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Holly Hunter - New York premiere of Warner Bros. Pictures' 'Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice' at Radio City Music Hall - Arrivals at Radio City Music Hall - New York, United States - Sunday 20th March 2016

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Holly Hunter

Holly Hunter - New York premiere of Warner Bros. Pictures' 'Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice' at Radio City Music Hall - Arrivals at Radio City Music Hall - New York, United States - Sunday 20th March 2016

Holly Hunter
Holly Hunter

Holly Hunter - New York premiere of Warner Bros. Pictures' 'Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice' at Radio City Music Hall - Arrivals at Radio City Music Hall - New York, United States - Sunday 20th March 2016

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Holly Hunter
Holly Hunter

Holly Hunter - NY Premiere of Batman vs Superman Dawn of Justice at Radio City Music Hall - New York, New York, United States - Monday 21st March 2016

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Holly Hunter - The 2015 Vineyard Theatre Gala at the Edison Hotel Ballroom - Arrivals. at Edison Hotel Ballroom, - New York City, New York, United States - Monday 30th March 2015

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Holly Hunter

Holly Hunter - A variety of stars were photographed as they arrived for The New Group 20th Anniversary Gala which was held at the Tribeca Rooftop in New York City, New York, United States - Monday 9th March 2015

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Holly Hunter
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Holly Hunter - Opening night after party for the New Group production Rasheeda Speaking, held at the West Bank Cafe - Arrivals. at West Bank Cafe, - New York, New York, United States - Thursday 12th February 2015

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Holly Hunter

Bill Pullman, Scott Elliott, Holly Hunter, David Rabe, Morocco Omari, Raviv Ullman, Nadia Gan, Ben Schnetzer, Adam Bernstein and Richard Chamberlain - Opening night after party for The New Group production Sticks and Bones, held at the Out NYC hotel - Arrivals. at Out NYC hotel, - New York, New York, United States - Friday 7th November 2014

Bill Pullman, Scott Elliott, Holly Hunter, David Rabe, Morocco Omari, Raviv Ullman, Nadia Gan, Ben Schnetzer, Adam Bernstein and Richard Chamberlain
Bill Pullman
Bill Pullman, Scott Elliott, Holly Hunter, David Rabe, Morocco Omari, Raviv Ullman, Nadia Gan, Ben Schnetzer, Adam Bernstein and Richard Chamberlain

David Rabe, Raviv Ullman, Ben Schnetzer, Holly Hunter, Morocco Omari, Nadia Gan, Bill Pullman, Richard Chamberlain and Scott Elliott - The New 42nd street studios was the location for a meet and greet for the Tony award winning play Sticks and Bones in New York, New York, United States - Tuesday 30th September 2014

David Rabe, Raviv Ullman, Ben Schnetzer, Holly Hunter, Morocco Omari, Nadia Gan, Bill Pullman, Richard Chamberlain and Scott Elliott
David Rabe
David Rabe and Scott Elliott
David Rabe
David Rabe

Holly Hunter - The 20th Annual Screen Actors Guild Awards arrivals - Los Angeles, California, United States - Sunday 19th January 2014

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Holly Hunter - The 20th Annual Screen Actors Guild (SAG) Awards held at The Shrine Auditorium - Arrivals - Los Angeles, California, United States - Saturday 18th January 2014

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Holly Hunter - Opening night after party for the New Group production of The Jacksonian held at KTCHN restaurant - Arrivals - New York, New York, United States - Friday 8th November 2013

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Holly Hunter - 2013 Crystal + Lucy Awards held at The Beverly Hilton Hotel - Los Angeles, CA, United States - Wednesday 12th June 2013

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Holly Hunter - 2013 Crystal + Lucy Awards held at The Beverly Hilton Hotel - Los Angeles, CA, United States - Thursday 13th June 2013

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Holly Hunter

Holly Hunter - Women In Film's 2013 Crystal + Lucy Awards at The Beverly Hilton Hotel - Los Angeles, California, United States - Wednesday 12th June 2013

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Holly Hunter

Holly Hunter - Gordon MacDonald and Holly Hunter New York City, USA - A variety of stars attended the Opening night of play, originally written by British playwright Alan Ayckbourn 'Relatively Speaking' which was held at the Brooks Atkinson Theatre. Thursday 20th October 2011

