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The Comedian - Clip & Trailer


Once, Jackie Burke was one of the biggest names in town; he was a comedian with his own show on a prime network and his life looked like he was set. Now, aging and working as a stand-up comic, Jackie wants to reinvent himself and forget about all the old jokes he used to tell and characters he used to play but that's far from what the bookers and audience members want - they wish to see the old Jackie Burke performing his known material.

One night Jackie takes to the stage and he can only take a certain amount of crowd heckling, fed up he lashes out at an audience member and as a result, the comedian is incarcerated and made to carry out a community service order.

Though Jackie had to serve a short sentence, the footage of Jackie hitting the heckler has made him an internet sensation and introduced a whole load of new fans to him.

Continue: The Comedian - Clip & Trailer

Harvey Keitel , Daphna Kastner - 2016 amfAR New York Gala - Red Carpet Arrivals - New York, New York, United States - Wednesday 10th February 2016

Harvey Keitel and Daphna Kastner

Michael Caine Talks About Working With Harvey Keitel In 'Youth'


Michael Caine Harvey Keitel

Ahead of the British release of his forthcoming movie Youth, Michael Caine has spoken exclusively to us about what it was like working with co-star Harvey Keitel on the set.

In the award-winning comedy-drama, Caine and Keitel star as two best friends in the twilight years of their life, reflecting on their memories and friendship while vacationing in the Swiss Alps. When asked what his co-star was like to get on with, Caine had high praise indeed.

Michael Caine Harvey Keitel Rachel WeiszMichael Caine with 'Youth' co-stars Harvey Keitel and Rachel Weisz at the red carpet premiere

Continue reading: Michael Caine Talks About Working With Harvey Keitel In 'Youth'

Sir Michael Caine Talks About Conducting An Orchestra In 'Youth'


Michael Caine Harvey Keitel

Sir Michael Caine has spoken about being taught how to conduct an orchestra as part of his role in forthcoming film Youth, which won two awards at the European Film Awards earlier in December.

82 year old Caine, who was recently voted by the British public as the country’s greatest living film actor, stars as composer Fred Ballinger alongside his best friend, played by Harvey Keitel. He was asked about his reaction to being asked to play the part of a classical music conductor, and his training for it.

Michael CaineSir Michael Caine at the 28th European Film Awards in December 2015

Continue reading: Sir Michael Caine Talks About Conducting An Orchestra In 'Youth'

Harvey Keitel - Premiere of Fox Searchlight Pictures' 'Youth' at DGA Theater at DGA Theater - Los Angeles, California, United States - Tuesday 17th November 2015

Harvey Keitel
Harvey Keitel
Harvey Keitel and Daphna Kastner
Harvey Keitel and Daphna Kastner
Harvey Keitel and Daphna Kastner
Harvey Keitel and Daphna Kastner

Harvey Keitel - BFI London Film Festival - 'Youth' - Premiere held at the Vue cinema - Arrivals - London, United Kingdom - Thursday 15th October 2015

Harvey Keitel
Rachel Weisz, Michael Caine and Harvey Keitel
Rachel Weisz, Michael Caine and Harvey Keitel
Rachel Weisz, Michael Caine and Harvey Keitel
Rachel Weisz, Michael Caine and Harvey Keitel
Rachel Weisz, Michael Caine and Harvey Keitel

Harvey Keitel - The BFI London Film Festival Premiere of 'Youth' held at the Vue West End - Arrivals at Vue West End - London, United Kingdom - Thursday 15th October 2015

Harvey Keitel
Sir Michael Caine, Rachel Weisz and Harvey Keitel
Sir Michael Caine, Rachel Weisz and Harvey Keitel
Sir Michael Caine, Rachel Weisz and Harvey Keitel
Sir Michael Caine, Rachel Weisz and Harvey Keitel
Sir Michael Caine, Rachel Weisz and Harvey Keitel

Harvey Keitel - BFI LFF: 'Youth' gala screening held at the VUE West End, arrivals. - London, United Kingdom - Thursday 15th October 2015

