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Jane Fonda Is “Film Royalty” With AFI Lifetime Achievement Award


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Oscar-winning Hollywood actress Jane Fonda will be honoured with the American Film Institute's Lifetime Achievement Award, recognising her contribution to film in a career that has spanned six decades. The 75 year-old actress will presented with her award at a gala ceremony in Los Angeles next year, reports BBC News.

Jane Fonda
Jane Fonda Honoured For Her Long & Illustrious Career.

Her latest award will see the actress and fitness guru follow in the footsteps of her late father, Henry Fonda, who was presented with the same AFI highest honour in 1978. The pair will be the first father and daughter to enjoy the unique accolade.

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The 2010 'Ultimate Slam PaddleJam' Celebrity Ping Pong Tournament held at The Music Box Henry Fonda Theatre

Harold Perrineau, Henry Fonda and The Music - Harold Perrineau and Brittany Perrineau Hollywood, California - The 2010 'Ultimate Slam PaddleJam' Celebrity Ping Pong Tournament held at The Music Box Henry Fonda Theatre Sunday 26th September 2010

Harold Perrineau, Henry Fonda and The Music

The 2010 'Ultimate Slam PaddleJam' Celebrity Ping Pong Tournament held at The Music Box Henry Fonda Theatre

The Music and Henry Fonda - Soo Yeon Lee Hollywood, California - The 2010 'Ultimate Slam PaddleJam' Celebrity Ping Pong Tournament held at The Music Box Henry Fonda Theatre Sunday 26th September 2010

The Music and Henry Fonda
The Music and Henry Fonda

12 Angry Men Review


Essential
Who would have thought that a movie which almost entirely takes place in one room, consists of 12 men who do nothing but talk -- and who don't even have names -- would be such a searing experience? 12 Angry Men is a classic, and an undisputed one at that, a film that is as inspiring as it is well-crafted behind the scenes.

The story is a simple one: 12 jurors are asked to decide the fate of a young man who is accused of killing his father. If guilty, he will be sentenced to the electric chair. Otherwise he goes free. The evidence is overwhelmingly against him: Two eyewitnesses, a murder weapon known to be bought by the killer, and an alibi that he couldn't remember during questioning. Open and shut, but one juror stands alone against the other 11, who'd like to get home in time for dinner. And with that single "not guilty" vote, Henry Fonda's Juror #8 sets off the titular anger.

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Drums Along The Mohawk Review


Excellent
For a beaten-down film critic as myself, the best thing about attending The New York Film Festival is not to get a jump on feature film releases that will quickly show up in local theaters a few days after their festival premieres, but to savor those obscure, febrile marvels of classic cinema that for whatever reasons (neglect, deterioration, ignorance) have been shuttled aside or locked away in film vaults to make way for the latest De Palma monstrosity, a fawning Las Vegas comic tribute documentary, or the most recent Sylvia Miles comeback film.

The New York Film Festival offered a double bill of savory morsels in this succulent vein, presided over master chef Martin Scorsese and his restoration outfit, The Film Foundation. On the bill-of-fare at The New York Film Festival were two 20th Century Fox three-strip Technicolor sweetmeats -- John Ford's Drums Along the Mohawk and John Stahl's Leave Her To Heaven.

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The Lady Eve Review


Excellent
It's just not even a fair fight, and fortunately writer/director Preston Sturges knows that. Barbara Stanwyck could have poor little Henry Fonda for breakfast, and in Sturges' blithely astringent comedy The Lady Eve, she does just that. Fonda, as hapless rich kid Charles Pike, puts up some resistance to Stanwyck, international card sharp and grifter extraordinaire Jean Harrington, but it's really no contest -- he knows he's doomed to be won over by her charms, as the audience is, and ultimately everyone is the happier for it.

Sturges wrote for women like few other screenwriters ever have, even in our supposedly more advanced times. His heroines have a welcome tendency towards toughness, clarity of mind, sharpened tongues, devastating wit, and the ability to wear smashing evening wear without looking the least bit fragile. The remarkable Stanwyck is a fantastic creation as Harrington, able to think (and speak) circles around everybody in any given room, but still retaining the heart to fall madly for nebbishy Pike.

