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'Vous N'avez Encore Rien Vu' (You Ain't Seen Nothin Yet) Premiere During The 65th Cannes Film Festival

Lambert Wilson, Anne Consigny, Hippolyte Girardot and Cannes Film Festival - Anne Duperey, Pierre Arditi, Sabine Azema, Lambert Wilson, Anne Consigny, Hippolyte Girardot Monday 21st May 2012 'Vous N'avez Encore Rien Vu' (You ain't seen nothin yet) premiere during the 65th Cannes Film Festival

Lambert Wilson, Anne Consigny, Hippolyte Girardot and Cannes Film Festival
Lambert Wilson, Anne Consigny, Hippolyte Girardot and Cannes Film Festival
Alain Resnais, Anne Consigny, Hippolyte Girardot, Lambert Wilson and Cannes Film Festival

A Christmas Tale Review


Extraordinary
French director Arnaud Desplechin returns to the U.S. three years after his last domestically distributed picture, Kings & Queen, bearing a gift of another sort in A Christmas Tale. Seeing release approximately a month before the titular holiday, like some Black Friday extravaganza, Desplechin packs all manner of cinematic devices, narrative theatrics, and filmic vernacular into this work of unimaginable generosity.

Only a few days before the sugar plums and wassail are set on the table, Junon Vuillard (Catherine Deneuve), the grand matriarch of a family of lunatics, is diagnosed with a serious case of lymphoma, the same disease that already claimed her eldest son Joseph. The film opens with her husband Abel (Jean-Paul Roussillon) mourning over his son with a startlingly breezy candor. Employing shadow puppets, the lineage of the Vuillard family in its current incarnation is explained, leading to Ivan (Melvil Poupad), the youngest of Junon's children.

Continue reading: A Christmas Tale Review

Flight Of The Red Balloon Review


Extraordinary
Paris (and France in general) tends to be a habitat seen in big sweeps and large outside shots, attesting to the ongoing American romanticizing of the City of Light. The Eiffel Tower looming large in the background, the stoic Arc de Triomphe, the rolling lawns in front of the Basilique du Sacre Coeur: However intimate the city's candor might be, film has always taken Paris in with its monuments, landmarks, and open spaces as pieces of a collective familiarity.

With the exception of a lone, beautiful coda within the Musee d'Orsay, the very body responsible for the film's funding, Hou Hsiao-hsien's gorgeous Flight of the Red Balloon drifts away from these environs, making a film about Paris life that seems uninterested in Paris as a city. Based on, or perhaps just familiarized with, Albert Lamorisse's French children's classic The Red Balloon, Hsiao-hsien moves the focus from a child and his balloon to a child, his frazzled mom, and his new Chinese nanny, a young filmmaker on a student visa.

Continue reading: Flight Of The Red Balloon Review

House Of 9 Review


Weak
A bunch of strangers, trapped in a house, trying to escape, and only one can survive? Why that's the most original idea of all time!!!

House of 9 is yet another strangers-kill-one-another-while-trying-to-escape-a-house movie, this one with the premise that the survivor gets $5 million. There's no explanation for why these nine people are here or really much of who they are (though one's a cop, one's a rapper, one's an alcoholic, one's Kelly Brook, and one's Dennis Hopper playing a priest). And naturally, unless you like to hear Hopper attempt an Irish accent, there's not much reason to care about which one of them survives. The film is so obtuse (after about 30 minutes attempting to escape, the abductees are found hosting a dance party and then tucking in to sleep) you couldn't muster an emotion over these idiots if you tried.

Continue reading: House Of 9 Review

Manon Of The Spring Review


Excellent
In the sequel to Jean de Florette, we find the tables turned on Ugolin and Papet as young Manon (now played by the lovely Emmanuelle Béart) has grown up, though she's slightly deranged and lives in the hills as a vagabond shepherdess. (Of course, she's a vagabond shepherdess that is very attentive to shaving her body hair and studiously applying makeup.)

Manon carries with her the knowledge that Ugolin and Papet indirectly killed her father by sealing off his spring, so when she discovers the mountainous source of the spring -- and the water for the nearby town -- she returns the favor in kind. Alas, poor Ugolin finds himself falling in love with the wispy wanderer, leaving him dying both from thirst and a broken heart.

Continue reading: Manon Of The Spring Review

Kings & Queen Review


Extraordinary
Sometimes it's nice to be small. We can all suck up and lick our lips at multi-narrative wonders like Short Cuts, Magnolia, and Sunshine State, but there is something to be said for simplicity in story and complexity in character. Arnaud Desplechin's Kings & Queen has the grandeur of P.T. Anderson and Robert Altman, but has the loose charm and intoxicating spontaneity of Truffaut and Godard.

We start out looking at Nora (Emmanuelle Devos), being interviewed by someone. She talks about her OK life with nonchalance and a nervous smile. Her job as a gallery owner seems boring, but financially substantial enough to allow for her to go visit her cancer-ridden father (Maurice Garrel) and try to pawn off her 10-year-old child, Elias (Valentin Lelong), on Ismael (Mathieu Amalric), her second husband and Elias' main father figure besides Nora's own father.

Continue reading: Kings & Queen Review

Manon Of The Spring Review


Excellent
In the sequel to Jean de Florette, we find the tables turned on Ugolin and Papet as young Manon (now played by the lovely Emmanuelle Béart) has grown up, though she's slightly deranged and lives in the hills as a vagabond shepherdess. (Of course, she's a vagabond shepherdess that is very attentive to shaving her body hair and studiously applying makeup.)

Manon carries with her the knowledge that Ugolin and Papet indirectly killed her father by sealing off his spring, so when she discovers the mountainous source of the spring -- and the water for the nearby town -- she returns the favor in kind. Alas, poor Ugolin finds himself falling in love with the wispy wanderer, leaving him dying both from thirst and a broken heart.

Continue reading: Manon Of The Spring Review

Modigliani Review


OK
Despite great talent, fame and fortune eluded the Italian artist Amedeo Modigliani during his brief life. A drunkard and a drug addict, Modigliani lived in squalor and died a relatively obscure figure of the Paris art scene of the early 20th century. Now, more than 80 years after his death, with a single one of his portraits recently fetching $8 million, Modigliani has finally achieved the ne plus ultra of artistic success: He is the subject of a feature film, writer-director Mick Davis's aptly titled Modigliani.

After a brief prelude, the film picks up Modigliani's story in 1919, the year before his death, at a time when modern art was flourishing in Paris. Artists such as Pablo Picasso, Diego Rivera, and Jean Cocteau haunted the cafes at night as their fame and influence spread over the globe. It is here, in a café, where Modigliani (Andy Garcia) makes his entrance, drunkenly hopping onto a table and publicly ridiculing Picasso with the question, "How do you make love to a cube?"

Continue reading: Modigliani Review

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Hippolyte Girardot Movies

A Christmas Tale Movie Review

A Christmas Tale Movie Review

French director Arnaud Desplechin returns to the U.S. three years after his last domestically distributed...

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