Harvey Keitel
Michael Caine, Rachel Weisz and Harvey Keitel
Michael Caine, Rachel Weisz and Harvey Keitel
Michael Caine, Rachel Weisz and Harvey Keitel
Michael Caine, Rachel Weisz and Harvey Keitel
Harvey Keitel

Harvey Keitel - 2015 Toronto International Film Festival (TIFF) - Celebrity Sightings at STORYS - Toronto, Canada - Sunday 13th September 2015

Harvey Keitel
Harvey Keitel

Harvey Keitel - 68th Cannes Film Festival - amfAR's Cinema Against Aids Gala at Hotel du Cap-Eden-Roc in Antibes at Cannes Film Festival - Cannes, France - Thursday 21st May 2015

Harvey Keitel
Roman Keitel, Harvey Keitel and Daphna Kastner

Harvey Keitel - A variety of stars were photographed at the 68th Annual Cannes Film Festival as they attended a photo call for 'Youth' in Cannes, France - Wednesday 20th May 2015

Harvey Keitel
Harvey Keitel
Harvey Keitel
Harvey Keitel

Harvey Keitel - A variety of stars were photographed as they arrived at the 2015 Tribeca Film Festival which was held at the State Supreme Courthouse in New York, United States - Tuesday 14th April 2015

Harvey Keitel
Harvey Keitel and Daphna Kastner
Harvey Keitel

Harvey Keitel - Photographs from the New York premiere of biographical drama 'Big Eyes' which stars Amy Adams, Christoph Waltz and is directed by Tim Burton. The premiere was held at the Museum of Modern Art in New York City, New York, United States - Tuesday 16th December 2014

Harvey Keitel

Harvey Keitel and Daphna Kastner - New York premiere of The Grand Budapest Hotel at the Alice Tully Hall - Outside Arrivals - New York City, New York, United States - Wednesday 26th February 2014

Harvey Keitel and Daphna Kastner
Harvey Keitel and Daphna Kastner

Daphna Kastner and Harvey Keitel - Daphna Kastner and Harvey Keitel Monday 4th June 2012 2012 Made In NY Awards at Gracie Mansion

Harvey Keitel and Tribeca Film Festival Tuesday 17th April 2012 2012 Tribeca Film Festival Vanity Fair party at the State Supreme Courthouse

Harvey Keitel and Tribeca Film Festival

Harvey Keitel Monday 16th April 2012 Tribeca Ball 2012 at New York Academy of Art

Harvey Keitel

Harvey Keitel - Harvey Keitel and Dapha Kastner Wednesday 27th April 2011 at Tribeca Film Festival New York City, USA

Harvey Keitel
Harvey Keitel

Little Fockers Review


Weak
While this second sequel to Meet the Parents features the same comedy of embarrassment and vulgarity as its predecessors, it also takes a strange sideways step into machismo that leaves it feeling rather joyless.

As their twins (Daisy Tahan and Colin Baiocchi) are about to turn 5, Greg and Pam Focker (Stiller and Polo) are planning a big birthday party involving both of their sets of parents. While Pam's intense dad Jack (De Niro) is pressuring Greg to be a family leader, her mom (Danner) tries to keep the peace.

Meanwhile, Greg's parents (Streisand and Hoffman) are on separate quests of their own. But it's Pam's ex Kevin (Wilson) who really stirs things up. As does a drug rep (Alba) who gets a bit too close to Greg.

Continue reading: Little Fockers Review

Meet The Parents Little Fockers Trailer


Our favourite dysfunctional family returns to the screens once again in Meet The Parents Little Fockers. It's 10 years on since Greg and Jack first met, and after finally marrying his daughter and raising two children with her, Jack seems to finally be accepting Greg for who he is; however it doesn't seem Jack's ever going to be 100% happy with his son-in-law, when he finds out Greg is short on money and working for a drug company Jack becomes dubious about Greg and if he'll ever be a strong enough man to lead his family.

Continue: Meet The Parents Little Fockers Trailer

Bad Lieutenant Review


Excellent
On radio station WFAN, a man named "Mad Dog" unwaveringly defends his beloved Mets, who are down three games against the Dodgers in the series, to a battalion of cynical and hopeless New Yorkers. Somewhere in Manhattan, a nun is raped by two young men and left soiled at the bottom of the altar. A cop who takes a bump of cocaine only seconds after he drops his boys off at high school is in charge of keeping the city safe and, at night, he spends the money he stole and violently cajoled from criminals on swigs of vodka, sessions of free-basing and lesbian shows at a seedy hotel. If the Lord is in New York City, he stepped out for a minute.

