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Hope Davis - Disney/ABC Winter TCA Tour at the Langham Huntington Hotel - Arrivals at Langham Hotel - Pasadena, CA, Disney - Los Angeles, California, United States - Sunday 10th January 2016

Hope Davis
Hope Davis
Hope Davis

Hope Davis - Photographs of a variety of stars as they attended the 2015 FOX Winter Television Critics Association All-Star Party which was held at the Langham Huntington Hotel in Los Angeles, California, United States - Friday 16th January 2015

Hope Davis
Hope Davis
Hope Davis and Scott Cohen

Hope Davis and John Patrick Walker - World premiere of "Winter's Tale at the Ziegfeld Theater - Arrivals - New York City, New York, United States - Tuesday 11th February 2014

Hope Davis and John Patrick Walker
Hope Davis

Hope Davis and Lunt-Fontanne Theatre Monday 23rd April 2012 Broadway opening night of 'Ghost The Musical' at the Lunt-Fontanne Theatre - Arrivals.

Hope Davis and Lunt-fontanne Theatre

Hope Davis Tuesday 13th December 2011 the New York premiere of 'The Iron Lady' at the Ziegfeld Theater. New York City, USA

Hope Davis
Hope Davis
Hope Davis

Hope Davis - Hope Davis, Guests, New York City, USA - at the World Premiere of 'War Horse' at Avery Fisher Hall in the Lincoln Center for The Performing Arts. Sunday 4th December 2011

Hope Davis
Hope Davis

Hope Davis Monday 11th April 2011 Los Angeles Premiere of HBO's Cinema Verite held at Paramount Studios Theatre Los Angeles, California

Hope Davis
Hope Davis
Hope Davis and Marcia Gay Harden
Hope Davis and Marcia Gay Harden
Hope Davis and Marcia Gay Harden

Real Steel Trailer


Charlie Kenton is a former boxer who finds he's given a huge opportunity to make something of his life when he and his estranged son team up to build a robot to fight in a new extreme sport called robot boxing, a hi-tech sport that's become one of the most profitable forms of entertainment in the world.

Continue: Real Steel Trailer

Hope Davis and HBO Wednesday 19th May 2010 Los Angeles Premiere of HBO Films 'The Special Relationship' held at the Director's Guild of America Los Angeles, California

Hope Davis and Hbo
Hope Davis and Hbo

Hope Davis Monday 17th May 2010 69th Annual Peabody Awards at The Waldorf Astoria New York City, USA

Hope Davis Thursday 21st January 2010 Opening night of the Broadway play 'Present Laughter' at the American Airlines Theatre New York City, USA

Hope Davis
Hope Davis

The Lodger Review


Bad
Marie Belloc Lowndes' 1913 novel, The Lodger, based on the grisly Jack the Ripper killings in turn-of-the-century London, has been grist for the movie pulp mill ever since its publication. Knockoff versions of the story trace the history of film, from Pabst's Pandora's Box and all the way to mad psycho James Spader in Jack's Back and Daffy Duck taking on the Shropshire Slasher in Deduce You Say. The most famous version of the novel itself was the first Hitchcock-style Hitchcock film, the 1927 silent The Lodger starring Ivor Novello, who later recreated his role in a 1932 sound remake. The most atmospheric version of the tale was John Brahm's 1944 Fox redux with the creepy Laird Cregar as the notorious murderer.

Now writer/director David Ondaatje has come along with a contemporary version of the story, updated to the mean streets of L.A. in 2009. And this new version of The Lodger also has atmosphere in spades.

Continue reading: The Lodger Review

Synecdoche, New York Review


Weak
If it weren't for Charlie Kaufman, the phrase "famous screenwriter" would be an oxymoron. Kaufman has never won an Oscar, and most people, even true movie geeks, probably couldn't pick him out of a police lineup, but he's the only writer in Hollywood whose name is used to promote his movies. From Being John Malkovich and Adaptation to Confessions of a Dangerous Mind and Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind, each of Kaufman's movies is a singular experience -- quirky, affecting, and humorous. Kaufman's renown as a screenwriter even surpasses that of Quentin Tarantino's back in the mid-nineties, when he penned a string of critical and box-office hits that included Reservoir Dogs, True Romance, and Pulp Fiction. Tarantino's real acclaim, however, came as a result of his work behind the camera, not the keyboard. So it's no surprise to find Kaufman making the same transition in Synecdoche, New York -- his debut film as a director.

