Heino Ferch

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Goldene Kamera Awards 2015 - Arrvials

Heino Ferch and Marie Jeanette Ferch - Shots of a host of stars as they arrive for the annual German Goldene Kamera Awards 2015 which were held at Messehallen in Hamburg, Germany - Saturday 28th February 2015

Heino Ferch and Marie Jeanette Ferch

Goldene Kamera 2015

Marie-Jeanette Ferch and Heino Ferch - Shots of a host of stars as they arrive for the annual German Goldene Kamera Awards 2015 which were held at Messehallen in Hamburg, Germany - Friday 27th February 2015

Marie-Jeanette Ferch and Heino Ferch
Marie-Jeanette Ferch and Heino Ferch
Marie-Jeanette Ferch and Heino Ferch
Heino Ferch
Heino Ferch

World premiere of 'Bibi und Tina - Voll verhext'

Marie-Jeanette Ferch, daughter Ava and Heino Ferch - Photographs from the World premiere of 'Bibi und Tina - Voll verhext' which was held at the Zoo Palast movie theater in Berlin, Germany - Saturday 20th December 2014

Marie-Jeanette Ferch, daughter Ava and Heino Ferch
Marie-Jeanette Ferch, niece Magdalena, niece Philippa, daughter Ava and Heino Ferch
Marie-Jeanette Ferch, niece Magdalena, daughter Ava and Heino Ferch
Marie-Jeanette Ferch, niece Magdalena, daughter Ava and Heino Ferch

Mercedes Benz Fashion Week - Laurel - Arrivals and Front Row

Marie-Jeanette Ferch and Heino Ferch - Mercedes Benz Fashion Week Berlin Autumn/Winter 2014 at Fashion Tent at Brandenburg Gate (Brandenburger Tor) - Laurel - Arrivals and Front Row. - Berlin, Germany - Thursday 16th January 2014

Picture - Heino Ferch and Marie-Jeanette Ferch , Saturday 22nd September 2012

Heino Ferch, Ferch and Marie-Jeanette - Heino Ferch and Marie-Jeanette Ferch Saturday 22nd September 2012 attend the Oktoberfest beer festival at Hippodrom

The Tunnel Review


Weak
This 2001 production about East Germans fleeing to West Berlin focuses on one of many tunnel-building operations when the infamous wall was built in 1961, and centers on a famous athlete who defied his Communist oppressors. Dangers and triumphs make for considerable tension, while its overextended length at 150 minutes, due to it being written as a two-part series for German TV, riddles it with slow pacing, melodrama, and viewer fatigue. Which may explain its delay in achieving a theatrical release until 2005.

Harry Melchior (a very buff and credible Heino Ferch in a part based on the real-life Hasso Herschel), is an East German swimmer and a troublesome renegade in Communist-controlled Berlin--all the more so for winning the national swimming competition. But, as much as the authorities want to use his new celebrity for propagandistic purposes, he simply won't cooperate.

Continue reading: The Tunnel Review

The Tunnel Review


Weak
This 2001 production about East Germans fleeing to West Berlin focuses on one of many tunnel-building operations when the infamous wall was built in 1961, and centers on a famous athlete who defied his Communist oppressors. Dangers and triumphs make for considerable tension, while its overextended length at 150 minutes, due to it being written as a two-part series for German TV, riddles it with slow pacing, melodrama and viewer fatigue. Which may explain its delay in achieving a theatrical release until 2005.

Harry Melchior (a very buff and credible Heino Ferch in a part based on the real-life Hasso Herschel), is an East German swimmer and a troublesome renegade in Communist-controlled Berlin--all the more so for winning the national swimming competition. But, as much as the authorities want to use his new celebrity for propagandistic purposes, he simply won't cooperate.

Continue reading: The Tunnel Review

Lucie Aubrac Review


Grim
Thought a WWII movie couldn't be dead boring? Think again. Lucie Aubrac is the story of the French resistance member of the same name, a woman whose entire job during the war apparently consisted of busting her husband out of jail after repeatedly being caught for stupid offenses against the Nazis. Carole Bouquet as Lucie spends most of her screen time staring defiantly into the camera whilst wearing a stupid hat. Filled with minutaie about resistence members, dates, codes, and more than a little melodrama. Blame the French. I know I do.

Continue reading: Lucie Aubrac Review

Downfall Review


Weak
Is it possible to make a film about Hitler and his regime's final days without humanizing the Nazis? Oliver Hirschbiegel's Downfall (Der Untergang) proves to be a harrowing recreation of the Nazi elite's last stand trapped underground by the encroaching Red Army, but on the issue of depicting its notorious cast of characters - and the gangs all here, from Hitler and the Goebbells family to Himmler, Eva Braun, Albert Speer, and Hermann Fegelein - the film is unable to avoid sentimentalizing what is, for most of the modern world, a distinctly unsentimental moment in 20th century history. One can recognize the dramatic necessity of attempting to portray such monsters with more than a blunt brushstroke, and often, Hirschbiegel's impressively expansive drama (adapted by Bernd Eichinger from both Joachim Fest's Inside Hitler's Bunker and Traudl Junge and Melissa Müller's Until the Final Hour) eerily captures the hysterical, delusional fanaticism that gripped the Nazis - and Hitler in particular - up until the very end of April 1945. But if the sight of crying Nazis and "brave" SS soldiers is the price to be paid for such a riveting portrait, one must wonder if this well-intentioned enterprise - the first German-produced film to directly confront Hitler in nearly 50 years - doesn't sabotage its own portrait of the appalling empire's collapse.