Such are the totems of the godless world of Abel Ferrara's Bad Lieutenant, a season in hell that doubles as a vehicle for Harvey Keitel's blistering tour-de-force as the nameless officer that gives the film its name. Full to bursting with unadulterated drug use, violent sex, and moral decay, it also serves as Ferrara's most unfettered and primal ode to a one-time soulless New York that now looks more like a planet of condos.

Continue reading: Bad Lieutenant Review

Thelma & Louise Review


Essential
Thelma & Louise is a landmark film, one that defines the cinematic terrain for female empowerment and one that effortlessly blends powerful ideas about gender with an endlessly engaging story. The film weaves a story about women in distress, who come from depressed backgrounds and seedy locales, which is not entirely different from any prototypical Lifetime Movie of the Week. The genius of Ridley Scott's direction and Callie Khouri's groundbreaking screenplay is that they allow the film to flirt with standard archetypal conventions, all the while upending conventional notions of women -- particularly women in the sort of situation Thelma and Louise find themselves in.

The movie jumps headfirst into the action without any necessary build-up or labored background. We meet Louise, a headstrong waitress, and her younger, flighty friend Thelma (Geena Davis) as they finalize plans for their road trip. Nothing more or less complicated than that. Where they are going is fairly vague; why they are going is more telling: their explicit purpose in taking a trip is to escape from the men in their lives. Jimmy (Michael Madsen), Louise's longtime casual partner, is a gruff mechanic who loves Louise, but doesn't know how to show it. Darryl (Christopher McDonald), Thelma's husband, is a plain loser, a carpet salesman with a cheesy mustache, bouffant-fro, and a lack of respect for his wife.

Continue reading: Thelma & Louise Review

The Stone Merchant Review


OK
Harvey Keitel and Jane March in a smoldering European romance? Sounds like a late-night version of The English Patient (even the title, The Stone Merchant, feels like it). And sure enough, there's a love triangle at the core of this bizarre art film, but that is far from the case. Believe it or not, you're about to see a movie about terrorism, specifically Islamic extremism.

Leda (March) is married to Alceo (Jordi Mollà), a professor who lost both legs in a terrorist bombing and is making up for it with plenty of bitterness and bile. When Leda is held at gunpoint at an airport (this family can't catch a break!), they jet off for -- where else -- Turkey, Here they encounter a stone merchant (Keitel), who hawks $30,000 rocks out of what looks a little like a roadside fruit stand. He chamrs Leda, and after she returns home to Italy, they continue an affair. Meanwhile, Alceo is soon convinced of his wife's infidelity, as well as something suspicious about the stone merchant.

Continue reading: The Stone Merchant Review

Reservoir Dogs Review


Extraordinary
Now here's a stellar directorial debut from some guy named Quentin Tarantino.

Before he became a household name, Tarantino stunned us all with this low-budget tale analyzing the before-and-after (and remarkably very little of the "during") of a diamond heist. Set largely within the confines of one warehouse, the movie is so chock full of witty and quotable dialogue ("Mr. Brown? That sounds too much like Mr. Shit. ") and eye-popping scenes (when, say, the suspected cop is doused in gasoline and has his ear cut off) that it has become an instant classic. Not incidentally, it also remade both the heist movie and the gangster flick, spawning countless imitations, just like later Tarantino works would do.

Continue reading: Reservoir Dogs Review

The Bridge Of San Luis Rey Review


Terrible
There's a sure-fire way to spot a lurching cinematic failure: look at the stars. Not in astronomic terms, but in who is in it and why is it not getting buzz. You heard about Clint Eastwood's Mystic River a long time before it came out because it had a big cast and they were all excellent in the film. Furthermore, the film itself was brilliant, one of the best of that year. So, one has to wonder why a film starring Robert De Niro, Gabriel Byrne, Harvey Keitel, Kathy Bates, and F. Murray Abraham (all talented actors) was released and forgotten within a week? It happens once in a blue moon but when it does, look out! You're about to witness a sinker like none the world has seen. Stand in awe of Mary McGuckian's The Bridge of the San Luis Rey, a true, honest-to-God blunder.