Synecdoche (sih-NECK-doh-kee) is a word whose meaning is too long to type out here -- and isn't essential to understanding the film, anyway. But it's just the type of word you might throw in the title of your first movie as a director if you wanted to let people know in advance they're in for something offbeat. And Synecdoche, New York is nothing if not determinedly offbeat.

Continue reading: Synecdoche, New York Review

Synecdoche, New York Trailer


Watch the trailer for Synecdoche, New York

Continue: Synecdoche, New York Trailer

Charlie Bartlett Review


Bad
A hot-ticket item at last year's Tribeca Film Festival and subsequently picked up by the Weinstein Company, Jon Poll's plodding Charlie Bartlett has the gumption to suggest, and then confirm the fact, that rich people, especially rich white kids under 18, have all the answers, and that it is quite foolish to think otherwise.

Kicked out of his latest boarding school for entrepreneurial ingenuity (he made fake IDs), Charlie Bartlett (Anton Yelchin) finally makes his way to public school. His mother (Hope Davis), medicated into oblivion, thinks it will be a perfect outlet for his creativity. As if it weren't written on the wall, Bartlett can only find friends on the short bus and other clique-less annals of the teenage population. That is until he finds the blessings of prescription narcotics and the passivity of modern adults towards their children's problems.

Continue reading: Charlie Bartlett Review

The Nines Review


Very Good
In the opening moments of John August's The Nines, an actor (Ryan Reynolds) drinks, drives, scores some crack, hangs out with a hooker, and totals his car. This series of events reverberates through the film, not so much in its literal consequences -- the story is told through three overlapping segments, only one of which features the actor character -- but rather the scene's jittery disorientation. Barely a moment goes by when someone onscreen isn't feeling confused or ill at ease. Following his accident, the actor is confined to a quiet house arrest, supervised by a cheery PR agent (Melissa McCarthy) and eyed by a stay-at-home mom neighbor (Hope Davis), but this mundane imprisonment starts to feel more like a sort of purgatory. Is it the drugs? The lack of drugs? Are the two seemingly benign women in his life actually part of something greater or more sinister?

We leave the scene before Reynolds finds definite answers, but the three primary actors recur in each of the subsequent sections, playing different characters. In Part II, Reynolds is a TV writer trying to cast his actress friend McCarthy (playing a version of herself, a popular supporting player on Gilmore Girls) in a new series over the objections of a network executive (Davis), who wants to hire an actress with a development deal (it goes almost without saying that said actress also happens to be skinnier and more generic, and is played by frequent network TV guest-star Dahlia Salem, and that the character's name is also Dahlia Salem). Later, in Part III, we see Reynolds and McCarthy as characters in that series, with Davis popping up in another vaguely antagonistic part.

Continue reading: The Nines Review

Infamous Review


OK
If the cogs of the movie-making machine are going to keep turning out the exact same movie, why do I have to write up a whole new review?

It's hard to keep an open mind when the synopsis - celebrated author Truman Capote heads to Kansas after a quadruple homicide rocks a rural town, where he becomes obsessed with one of the killers as he pens his book In Cold Blood - perfectly describes not only the new release Infamous, but last year's Capote just as well. To try to look at Infamous in a vacuum is disingenuous at best; no one who will see this movie has not at least heard of the other.

Continue reading: Infamous Review

Duma Review


Very Good
The phrase "man's best friend" couldn't be more accurate when it comes to me and my dog. Not only does he greet me at the door when I come home drunk, he also is quite effective at warding off the bratty neighborhood kids when they come close to my house. Nobody I know has this kind of kinship with their pet, but plenty of movies depict it with enough charm to convince me that everyone has this relationship. Of the recent films about the relationship between man and beast, Carroll Ballard's Duma has its head quite a bit above the rest.