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Holly Hunter

Holly Hunter Monday 28th March 2011 Screening of 'Meek's Cutoff' at the Landmark Sunshine Cinema - Arrivals New York City, USA

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Holly Hunter

Holly Hunter - Holly Hunter, New York City, USA - New York Premiere of 'True Grit' at the Clearview Cinemas Ziegfeld Tuesday 14th December 2010

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Holly Hunter

Holly Hunter Monday 27th September 2010 attends the 2010-11 season opening night performance of 'Das Rheingold' at The Metropolitan Opera House New York City, USA

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Holly Hunter - Saturday 23rd January 2010 at Screen Actors Guild Los Angeles, California

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Home For The Holidays Review


Very Good
Well, if it isn't Holly Hunter...again! Her second starring role in a week, Home for the Holidays shows us the comic, sensitive side of Hunter rather than her brooding, somber side from Copycat. As is typical of anything Hunter touches, both pictures have turned out quite well.

Directed by Jodie Foster, Home for the Holidays follows a couple of days in the life of Claudia (Hunter), a starving artist/museum employee whose life goes from bad to worse over the course of Thanksgiving "vacation." Losing her job is only the tip of the iceberg. When she jets home to spend a little time with Mom (Anne Bancroft) and Dad (Charles Durning), the Titanic of her life begins to sink. Enter maniacal brother Tommy (Robert Downey Jr) and eccentric Aunt Glady (Geraldine Chaplin), plus a host of other extended family members, and the result is the most hilarious Thanksgiving dinner you're likely ever to witness.

Continue reading: Home For The Holidays Review

Jesus' Son Review


Extraordinary
It's a typical day in the life of rambling junkie F*ckhead, whom we'll call FH for the purposes of this review. He just broke up with his on-again, off-again heroin buddy and girlfriend, Michelle, stole a car, drove to the local bar and is getting wasted with his buddy, Wayne, a burned out husk of a human being and card carrying member of the Undead Drunks Club.

After several shots of rotgut to wash down the uppers, downers and endless fuel of smack, bleary eyed Wayne asks FH if he wants to make a couple bucks to pay for the drinks they're gonna have later (we realize it's only mid-afternoon by this point.) They meander off to a nearby house and proceed to rip the copper wiring out of the walls. "Yep," Wayne chuckles. "This ought to be worth forty bucks - enough to get drunk tonight. Heh heh."

Continue reading: Jesus' Son Review

Living Out Loud Review


OK
Okay, I can sorta see what they were thinking. Holly Hunter stars as a free spirit who finds herself in the throes of divorce and in search of herself. En route to self, she encounters a plucky yet somewhat dense elevator attendant (DeVito) and a no-hit jazz club diva (Latifah) -- each of whom shares a thing or two about living. You know: out loud. Long-time screenwriter LaGravenese tries his hand at directing with fair aplomb, but ultimately, it's the story that stinks, as Hunter's journey toward self-realization never seemes to get very far.

Nine Lives Review


Weak
A well-cast compilation film suffocating on its own self-importance, Nine Lives aims to tie together nine vastly different stories, but ends up telling hardly any of them well. The conceit of writer/director Rodrigo Garcia is to take nine vignettes, each centered around a different woman (usually in desperate circumstances), and give us a brief glimpse into her life before cutting away to the next one, while stringing a few connecting threads between them all. To ensure that he's not playing favorites, each piece is done in one single Steadicam shot and kept to only nine or ten minutes in length. A minor character from one vignette becomes a major player later on, or vice versa. As in literature, anthology works like this are a hit-and-miss affair, and in this case the misses far outnumber the ones that connect.

Nine Lives opens strong on Sandra (Elpidia Carrillo), an imprisoned mother. Mopping up a floor, she's threatened by fellow prisoners, and harassed by a guard (Miguel Sandoval) who's convinced she can give him information. Everyone tells Sandra she's not going to make it, but you think she just might be able to, hunkering down turtle-like and just plowing through the rest of her sentence. But then her daughter visits, and the phone doesn't work, sending Sandra into a stunning explosion of rage, like a mother bear kept from her cub. It's a short, unrelentingly powerful story, and done by itself it would stand as a sublime little tragedy. The same goes for the final piece, in which Glenn Close and Dakota Fanning (hardly a better match could be imagined) visit a cemetery and talk with sublime ease about not much at all. But then comes the rest of the film in between.