Thornton Wilder's famed novel has been filmed three times, including this one. The story is interesting and its ideas on religion and corruption are certainly timely. Brother Juniper (Gabriel Byrne, wasted as a pointless framing device) has recently collected data and put it into a book about five souls who lost their lives when the Bridge of San Luis Rey collapsed. The book implicates a bit of a conspiracy concerning the bridge's collapse, but the Archbishop of Peru (Robert De Niro) sustains that it was an act of the devil and that Brother Juniper, and his book, are calculating heathens. Most of the film is a flashback to the events leading up to the bridge's failure, mainly concerning the wealthy Marquesa (Kathy Bates), a young actress Dona Clara (Émilie Dequenne), and their relationship with the Viceroy of Peru (F. Murray Abraham). The Viceroy has impregnated Dona Clara and is a bold faced hypocrite for first shunning the Marquesa and then making Dona show her respect and humility. The only one who seems to really care about the poor actress is Uncle Pio (Harvey Keitel), the head of the acting troupe that Dona Clara is in. The film leads up to both the breaking of the bridge and the court's judgment of Brother Juniper. Neither goes well, as you might imagine.

Continue reading: The Bridge Of San Luis Rey Review

Bugsy Review


Excellent
After writing, directing and starring in one of the most politically intriguing films of the 1990s, Bulworth, Warren Beatty vanished. He only resurfaced in 2001 in the deplorable Town & Country, which had been finished since 1999. There was no loud announcement of quitting Hollywood, he just stopped acting and started complaining about the Governator.

A consummate leftist, Beatty was always into politics and into political filmmaking, or films that took on big topics at least. So, the question must be asked why he would decide to star as one of the most flamboyant, vain gangsters of all time, Benjamin "Bugsy" Siegel. Not only did he act in the film, he was the reason it started. Beatty wrangled up James Toback to write the thing and then snagged Barry Levinson to direct the picture, and decided that the focus of the film should be the end of Siegel's career/life.

Continue reading: Bugsy Review

Shadows In The Sun Review


OK
It's one of the oldest tricks in the movies: If you've got a tired story, hide it under some gorgeous scenery by setting the film in an exotic locale. Tahiti, Paris, Niagara Falls. In this case, it's the most cliched of exotic locales: Tuscany. Why, entire films have been made about the joys of Tuscany (Under the Tuscan Sun, anyone?), with only the slightest of nods toward anything resembling a plot.

Shadows in the Sun isn't as bad as that monstrosity, though it's clear why this film merited a direct-to-DVD release. The whole thing's been done before, a lot: Slick, ambitious book editor (there's such a thing?) is tasked with luring a recluse into writing another manuscript. Naturally he falls in love with the daughter of the crusty writer. Joshua Jackson is the editor, Harvey Keitel is ingeniously cast as the writer, and Claire Forlani is the love interest. And there you have it. Of course our editor will learn a thing or two about life ("Take it easy, bro!") and the editor will exorcise his copious demons.

Continue reading: Shadows In The Sun Review

Bugsy Review


Excellent
After writing, directing and starring in one of the most politically intriguing films of the 1990s, Bulworth, Warren Beatty vanished. He only resurfaced in 2001 in the deplorable Town & Country, which had been finished since 1999. There was no loud announcement of quitting Hollywood, he just stopped acting and started complaining about the Governator.

A consummate leftist, Beatty was always into politics and into political filmmaking, or films that took on big topics at least. So, the question must be asked why he would decide to star as one of the most flamboyant, vain gangsters of all time, Benjamin "Bugsy" Siegel. Not only did he act in the film, he was the reason it started. Beatty wrangled up James Toback to write the thing and then snagged Barry Levinson to direct the picture, and decided that the focus of the film should be the end of Siegel's career/life.

Continue reading: Bugsy Review

Clockers Review


Weak
After the first 2 minutes of Clockers, during which a parade of bloody crime scene photos are splashed on the screen, you'll be ready to put down your popcorn. After the first 15 minutes, you'll be bored enough to go buy some more.