In the wilds of Australia, a mother cheetah is mauled and eaten by two lions, leaving her three cubs to fend for themselves. One of these cubs is picked up by a young Australian boy, Xan (Alexander Michaletos), and his father, Peter (Cambell Scott). On their way home, father and son decide to keep the cub and raise it as their pet, giving him the name Duma. It is obvious that the father and son have a strong connection, and it's made especially clear when they arrive home and the mother (Hope Davis) is hardly seen. Well, little Duma grows up and gets too big for farm life, so Peter tells Xan that they will take Duma back where they found him. Tragically, Peter loses his long battle with cancer and dies right before the trip is to take place. Xan finds it hard to get used to his new city home and, needless to say, so does Duma. After a panic breaks out at his school, Xan decides he needs to take Duma home himself. They take Peter's motorbike and head out to find Duma's home, running into a lost tribesman and several kinds of wildlife on the way.

Continue reading: Duma Review

The Matador Review


Excellent
Pierce Brosnan's chances of returning to the James Bond role officially plunge down the drain the minute he sashays his Speedo-clad frame across the screen with Margarita in hand for all of Mexico to see. It's one of many surprises that await you in The Matador, an immensely entertaining jaunt that's still seeking an audience after turning heads at the 2005 Sundance Film Festival.

The plot sounds like the beginning of a bad joke: A hit man with some time to kill between jobs strikes up a meaningless conversation with a tourist sitting near him at a Mexico City hotel bar. The characters come from different walks of life, but manage to find a connection that we as an audience can invest in.

Continue reading: The Matador Review

The Secret Lives Of Dentists Review


Excellent
Can vomit be nominated Best Supporting Actor? Best Supporting Actress? Is puke gendered? Regardless, the stuff plays an essential role in The Secret Lives of Dentists. David Hurst (Campbell Scott) is emotionally sick with paranoia about whether his wife and fellow dentist Dana (Hope Davis) is having an affair. And then, he's quite literally sick, laid low with a case of the flu that spreads to Dana and his three young daughters over the course of five wearying, nauseous days. The stress and fear that takes hold of David in that time makes for the best movie about marital strife this side of American Beauty. However much director Alan Rudolph budgeted for creamed corn, it was worth every penny.

Dentists (adapted from Jane Smiley's novel The Age of Grief) opens with a brisk, gorgeously rendered sequence where David spies Dana being caressed lovingly by an unknown gentleman before she takes the stage in a small-town production of the opera Nabucco. As Verdi blares, David's mind swims. We rush through their romance in grainy flashbacks: Falling in love in dental school, starting a practice together, raising three daughters, and buying a weekend cabin in upstate New York. Scott, who's an expert at roles where he plays the well-meaning victim of circumstance, is excellent here. Subtly, he captures the way that wronged, anti-social people speak: Speaking a bit too loud to Dana, you can feel him studying her for evidence of sin. His eyes - and the camera - study her legs and the hem of her skirt, wondering what her sexual needs might be.

Continue reading: The Secret Lives Of Dentists Review

The Weather Man Review


Excellent
The immediate forecast for Gore Verbinski's profound adult drama The Weather Man calls for intense downpours of self-loathing and perpetually overcast feelings of inadequacy. Luckily, that initial dreary period should give way to a bright and sunny future once positive word of mouth spreads on this intensely moving film.

The title refers to Dave Spritz (Nicolas Cage), chief weather forecaster for Chicago's most popular morning news program. Despite his high-profile position - and self-described light work week - life tends to maneuver against Spritz when he's away from the office. He's divorced, and all attempts to reconcile with his spouse (Hope Davis) are hitting dead ends. His listless and overweight daughter Shelly (Gemmenne de la Peña) earns a cruel nickname at school because her clothes are too tight. His son Mike (Nicholas Hoult) abuses marijuana, then fends off advances from his drug counselor, a sexual predator.

Continue reading: The Weather Man Review

Hearts In Atlantis Review


OK
The entire time I spent watching the latest Stephen King big-screen adaptation Hearts in Atlantis, I had this nagging feeling in the back of my mind that something was missing. All the key elements of a potentially great film were present -- authentic-looking 1960s Americana scenery, great acting by Anthony Hopkins and newcomer Anton Yelchin (Delivering Milo), an intriguing story line, and strong directing by Scott Hicks. And then, at the end of the film, it just hit me like a sap across the back of the neck.