Continue reading: Nine Lives Review

Raising Arizona Review


Extraordinary
It's said that two-thirds of Americans don't even bother to get a passport. While foreigners and Ivy Leaguers snicker over this as evidence of Americans' incuriosity about the world, I've always suspected that something else is at work. Even in an age when the whole country listens to the same radio stations, what makes America special is the spectacular and enduring diversity within its borders.

The Coen brothers, Joel and Ethan, get this. Like celluloid Micheners, their impressive body of work reaches deep into American settings, from post-war Hollywood to '50s New York, from late '80s Minnesota to early '90s Santa Monica. But it really hit its stride in Arizona.

Continue reading: Raising Arizona Review

Moonlight Mile Review


OK
Warning: This review is tainted by the author's prejudices against Moonlight Mile director Brad Silberling. In 1998, Mr. Silberling took it upon himself to remake Wim Wenders' metaphysical masterpiece Wings of Desire as the anemic Meg Ryan vehicle City of Angels. The quality of Mr. Silberling's film did not compensate for the audacity of the idea, and this critic forever placed a mark of dishonor on the director. This is worth mentioning in light of the discussion of Moonlight Mile that is to follow.

With that said, Moonlight Mile is only half bad. Sure, it's weepy and sentimental and fails to take full advantage of an emotionally fertile premise. But as a story of loss, self-discovery and rebirth it succeeds as much as it fails. If this were baseball, Moonlight Mile would be batting .500, which is good. But this is the movies, so half bad means two and a half stars.

Continue reading: Moonlight Mile Review

O Brother, Where Art Thou? Review


Excellent
Maverick movie directors eventually become domesticated. Don't believe me? The same guy who directed The Conversation also directed Jack. The man behind The French Connection helmed Blue Chips.

Whether it's through common sense, clean living, or skill, Joel and Ethan Coen have avoided a creative snag. After some 20 years, their movies are still original, intelligent. and funny without being aloof. Their latest effort, O Brother, Where Art Thou?, is no exception. Based on Homer's epic, The Odyssey, and set in Depression-era Mississippi, the brothers have done the unthinkable: They've taken classic literature and made it fun.

Continue reading: O Brother, Where Art Thou? Review

Broadcast News Review


Very Good
Rather dated now, this acclaimed tragicomedy about the network news sheds a little light on how the news gets made -- namely about how pretty boy anchormen are fed everything they say -- but its romance falls on the flat side. Holly Hunter (hard-boiled producer) and William Hurt (aforementioned pretty boy) are just too mismatched to make for a believable pair, and quirky Albert Brooks (geeky reporter) would never in a million years be allowed on the air. It's absurd but often funny, usually when it's dissecting the TV trade.

Searching For Debra Winger Review


Good
It's either sad or interesting or -- something -- when the only man in a movie is Roger Ebert. Rosanna Arquette, tired of hearing that old aphorism that there are no good parts for women in Hollywood, takes up a video camera and records interviews with some three dozen actresses at various ages. (The title invokes Debra Winger's recent retirement and reclusiveness -- though since this film she returned to the cinema.)

Continue reading: Searching For Debra Winger Review

The Piano Review


Essential
"We can't leave the piano!" Anna Paquin's precociousness and grating voice may have turned a lot of people away from The Piano, but her Oscar a few months later redeemed her somewhat. Paquin has since grown up, but her debut film is unforgettable: The haunting tragedy-with-happy-ending of an 1800s-era mute woman essentially exiled to New Zealand with her emotionally dead husband. Jane Campion does her best directing ever, working a miracle out of the bizarre Harvey Keitel, with whom Holly Hunter's Ada falls in love. Forbidden romance on a deserted, cold, and rainy island? Sign me up.

The Firm Review


Good
Run, Tom, run! Mr. Cruise got a workout in this picture, a film that had him on the run from the evil law firm that employed him and whose clients consist only of mobsters, killers, and other crooks. An all-star cast otherwise makes up for a largely uninspired, overly complex, and far too long movie that nonetheless maintains audience interest throughout a 2.5+ hour runtime. Holly Hunter is particularly good as a slutty private eye's assistant -- in fact, she was nominated for an Oscar for the cheeseball role. Hal Holbrook also earns high marks as an appropriately evil and mysterious bossman.