You can't imagine how sick and tired I was of hearing the hype surrounding Clockers, Spike Lee's latest film about (surprise!) African-Americans in Brooklyn who get into trouble with drugs, murder, and betrayal. Every other critic on the planet will probably say they love Clockers so as not to appear uncool. I'll give it to you straight.

Continue reading: Clockers Review

The Grey Zone Review


Essential
One of the most poignant moments in the grave Holocaust drama The Grey Zone comes as a group of Hungarian Jews known as the Sonderkommando try to save the life of a young girl who has come out of the death chamber alive. These Sonderkommando assisted the Nazis in the killing of fellow Jews in exchange for a four-month reprieve from their own death sentence. They received better food and more comfortable living quarters, but they knew all along that their time would eventually reach a similar, tragic end. "It makes no difference, we're dead anyway," one of the men coils. But for this one fleeting moment, their thoughts of death elude them as they rescue this seemingly inconsequential girl.

Many scenes, like the above, though thoroughly bleak and depressing, exemplify why The Grey Zone is such a beautiful film. Based on true events as told in the book Auschwitz: a Doctor's Eyewitness Account, the film chronicles the struggles faced by these Sonderkommando as they plan and eventually execute a fatal uprising that destroys two crematoriums inside the Auschwitz II-Birkenau death camp.

Continue reading: The Grey Zone Review

Rising Sun Review


OK
Wildly improbable (read: typical Crichton) tale about a murder in a Japanese office building. It's action heroes Connery and Snipes on the case, so look out! Plenty of Japanese subculture to be examined and often mocked, which led to charges of racism against the book and the movie.

Red Dragon Review


Very Good
Red Dragon has just about everything going against it.

It's the third movie in a series that won an insane number of Oscars (The Silence of the Lambs) and was promptly followed by one of the worst films in recent memory (Hannibal). It's a prequel... and its big star (Anthony Hopkins) is about 20 years too old. And it's a remake of a minor cult classic (Manhunter), a fantastic film which will invariably stomp the crap out of Red Dragon in the history books.

Continue reading: Red Dragon Review

Fail Safe (2000) Review


Very Good
CBS -- of all places -- remade the original, masterful Fail-Safe, a cautionary tale about nuclear war, jammed full of big name movie stars (check out that cast!), and shot in black and white from Walter Bernstein's original screenplay. It's a very faithful remake, even though the production values (it's shot on video) are atrocious. It's a fabulous original film and a worthwhile redo -- but it comes about 20 years too late. Why waste time remaking a tale about nuclear war with the Soviet Union -- a country that no longer existed -- in this millennium? Still, it's worth a look if you're a fan of the original.

U-571 Review


Good
It's finally time to reassess the submarine movie to see if it's outlived its useful life. I was skeptical enough when Crimson Tide came out in 1995, feeling like a knockoff of The Hunt for Red October, itself an homage to Das Boot, it something of an homage to Run Silent, Run Deep. They even made Down Periscope, which four years of therapy have not helped me to forget.

U-571 takes the Das Boot path, starring a dozen of the sweatiest men in Hollywood (the makeup department working overtime on this one), all led by everyone's favorite naked bongo player, Matthew McConaughey. Loosely based on real events, U-571 involves a WWII mission to capture a German Enigma encryption device from a sinking German submarine adrift in the middle of the Atlantic. Skipper Bill Paxton and his 2nd in charge McConaughey hop to the task, dressing up their wreck of a sub to look just like a German U-boat. One guy on the crew speaks German, so there shouldn't be a problem in posing as a rescue ship, right?

Continue reading: U-571 Review

Cop Land Review


Weak
Cop Land was supposed to do for Sylvester Stallone what Pulp Fiction did for John Travolta. Alas, the movie was (rightly) ignored by audiences and shrugged off by critics, thanks to an almost complete lack of anything so much as resembling a compelling story.

