that despite a massive failing in the plot department I actually had fun watching this film.

Continue reading: Nemesis Game Review

Nine Lives Review


Weak
A well-cast compilation film suffocating on its own self-importance, Nine Lives aims to tie together nine vastly different stories, but ends up telling hardly any of them well. The conceit of writer/director Rodrigo Garcia is to take nine vignettes, each centered around a different woman (usually in desperate circumstances), and give us a brief glimpse into her life before cutting away to the next one, while stringing a few connecting threads between them all. To ensure that he's not playing favorites, each piece is done in one single Steadicam shot and kept to only nine or ten minutes in length. A minor character from one vignette becomes a major player later on, or vice versa. As in literature, anthology works like this are a hit-and-miss affair, and in this case the misses far outnumber the ones that connect.

Nine Lives opens strong on Sandra (Elpidia Carrillo), an imprisoned mother. Mopping up a floor, she's threatened by fellow prisoners, and harassed by a guard (Miguel Sandoval) who's convinced she can give him information. Everyone tells Sandra she's not going to make it, but you think she just might be able to, hunkering down turtle-like and just plowing through the rest of her sentence. But then her daughter visits, and the phone doesn't work, sending Sandra into a stunning explosion of rage, like a mother bear kept from her cub. It's a short, unrelentingly powerful story, and done by itself it would stand as a sublime little tragedy. The same goes for the final piece, in which Glenn Close and Dakota Fanning (hardly a better match could be imagined) visit a cemetery and talk with sublime ease about not much at all. But then comes the rest of the film in between.

Continue reading: Nine Lives Review

Agent Cody Banks Review


Bad
I recently read an article that argued TV shows like CSI and James Bond movies are primarily responsible for young people's increased interest in criminal forensics and special military forces. Since Hollywood is both smart and shameless, it uses these notions to its advantage, devouring the success of Bond and vomiting up films like Spy Kids and Agent Cody Banks. Although the original Spy Kids worked, Agent Cody Banks proves that things seldom taste as good a second or third time.

Agent Cody Banks was made just to make money, and to stock Toys 'R' Us shelves and McDonald's Happy Meal boxes with cheap action figures. The script, which feels like the cheapest writers available threw it together in a week, is actually quite impressive in how every mind-numbing scene attempts to manipulate the minds of susceptible adolescents. It uses every trick in the book, from pre-teen humor and Bond rip-offs, to busty secret agents, phony special effects, and, of course, Frankie Muniz. If -- God forbid -- the movie is a hit, the producers have even secured an easy sequel with its carefully formulated ending.

Continue reading: Agent Cody Banks Review

Sexy Beast Review


Very Good

Director Jonathan Glazer does such a spectacular job of drawing the audience into the world he creates in the edgy, oily and feral British crime thriller "Sexy Beast" that within moments of its opening -- poolside at a retired bank robber's modest desert villa on the Spanish Costa del Sol -- you may actually start fanning yourself from the 100-degree weather on screen.

It's the kind of vicarious reaction felt over and over again through the course of the movie. You truly understand the intense devotion between the ex-con Gary "Gal" Dove (played by the awesome Ray Winstone) and his aging ex-porn queen wife (Amanda Redman). You savor Gal's utterly relaxed bliss at finally living in a world far, far away from his former life. You feel how much he enjoys the company of pal and former associate Aitch (Cavan Kendall) and his wife (Julianne White), who live near by and often come over for barbecue.

But more than anything, you feel in your bones how completely terrified every last one of them is of Don Logan.

Continue reading: Sexy Beast Review

Agent Cody Banks Review


OK

Yes, "Agent Cody Banks" is a "Spy Kids" clone. As such, I went into it expecting an uncreative, cash-in-on-a-trend children's movie -- the kind parents are loathe to suffer through, yet for some reason take their kids to see anyway.

But while its plot doesn't stand up to even a modest amount of logical scrutiny, the flick has a comical, junior-James Bond spirit that's hard to resist. Of course, there are a couple differences between James Bond and highly-trained CIA spook Cody Banks (played by "Malcolm In the Middle's" Frankie Muniz): 1) Cody is 15 and lives with his parents who don't know he's a spy, and 2) Cody is hopelessly inept at talking to girls.

His tendency to get tongue-tied around cute classmates becomes a major problem when his hubba-hubba CIA handler (Angie Harmon from "Law & Order") assigns him to get close to the adorable Natalie Conners (Hilary Duff, better known as the Disney Channel's "Lizzie McGuire"). It seems the girl's scientist father is unknowingly developing nanobot technology for a villain (the ominously tan Ian McShane) who wants the microscopic 'bots to eat away US missile guidance systems. It's part of his evil plan to render the country defenseless for no adequately explored reason.

Continue reading: Agent Cody Banks Review

Ian Mcshane

Ian Mcshane Quick Links

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Ian McShane

Date of birth

29th September, 1942

Occupation

Actor

Sex

Male

Height

1.75


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Ian McShane Movies

Jawbone Movie Review

Jawbone Movie Review

Boxing movies aren't usually this thoughtful. Sure, there are plenty of punchy moments in the...

John Wick: Chapter 2 Movie Review

John Wick: Chapter 2 Movie Review

Keanu Reeves picks up his supremely efficient hitman immediately where the 2015 original left him:...

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John Wick: Chapter 2 Trailer

John Wick: Chapter 2 Trailer

Former hitman John Wick is in Rome following events in the first movie where he...

Grimsby Movie Review

Grimsby Movie Review

Although it contains some memorably outrageous comedy moments, this movie (retitled The Brothers Grimsby for...

Grimsby Trailer

Grimsby Trailer

Nobby is a good ol' northern lad who loves nothing more than spending time with...

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Grimsby - Red Band Teaser Trailer

Grimsby - Red Band Teaser Trailer

Nobby and Sebastian are long lost brothers who live completely different lives. Sebastian is a...

John Wick Movie Review

John Wick Movie Review

There have been so many awful revenge thrillers lately that we've almost forgotten that it's...

John Wick Trailer

John Wick Trailer

John Wick was one of the criminal underground's finest hitmen until the untimely death of...

Hercules Movie Review

Hercules Movie Review

Far more entertaining than it has any right to be, this is a big, messy...

Hercules Trailer

Hercules Trailer

Following his deadly ordeal of being put through the Twelve Labours by his father Zeus...

Hercules - Trailer Trailer

Hercules - Trailer Trailer

Hercules is a bitter and haunted demi-god filled with resentment for the people and the...

Cuban Fury Movie Review

Cuban Fury Movie Review

This is the kind of British rom-com that sneaks up on you when you least...

Cuban Fury Trailer

Cuban Fury Trailer

Bruce Garrett is a self-doubting, overweight office worker who has very little luck with women...

Cuban Fury Trailer

Cuban Fury Trailer

Bruce Garrett may not have much going for him being overweight, low in confidence and...

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