One common recurring narrative in many of King's better-known novel-to-screen adaptations -- such as Stand by Me, The Green Mile, and The Shawshank Redemption -- incorporates an older gentleman recalling his youth or a life-changing incident of his life. Hearts in Atlantis follows this to a tee. After learning of a childhood friend's death, a middle-aged photographer Robert Garfield (David Morse) ventures back to his hometown for the funeral. Upon arrival, Robert recalls memories of youth and of one innocent, fateful summer when a mysterious man named Ted Brautigan (Hopkins) entered his life and changed it forever.

Continue reading: Hearts In Atlantis Review

About Schmidt Review


Weak
See Jack brood. See Jack rebelliously piss standing up (no, no frontal nudity). See Jack cry. Notice the use of the name "Jack" and not Schmidt because, no matter how much Jack Nicholson is supposed to be restrained from his normally boisterous persona, the amount of tightly shot footage in About Schmidt dedicated specifically to closely framing Jack's mug never lets you forget exactly who you are looking at. There should be plenty of available excerpt material for Oscar this year. It certainly doesn't help derail the notion of this being a vanity piece that none of the supporting characters get a chance to shine.

Not that Jack can't be remarkably and convincingly low-key. His roles in both of Sean Penn's directorial projects, The Crossing Guard and The Pledge, are some of the best and most understated work he's ever done. And having enjoyed Citizen Ruth and Election, it's surprising to find that writer/director Alexander Payne's latest attempt at satire falls short of impressing when it stars someone that is capable of delivering. Maybe a comparison of the type of respect Penn must demand versus a relative newcomer to Hollywood is in order.

Continue reading: About Schmidt Review

Arlington Road Review


Excellent
Thrillers can be really bad. When was the last time you saw a good thriller? It takes sound acting, a creative premise and most of all, suspense. Arlington Road, the new film starring Jeff Bridges and Tim Robbins, has a paranoia factor set in. There are many moments in this movie where I felt paranoid and creepy (and this was after I saw Eyes Wide Shut).

Jeff Bridges stars as Michael Faraday, and teacher at George Washington University who teaches a course on American Terrorism. Some people think that this was convenient given the plot of the film, but I think that it's a way of already instilling a sense of fear and uncertainty. In the first scene, Faraday rescues a young boy who had lit some fireworks and forgot to throw them. The boy is coincidentally the son of their neighbors, Oliver and Cheryl Lang (Tim Robbins and Joan Cusack, both extremely creepy and frightening). After some hunches about Oliver, Michael starts to do some investigating and what he turns up is not pretty.

Continue reading: Arlington Road Review

Joe Gould's Secret Review


Very Good
When Mel Brooks played the Louis XVI in The History of the World, Part I, he often commented, "It's good to be the King." Joe Gould, a voluntarily homeless man, thinks that it's good to be the Bum... and it shows.

Joe Gould spends his days in Greenwich Village, making notes on the subject of humanity. He is compiling an oral history of mankind, a series of transcripts of conversations and essays on the nature of man. He does this by writing at every opportunity in composition books and by mooching off of rich Beatniks during the 50s in New York City. Amongst his supporters: painter Alice Neel (Susan Sarandon), E.E. Cummings, gallery owner Vivian Marquie (Patricia Clarkson) and publishing executive Charlie Duell (Steve Martin). These supporters frequently allow Joe Gould to stay at their homes, as well as contribute small sums of money to the Joe Gould fund.

Continue reading: Joe Gould's Secret Review

Duma Review


Very Good
The phrase "man's best friend" couldn't be more accurate when it comes to me and my dog. Not only does he greet me at the door when I come home drunk, he also is quite effective at warding off the bratty neighborhood kids when they come close to my house. Nobody I know has this kind of kinship with their pet, but plenty of movies depict it with enough charm to convince me that everyone has this relationship. Of the recent films about the relationship between man and beast, Carroll Ballard's Duma has its head quite a bit above the rest.