The plot is so simple as to defy description: A lot of New York cops live across the water in Jersey, and it turns out they are all beholden to the mob. It's up to fat, half-deaf Sheriff Freddy (Sly) to expose this atrocity!!! Would that there were more to say, Cop Land builds its "mystery" by simply not telling you what's going on. Only after an hour or so do you piece together the whole mob angle, and then the audience realizes, "Hey, there's nothing happening here!" Note to Mangold: Watch L.A. Confidential a few times if you want to see how clever plot structure goes, not to mention throwing in a little wit here and there.

Continue reading: Cop Land Review

National Treasure Review


Good
If there's one thing every good paranoiac knows, it's that the Freemasons founded America. But what nobody seems to know for sure is the reason they went to all that trouble. At last, director Jon Turteltaub brings to the screen a story bold enough to tell the whole story -- or, at least, one version of it.

You see, the Masons weren't always a massive fraternity of elderly men who carried out ancient rituals behind the closed doors of their lodges. Once upon a time, they were knights. The Knights Templar, to be precise. And the Templar discovered the greatest treasure in human history buried deep beneath the Temple of Solomon in Jerusalem. To keep their treasure safe from the greedy kings of Europe and England, they carried it across the Atlantic to the New World, where they eventually founded a country and built an elaborate system to protect their treasure forever. So begins the story of National Treasure.

Continue reading: National Treasure Review

Holy Smoke Review


Essential
It's so comforting to see a talented actor recover from the precarious heights of mass-market success. After Titanic, I was perfectly prepared to condemn Kate Winslet to the same pit of has-been obscurity Leonardo DiCaprio belongs in. Fortunately, Winslet didn't sink with the ship.

Holy Smoke is the entrancing story of two zealots on a collision course with fate. Ruth, played by Winslet, is a young Australian who finds what she believes to be the path to enlightenment through the influence of a Guru while on holiday in India. When Mum (Julie Hamilton) gets word, she cooks up a plot to lure Ruth home and hires top cult deprogrammer PJ Waters (Harvey Keitel) to bring her daughter to reason.

Continue reading: Holy Smoke Review

Bad Timing Review


Good
Nicolas Roeg's Bad Timing is often remembered by fans as a forgotten masterpiece and an unfairly censored classic, but has 25 years muddled their perception of a film that's really an experimental curiosity at best? Check out the new Criterion DVD and judge for yourself.

Bad Timing tells an extremely simplistic story: In Vienna, psychologist Alex Linden (Art Garfunkel) meets a mysterious blonde named Milena (Theresa Russell) at a party, and soon they strike up an affair. Eventually she turns up in the E.R. What happened? A detective (Harvey Keitel, attired and styled as the obvious model for Pulp Fiction's Vincent Vega) is sent in to investigate.

Continue reading: Bad Timing Review

The Duellists Review


Good
In every director's past there are some strange departures. Ridley Scott's directorial debut, The Duellists, is no exception: It's a competent but slow-paced outing that offers no hint that Scott would soon be making exciting thrillers like Alien and Blade Runner.

To be fair, The Duellists (based on Conrad's The Duel) is a type of movie made often in the 1970s -- a low-tech but visually authentic historical drama. As with '70s westerns, the point was to make a new kind of period drama emphasizing cinematic realism at the expense of entertainment values (instead of the other way around). The film is based on a Joseph Conrad story about a quarrel between two soldiers in Napoleon's army which turns into an obsessive folie a deux. Kind of a Gallic High Noon, but not as entertaining as High Noon.

Continue reading: The Duellists Review

Blue Collar Review


Very Good
Funny and depressing look at infighting and conspiracy in a fictional American auto union. A cult classic from the writer of Taxi Driver.

Shadrach Review


Good
Bizarre southern morality fable, about a poor man who encounters a homeless ex-slave on the verge of his death. Poor southern man must then come to grips with burying this guy. Uh, okay. 80 minutes of breezy cinematic fluff.

Fingers Review


Very Good
Rarely has a crime/gangster movie been produced with such a sense of calmness. Fingers, a cult classic, is a real showpiece for Harvey Keitel, who plays the title of Jimmy Fingers, a low-level gangster working for his father as a bag man but dreaming of becoming -- of all things -- a concert pianist.

Jimmy divides his day among busting caps, piano practice, and auditions for Carnegie Hall. The comparison to Taxi Driver is obvious, but these are far different films (and that said, Taxi Driver is a far better one, too).

