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Charlotte's Web (1973) Review


Excellent
That's soooooooooooooooome pig!

Long before there was Babe, and long before The Lion King crooned about "The Circle of Life," Charlotte's Web taught every child about life, friendship, and death -- all courtesy of a talking pig and his spider friend, Charlotte.

Continue reading: Charlotte's Web (1973) Review

Color Of A Brisk And Leaping Day Review


Terrible
The color of a brisk and leaping day, it seems, is black and white.

The rather pompously titled Color of a Brisk and Leaping Day tells the story of John Lee, the grandson of a Chinese Immigrant who worked on the transcontinental railroad in the 1860s. For some reason, John becomes obsessed with the local, short-line Yosemite Valley Railroad, which is near closure due to abandonment. He manages to buy the railroad and tries (with the aid of minor characters played by Michael Stipe, who would probably have been more helpful playing a rock star instead of a traffic manager, and Henry Gibson). There's a romance, and there's hardship as John runs the railroad... runs it back into the ground, I should say.

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Nashville Review


Weak
Call me a heathen. I don't like Nashville.

Possibly the most celebrated film of the 1970s -- at least among film snob circles -- Robert Altman's sprawling case study of five days in the Tennessee city is self-absorbed, overwrought, and dismissive. Nor is it particularly well-made, with poor sound (even after being remastered for its DVD release) and washed-out photography, not to mention a running time (2:40) that's at least an hour too long.

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Charlotte's Web Review


Excellent
That's soooooooooooooooome pig!

Long before there was Babe, and long before The Lion King crooned about "The Circle of Life," Charlotte's Web taught every child about life, friendship, and death -- all courtesy of a talking pig and his spider friend, Charlotte.

Continue reading: Charlotte's Web Review

The Long Goodbye Review


OK
Robert Altman took a Raymond Chandler/Philip Marlowe novel -- God knows why -- and cast Elliot Gould as a private eye investigating a friend's death in the colorful 1970s, a far cry from the noirs of Bogie's Marlowe. It ends up with mixed results -- Marlowe is drawn as a goofy daydreamer (Altman calls him Rip Van Marlowe) and his story only gets interesting when Sterling Hayden, channeling Hemingway, goes bananas.

The Blues Brothers Review


Essential
The Blues Brothers has been re-released on DVD for its 25th anniversary. You've probably seen it countless times between its 1980 release and repeat airings on TV, so you know the basics. Still, here are 25 reminders why you have to see it again.

1) The music is great, coming from a legendary line-up of soul and blues artists: James Brown, Aretha Franklin, John Lee Hooker, Cab Calloway, and Ray Charles, whose performance of "Shake a Tail Feather" will get you dancing with the horde of extras onscreen.

Continue reading: The Blues Brothers Review

Henry Gibson

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