In the wilds of Australia, a mother cheetah is mauled and eaten by two lions, leaving her three cubs to fend for themselves. One of these cubs is picked up by a young Australian boy, Xan (Alexander Michaletos), and his father, Peter (Cambell Scott). On their way home, father and son decide to keep the cub and raise it as their pet, giving him the name Duma. It is obvious that the father and son have a strong connection, and it's made especially clear when they arrive home and the mother (Hope Davis) is hardly seen. Well, little Duma grows up and gets too big for farm life, so Peter tells Xan that they will take Duma back where they found him. Tragically, Peter loses his long battle with cancer and dies right before the trip is to take place. Xan finds it hard to get used to his new city home and, needless to say, so does Duma. After a panic breaks out at his school, Xan decides he needs to take Duma home himself. They take Peter's motorbike and head out to find Duma's home, running into a lost tribesman and several kinds of wildlife on the way.

Continue reading: Duma Review

The Impostors Review


Very Good
A charming and funny farce, obviously the brainchild of Tucci on peyote (or something akin), The Impostors lacks the magic of a film like Big Night, but still makes you smile plenty. A host of indie regulars round out the cast, which features Platt and Tucci as hapless actors stranded on a cruise liner.

The Daytrippers Review


Very Good
Not a bad little romantic comedy, with the radiant Davis tracking down her wayward husband (Tucci) from Long Island to Manhattan.

Final Review


Excellent
Bill (Denis Leary) wakes up in an institution. He is told by his doctor, Ann (Hope Davis), that he is only there for observation. He can leave whenever he makes the decision to accept reality. He is gripped by delusional fantasies that he was frozen by some government agency and is awaiting a "final" lethal injection. He doesn't know what his crime was, but can't shake the notion that he won't live much longer.

As one session with Ann melds with the next, Bill begins to understand that his amnesia is interfering with the possibility of release. Still, this realization adds stress to his already warped mind, causing images between the past and present to collide. Watching him struggle through varying streams of previous faults, responsible Ann becomes compelled to bend rules in exchange for a quicker recovery.

Continue reading: Final Review

Next Stop Wonderland Review


Weak
Huh? Hope Davis and Alan Gelfant play two Boston mopers (one a nurse, one an aquarium worker) who just can't find their soulmates. Mom puts a personal ad in the paper for Davis, even(!). The ensuing comedy of errors ends up being a limp melodrama of cliches. The plot is straight out of Sliding Doors and 'Til There Was You, but Wonderland adds nothing to the will-they-meet? genre of romance filmmaking, and Davis wears way too much lipstick. Best reserved for late night insomnia attacks. This one will knock you right out.
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Hope Davis Movies

Wild Card Movie Review

Wild Card Movie Review

Jason Statham may be playing essentially the same character he always plays, but this noir-style...

Wild Card Trailer

Wild Card Trailer

Nick Wild (Jason Statham) is working as a Las Vegas bodyguard for hire, mainly due...

Disconnect Trailer

Disconnect Trailer

With the 21st century world revolving around the it, people are becoming gradually more and...

Real Steel Movie Review

Real Steel Movie Review

Undemanding audiences will love this rousing father-son tale of redemption set amid the cacophonous crashing...

Real Steel Trailer

Real Steel Trailer

Charlie Kenton is a former boxer who finds he's given a huge opportunity to make...

The Lodger Movie Review

The Lodger Movie Review

Marie Belloc Lowndes' 1913 novel, The Lodger, based on the grisly Jack the Ripper killings...

Synecdoche, New York Movie Review

Synecdoche, New York Movie Review

If it weren't for Charlie Kaufman, the phrase "famous screenwriter" would be an oxymoron. Kaufman...

Synecdoche, New York Trailer

Synecdoche, New York Trailer

Watch the trailer for Synecdoche, New YorkCharlie Kaufman's is best know for his wonderful script...

The Nines, Trailer Trailer

The Nines, Trailer Trailer

The Nines Trailer The Nines consists of three short films, each featuring the same actors...

The Nines Movie Review

The Nines Movie Review

In the opening moments of John August's The Nines, an actor (Ryan Reynolds) drinks, drives,...

The Hoax Movie Review

The Hoax Movie Review

Everybody loves a good con artist, a guy who can bluff his way into or...

Infamous Movie Review

Infamous Movie Review

If the cogs of the movie-making machine are going to keep turning out the exact...

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