Continue reading: Fingers Review

Little Nicky Review


Excellent
For better or for worse (mostly for the worse) Adam Sandler's back on the big screen. And it's pure, satanic family fun.

Little Nicky (Adam Sandler) is the devil's third---and least impressive---son. Bested in brains by his brother Adrian (Rhys Ifans) and in strength by his brother Cassius (Tiny Lester), Nicky finds little joy outside of hanging out in his hell-bound bedroom, banging his head to heavy metal favorites. That is, until his father's 10,000-year reign draws to a close and it's time to name the new ruler of Hades.

Continue reading: Little Nicky Review

The Grey Zone Review


Good

A harrowing, soul-searching account of the Holocaust is presented from a very unique perspective in "The Grey Zone," which is based in part on diaries found buried at Auschwitz and the memoirs of Miklos Nyiszli, a Jew who served as the camp's doctor and aided the abominable Josef Mengele in his experiments on prisoners.

The story tells of a 1944 revolt by the "Sonderkommando," a squad of Jewish internees who chose to serve as wardens of the concentration camp's gas chambers and crematoriums in exchange for a few more months of comparatively privileged life. In exchange for their detestable duties, they got larger quarters, fresh bed linens, good food, cigarettes, and the right to loot the belongings of new arrivals.

The selfishness and cowardice of this choice tortures most of the characters in this film, none more so than Hoffman (David Arquette in a rare dramatic and anguished performance), whom we see early on herding naked throngs into the "showers," promising "The sooner you shower, the sooner you'll be reunited with your families." As the doors are closed, the camera slowly creeps in on Arquette, hearing the gas pipes rattle to life and the screams that come moments later.

Continue reading: The Grey Zone Review

Little Nicky Review


Terrible

Having now seen "Little Nicky," in which Adam Sandler plays the retarded son of Satan, I have formulated a hypothesis I'm calling the Sandler Theory of Exponentially Obnoxious Returns. It goes something like this:

Adam Sandler goes out of his way to make each gimmick character he plays ("Billy Madison," "Happy Gilmore") more grating than the last, just to see how far he can push it before his easily amused fan base will turn on him.

His most detestable character to date had been "The Waterboy," but that Southern-fried dope was mister congeniality compared to Nicky, the little devil that couldn't. Sandler spends this entire movie with his face screwed up in a hit-by-a-shovel grimace and speaking in a silly, raspy voice like a little kid pretending to be sick so he can stay home from school. There's no joke here. It's just Sandler's version of stretching as an actor.

Continue reading: Little Nicky Review

Harvey Keitel

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Harvey Keitel Movies

Isle Of Dogs Trailer

Isle Of Dogs Trailer

Imagine a world without dogs. It hardly bears thinking about, but in this dystopian look...

The Comedian Trailer

The Comedian Trailer

Once, Jackie Burke was one of the biggest names in town; he was a comedian...

Youth Trailer

Youth Trailer

Mick and Fred have been friends lifelong friends, now both reaching their more senior years...

The Grand Budapest Hotel - Featurettes Trailer

The Grand Budapest Hotel - Featurettes Trailer

While preparing to film 'The Grand Budapest Hotel', director Wes Anderson and company scouted for...

By The Gun Trailer

By The Gun Trailer

Nick Tortano has always felt under pressure to do well in his life, no matter...

The Congress Movie Review

The Congress Movie Review

Fiercely original and wildly ambitious, this provocative drama is often thrilling simply because it's like...

The Congress Trailer

The Congress Trailer

'The Princess Bride' actress Robin Wright plays a fictional idea of herself, as someone struggling...

The Grand Budapest Hotel Movie Review

The Grand Budapest Hotel Movie Review

Wes Anderson's entertaining filmmaking style clicks beautifully into focus for this comical adventure. Films like...

The Grand Budapest Hotel Trailer

The Grand Budapest Hotel Trailer

The cast and crew of 'The Grand Budapest Hotel' discuss the story, the main characters'...

Grand Budapest Hotel Trailer

Grand Budapest Hotel Trailer

Gustave may be aloof and snobbish in many ways, but he's also extremely charming with...

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