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Fort Apache Review


Extraordinary
Fort Apache is a John Wayne vehicle often mentioned on the short list of best westerns (The Ox-Bow Incident, Shane, The Wild Bunch, The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance, and High Noon lead the posse). Typical of John Ford westerns, but more adventurous than most of them, Fort Apache offers Ford's trademark mix of solid entertainment, soap, occasional shoot-'em-ups, and reverie.

In this one, the Duke is a cavalry officer stationed in Apache territory who is sympathetic to the Indians' plight. He is forced to choose between challenging the Apaches and disobeying his commanding officer, a hapless Northeasterner (Henry Fonda). The straight-arrow role arguably fits Wayne better than the conflicted heroes and bad guys he played in The Searchers, Red River, and other films.

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Jezebel Review


OK
Jezebel's southern Civil War-era setting and its brazen female lead make it seem a lot like Gone With the Wind, but this Bette Davis Best Actress-winner can't hold a candle to the successor which would arrive the following year. Davis is the draw here, playing a bachelorette who no one seems to be able to control -- and she of course is keen to keep it that way. The histrionics come across as quaint today, and even Davis's performance can't hold the film up all by its lonesome.

The Cheyenne Social Club Review


Good
What to expect of a film titled The Cheyenne Social Club, starring Jimmy Stewart and directed by Gene Kelly? Certainly not a semi-comedy about a roughneck who inherits a whorehouse from his brother. This western oddity is a sort of feel-good rendition of Unforgiven, with less of a body count. When poor, yokelish Jimbo inherits the titular "social club," he's at a loss of what to do. Obviously working the skin trade is not quite his bag, and seeing a classic nice guy like Stewart handle this moral crisis is quite amusing, at least for a while. Ultimately the film is pretty fluffy, but it's not the worst western I've seen by far.

Fort Apache Review


Extraordinary
Fort Apache is a John Wayne vehicle often mentioned on the short list of best westerns (The Ox-Bow Incident, Shane, The Wild Bunch, The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance, and High Noon lead the posse). Typical of John Ford westerns, but more adventurous than most of them, Fort Apache offers Ford's trademark mix of solid entertainment, soap, occasional shoot-'em-ups, and reverie.

In this one, the Duke is a cavalry officer stationed in Apache territory who is sympathetic to the Indians' plight. He is forced to choose between challenging the Apaches and disobeying his commanding officer, a hapless Northeasterner (Henry Fonda). The straight-arrow role arguably fits Wayne better than the conflicted heroes and bad guys he played in The Searchers, Red River, and other films.

Continue reading: Fort Apache Review

Young Mr. Lincoln Review


Good
Considering the legacy of films left by the great John Ford (The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance, The Searchers, The Grapes of Wrath), it's a little strange that Criterion chose Young Mr. Lincoln as the first of his films to get the luxe treatment it typically provides. I'm willing to bet that most moviegoers -- even cinefiles -- haven't seen the film, and I'd wager that few have ever even heard of it.

Nonetheless, here we are, with a mid-career, highly fictionalized story about Abraham Lincoln's days as a kid with gumption and a desire to become a lawyer, despite never attending law school for the training. The first of the film gives us Lincoln (Henry Fonda, with the perfect haircut for the job) losing his first love and meeting Mary Todd, then starting up a bootstrap law practice where his primary means of settling disputes is the threat of kicking his clients in the rump.

Continue reading: Young Mr. Lincoln Review

Young Mr. Lincoln Review


Good
Considering the legacy of films left by the great John Ford (The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance, The Searchers, The Grapes of Wrath), it's a little strange that Criterion chose Young Mr. Lincoln as the first of his films to get the luxe treatment it typically provides. I'm willing to bet that most moviegoers -- even cinefiles -- haven't seen the film, and I'd wager that few have ever even heard of it.

Nonetheless, here we are, with a mid-career, highly fictionalized story about Abraham Lincoln's days as a kid with gumption and a desire to become a lawyer, despite never attending law school for the training. The first of the film gives us Lincoln (Henry Fonda, with the perfect haircut for the job) losing his first love and meeting Mary Todd, then starting up a bootstrap law practice where his primary means of settling disputes is the threat of kicking his clients in the rump.

Continue reading: Young Mr. Lincoln Review

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