Moonlight Mile Review


Good

Finding warmth, humor and uneasy comfort in the face of senseless tragedy, "Moonlight Mile" is a poignant movie about pain and loss that doesn't succumb to melodrama and cry-you-a-river, give-me-an-Oscar performances.

Described as "emotionally autobiographical" by writer-director Brad Silberling ("City of Angels") -- whose actress girlfriend was killed by a stalker in 1989 -- the film is about the apprehensive bond that forms between a young man and the parents of his fiancée, who is murdered in a diner just a few weeks before their wedding.

The story, which takes place in 1970s New England (gratuitous soundtrack warning), opens the morning of the funeral as fresh-from-college Joe Nast (Jake Gyllenhaal) wakes up in the childhood bedroom of his late bride-to-be and begins packing his suitcase. He's planned to leave that night, although he's not sure where he's going. But after the service, he spends the evening with her downhearted, acquiescent and ironic parents (Dustin Hoffman and Susan Sarandon), who have resolved simply to go on with life as planned -- just as soon as Sarandon, fed up with a day of public grieving, tosses into the fireplace all the silly self-help books ("These Things Happen," "Grieving for Grown-Ups") given to them by concerned friends trying awkwardly to help.

Continue reading: Moonlight Mile Review

O Brother, Where Art Thou? Review


Excellent

Take Ulysses from Homer's "Odyssey," turn him into a dusty but peculiarly dapper hillbilly escaped from a Mississippi chain gang, circa 1937, and whaddya got? Only the funniest, most inspired movie of Coen Brothers illustrious comedy careers.

Taking screwball cues from Depression Era Hollywood and usurping their title from the "message movie" Joel McCrea's frustrated director wanted to make in 1941's satire "Sullivan's Travels," this picture's writers-directors Ethan and Joel Coen cook up a masterpiece of a scruffy romp about a no-class fugitive trying to get home to his wife before she re-marries to a colorless, straw-hatted dandy who holds more promise as a provider.

And who did the Coens get to play their uncouth Cajun hero, Ulysses "Everett" McGill? Why if it isn't George Clooney in a perfectly jaunty performance that seems to channel both the roguish comedic charm of Clark Gable in "It Happened One Night" and the earnest zaniness of Cary Grant in his screwiest comedies.

Continue reading: O Brother, Where Art Thou? Review

Thirteen Review


Very Good

A frank and unnerving depiction of the peer-pressure slippery slope scaled by kids hungry for cool cache in the callous caste system of teenage social politics, "Thirteen" is a movie that rings startlingly true, thanks in no small part to co-writer Nikki Reed -- currently 15 years of age -- whose own experiences in a Los Angeles junior high served as fodder for the plot.

Told largely from the amorphous perspective of 7th grader Tracy (the compellingly natural, pubescently lovely Evan Rachel Wood), the film is a grippingly reckless joyride through impetuous shoplifting, impulsive piercings, improvised inebriation and rushed sexuality by a promising, once-ingenuous young girl who has yet to form a real sense of self.

Dying to buddy up to Evie, her school's early-blooming queen bad-girl who is lusted after by all the boys (and played by the prematurely sultry Reed herself), Tracy progressively throws caution, schoolwork, self-respect, loyalty, a close bond with her mother (Holly Hunter) and all her misgivings to the wind. A blank slate eager to be drawn upon, she falls deeply under the influence of this girl whose lifestyle of borderline depravity is itself a precarious experiment in ego-fulfillment and a byproduct of an unhinged upbringing.

Continue reading: Thirteen Review

Jesus' Son Review


OK

Another scruffy, festival circuit flick about lovable, good-looking junkies, "Jesus' Son" gets by on a pair of commendably manic performances from rising stars Billy Crudup and Samantha Morton, but otherwise plots a rambling pre-destined course through blissful and heinous heroin binges, petty larceny and overdose deaths on its way to a stupor-emerging, halcyon rehab finale.

The versatile Crudup ("Waking the Dead," "The Hi-Lo Country") gives good druggie voice-over as an aimless '70s loser known only as F***head (or FH for short), who becomes addicted to H after falling for a beautiful, bedraggled user played by Morton (who was so brilliant as Sean Penn's mute, doormat girlfriend in "Sweet and Lowdown").

