Heather Langenkamp

Heather Langenkamp

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2014 FanExpo Canada

Robert Englund and Heather Langenkamp - 2014 FanExpo at Toronto Metro Convention Centre. - Toronto, Canada - Sunday 31st August 2014

Robert Englund
Robert Englund
Robert Englund
Robert Englund

A Nightmare On Elm Street Review


Grim
A Nightmare on Elm Street, and more notably Freddy Kruger, has a special place in the hearts of many Americans in their late 20s and early 30s. When the movie was released in 1984, these now older viewers were in elementary and middle school. The dark was a formidable threat, and a villain like Kruger was a concern that tapped at the corners of the mind.

Viewed through older eyes, Nightmare isn't remotely scary. I can see the nostalgic value of Freddy Kruger (played by Robert Englund, who has a built career on this role) the same way that I sometimes hum Debbie Gibson songs to myself. But as a first-time viewer, I found my attention caught by the lousy acting, hideously dated wardrobe, and actress Ronee Blakley's apparent bronzer addiction. She makes Jessica Simpson in The Dukes of Hazzard look like an albino.

Continue reading: A Nightmare On Elm Street Review

A Nightmare On Elm Street Review


Good
In 1984, A Nightmare on Elm Street revived the teen horror genre, later spawning six sequels about Freddy, the burn victim/child killer who kills you when you fall asleep. Who knew that the sheep were homages to Buñuel? Or that this was Johnny Depp's first movie? The DVD has a commentary track with Craven and the then-idolized Langenkamp, among others, to clear this all up for you.

Wes Craven's New Nightmare Review


Grim
In this unofficial seventh entry into the Nightmare on Elm Street series, Wes Craven takes us into one of the most bizarro horror setups ever put to film, as he reveals, yeah, those other six films were all just movies, but now it's for real. He's not kidding: Craven plays himself, as does Robert Englund... and Craven reveals that Freddy is some sort of half-spiritual evil (thus inspiring his screenplays), and now his intended victim is Heather Langenkamp (also playing herself), the star of the original Nightmare film. She's now a mom, and her creepy son has something to do with all of this, with a less-burned-up Freddy stalking the starlet from reality into some proto-sleepwalking-fantasy world. By the end, she's discovered the very script she's living, and, well, if any of this ends up making sense to you then you're a better man than I.

A Nightmare On Elm Street 3: Dream Warriors Review


OK
The Nightmare continues, with two newcomers who would turn out to be fairly big stars -- Patricia Arquette and "Larry" Fishburne (dig the beard!) -- plus appearances from two classic actors whose presence is always welcome -- Dick Cavett and Zsa Zsa Gabor. This time, Heather Langenkamp from Nightmare #1 is a counselor to troubled teens, and Freddie decides to try to get them to commit suicide, thus doing in his old nemesis and a bunch of rotten kids at the same time. Far better than Nightmare #2, this one has a serpentine Freddie vomiting up a half-eaten, perpetually screaming Arquette. Can you not love this?

Continue reading: A Nightmare On Elm Street 3: Dream Warriors Review

Boogeymen Review


OK
Just when you think there are no new ideas in Hollywood comes a DVD like Boogeymen, which shakes up your expectations of the movies. With the promise of giving you "the greatest hits of horror," Boogeymen is a compilation of scenes from 17 horror movies, ostensibly the best-known bits of the movies' "boogeymen" doing their dirtiest work.

Some of these boogeymen are the real deal -- Leatherface (The Texas Chainsaw Massacre) at the end of the film, Freddy Krueger (A Nightmare on Elm Street) in his finest hour, Jason (Friday the 13th) chasing a towel-wrapped co-ed, Pinhead (Hellraiser) ripping apart some dude. These are memorable horror baddies who haunted us during our youth. Then there are scenes from Wishmaster, Leprechaun, The Guardian, and even The Dentist -- not only is it not scary, it's silly and insulting to the other villains (like Psycho's Norman Bates) in the lineup. The Puppetmaster? And The Ugly? I've never even heard of The Ugly.

Continue reading: Boogeymen Review

Heather Langenkamp

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