After a brief prologue that finds Hitler (Bruno Ganz) choosing Traudl Junge (Alexandra Maria Lara) - the woman who would later become the subject of the 2002 documentary Blind Spot: Hitler's Secretary - as his secretary, Hirschbiegel's film whisks us away to 1945 Berlin, where der Fuhrer and company are vainly attempting to keep the Aryan dream alive from a concrete bunker deep underneath the battle-ravaged city. Hitler remains convinced, against overwhelming evidence to the contrary, that the war remains winnable, and Ganz - an actor whose strength is usually found in contemplative silence - superbly brings the horrific fascist to maniacal life, balancing an exhausted, stooped posture and twitching left hand (always held behind his back) with sudden delusional tirades of mouth-frothing madness. Surrounded by increasingly cynical military officers, an unrepentant Hitler is agitated, desperate, and unable to relinquish the belief that his Nazi army will re-mobilize for a final, fatal strike against the Russians. Meanwhile, absurd and surreal last-gasp mini-dramas play out throughout the bunker, from Junge and her fellow secretary's attempts to remain optimistic and Albert Speer (Heino Ferch) and Heinrich Himmler's (Ulrich Noethen) eventual desertions to, most chillingly, Magda (Corinna Harfouch) and Joseph Goebbels' (Ulrich Matthes) plans to exterminate their six children should National Socialism crumble.

Continue reading: Downfall Review

Wintersleepers Review


Good
Sweeping shots of snowcapped mountains, displayed against a thumping techno beat and cut in with introductory shots of various characters (complete with their names appearing on screen) packing up to go somewhere might give one the impression that Wintersleepers is about a heist. The momentum builds like wildfire in these opening sequences as the phrase 'Are you really leaving today' echoes throughout the various departures happening across the board. This momentum quickly dies, as does the hope for any bank robbing scenarios. What comes in its place is a much slower film which lumbers along (painstakingly at times) to a crisp, almost haunting close.

Tom Tykwer, the German director who exploded onto the international scene with Run Lola Run brings this odd story of mistaken identity and deathly fate to the screen with an awkward, but in some ways rewarding, slant.

Continue reading: Wintersleepers Review

Downfall Review


Weak

For those not already versed in the lore of Adolf Hitler'sfinal days, the intimacy, immediacy and bunker-mentality minutia of "Downfall"may make for truly engrossing cinema. A detailed, historically accurateaccount that bears witness as the psychotic dreams of a 1,000-year ThirdReich slip away from its increasingly paranoid Fuehrer, this bravely matter-of-factGerman epic features uniformly powerful performances and is an eerie, vividrealization of gray-walled claustrophobia and the terror of saturationbombing. (The camera shakes in a uniquely unsettling, knock-you-off-your-bearingsway with each mortar shell.)

The fantastic Bruno Ganz (best known in the US for "Wingsof Desire") plays Hitler with a broken kind of humanity that makeshis evil subtler than expected, but by extension all the more chilling.His senior staff is accounted for nearly every moment of the detailed film,but none of them stands out except Ulrich Matthes as psychotically loyalpropaganda minister Joseph Goebbels, and Corinna Harfouch as his wife.She has the film's most disturbing scene, poisoning her children to "save"them from growing up in a world without National Socialism.

But while director Oliver Hirschbiegel ("DasExperiment") very effectively takes youdeep inside Nazi Germany's crumbling heart and brings many infamous momentsacutely to life, his film doesn't offer much in the way of new insight.The script is more of a textbook play-by-play than an examination of impulsesand psyches, and while the Hirschbiegel and his cast add those dimensionsthrough their fine work, it seems the only way he could invest the audiencein these events was by seeking out a sympathetic minor character -- inthe person of Hitler's young secretary, Traudl Junge (Alexandra Maria Lara)-- and beef up her significance.

Continue reading: Downfall Review

Extreme Ops Review


Zero

I can't remember the last time I saw worse stunt editing or cheaper action movie production values than in "Extreme Ops," a virtually plotless snowboarders-vs.-terrorists waste of celluloid, so feeble in every way that its only entertainment value is in snickering at the characters' supposedly uber-hip hairstyles.

Cue-card-quality, glazed-eyed, 20-nothing actor Devon Sawa (who looks as if he's spent the two years since "Final Destination" eating donuts and smoking dope) sports a do that resembles dozens of shellacked, broken chopsticks glued to his head. Giggly Angeline Jolie look-alike Jana Pallaske is supposed to be some kind of rocker "grrrl" (her punk band intro scene is so badly dubbed you'd think she was in a Godzilla movie) but the extent of her street chick cred is a few streaks of blue in her hair.

Both play daredevil snowboarders/skiers hired by a TV commercial director (Rufus Sewell, "A Knight's Tale") to fly to Austria and outrun an avalanche for a camcorder advertisement. But when they arrive at their location -- a half-finished mountaintop resort -- they run afoul of generically scruffy Eastern European terrorists using the place as a hideout. Now they must extreme-board for their lives.

Continue reading: Extreme Ops Review

Winter Sleepers Review


Weak

Cashing in on the notoriety of German wunderkind Tom Tykwer's innovative, influential and brilliantly kinetic "Run Lola Run," a small American releasing house called Winstar Cinema has unleashed this week the director's shivery 1997 psychological roundelay entitled "Winter Sleepers."

The film tracks the subconscious domino effect of a terrible car accident on an icy mountain road that leaves a little girl hospitalized and on the verge of death.

Her destitute farmer father (Josef Bierbichler) becomes obsessed with identifying the drunken driver that collided with their car. All he remembers of the man -- who walked away after his auto flew off the road -- is that he had an frightful scar on the back of his head, partially hidden by his hair.

Continue reading: Winter Sleepers Review

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