Between bloodshot romance, lost souls sex and fiery arguments, they carry each other toward their next fix, just trying to "feel alive."

Continue reading: Jesus' Son Review

Time Code Review


Good

Perhaps the most extraordinary experimental film ever unleashed outside the confines of the art house circuit, "Time Code" is a confident and daring attempt by director Mike Figgis ("Leaving Las Vegas," "The Loss of Sexual Innocence") to plant his flag on the barely-explored shores of 21st Century filmmaking.

Shooting on hand-held digital video in four continuous takes all running at once, Figgis splits the screen in quadrants like a security camera monitor and fiddles with the audio to draw your eye where he wants it. Then like an orchestral conductor, he unspools a precisely synchronized 93 minutes of raw, unedited, real-time footage, tracking multiple, largely-improvised narratives about a sampling of misanthropic, self-absorbed Hollywood denizens.

Packed with talented, name stars starving for something original to chew on, "Time Code's" has several stories -- some tense and emotional, others cynical and facetious -- unfolding simultaneously and often crossing paths.

Continue reading: Time Code Review

Little Black Book Review


Good

On its surface, "Little Black Book" looks like an tritely pedestrian, gimmick-driven chick flick about an emotionally mixed-up career gal who gets more than she bargained for when she rifles through her boyfriend's Palm Pilot looking up old girlfriends.

So imagine my surprise at being thoroughly entertained by this weightless but canny comedy blessed with characters whose personalities aren't dependant upon plot devices, with snappy, spontaneous dialogue (even witty internal-monologue narration), with a story that flows organically, and with a very human heroine who (gasp!) isn't always likable.

Brittany Murphy plays a sweetly self-conscious aspiring TV journalist -- trapped in an associate producer job at a trashy TV talk show -- who is goaded into nagging doubts about her adoring boyfriend by tittle-tattling coworkers (especially the charismatically tart Holly Hunter) who have been warped into habitual scandal-mongers by years of wrangling prostitute grandmothers and midget Ku Klux Klansmen for a living. (Kathy Bates has a ball as the show's shameless, tyrannical host.)

Continue reading: Little Black Book Review

Holly Hunter

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Holly Hunter

Date of birth

20th March, 1958

Occupation

Actor

Sex

Female

Height

1.57


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Holly Hunter Movies

Incredibles 2 Trailer

Incredibles 2 Trailer

Following events in 'The Incredibles' whereby the Parr family defeated the supervillain Syndrome and his...

The Big Sick Movie Review

The Big Sick Movie Review

It may be rather long for a romantic comedy, but this film has such a...

The Big Sick Trailer

The Big Sick Trailer

When Kumail and Emily meet, they're instantly drawn toward one another. Emily is a student...

Song To Song Trailer

Song To Song Trailer

The music scene of Austin, Texas becomes tainted by lust and illict desires as two...

Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice Movie Review

Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice Movie Review

After 2013's beefy Man of Steel, director Zack Snyder goes even bigger and darker with...

Batman V Superman: Dawn Of Justice Trailer

Batman V Superman: Dawn Of Justice Trailer

Every superhero has a dark side and being 100% human, Batman is in doubt over...

Batman V Superman: Dawn Of Justice - Official Trailer

Batman V Superman: Dawn Of Justice - Official Trailer

What happens when two superheroes with vastly differing opinions come head to head? Well, not...

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Manglehorn Trailer

Manglehorn Trailer

To most that see him, Manglehorn isn't exactly an enigma, he's a quiet man who...

Batman V Superman: Dawn Of Justice - Comic Con Trailer

Batman V Superman: Dawn Of Justice - Comic Con Trailer

Clark Kent is a reporter for the Daily Planet in his everyday life, but a...

Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice - Teaser Trailer

Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice - Teaser Trailer

When an alien lifeform crashed to Earth decades ago, no one noticed. When his own...

Paradise Trailer

Paradise Trailer

Lamb Mannerheim was a beautiful, smart, strictly religious, perfect young girl and the pride of...

Won't Back Down Trailer

Won't Back Down Trailer

An underprivileged mother (Gyllenhaal) determined to do the best for her child, takes action on...

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