Harry Andrews

Harry Andrews

Harry Andrews Quick Links

Film RSS

Barabbas Review


OK
Any good Christian or Jeopardy! fan knows that Barabbas was the murderer that the Romans chose to free rather than Jesus when Pontius Pilate asked them to pick someone to receive a pardon. The film (based on the novel of the same name) imagines -- with minimal attention to anything that is historically known -- what might have happened to Barabbas after he was freed, tracking him back into a life of crime, a decades-long sentence of hard labor, and a stint in the gladiator pit, all before he's eventually redeemed through the message of the man who hung on the cross instead of him. Barabbas, in keeping with the Biblical epics of its era, is overwrought and overlong, but Anthony Quinn is memorable in the leading role, even when the script is derivative of everything from Spartacus to Ben-Hur, films which were still fresh in the public's mind. Barabbas has aged poorly in comparison (though Spartacus isn't the masterpiece many wish it to be, either).

Alexander The Great Review


Grim
God help Oliver Stone if his upcoming Alexander is really a remake of 1956's Alexander the Great, as this film's press notes state.

Put simply, Alexander the Great is a colossal bore. Directed by Robert Rossen (The Hustler, All the King's Men), this visit to the epic well comes off far worse than contemporaries Ben-Hur and Cleopatra. What's the problem? Well, the troubles are legion. Start with Richard Burton, engaging here in the lead role of the philosopher/warrior/conquerer, but given a series of brooding sermons to deliver for well over two hours. Burton doesn't carry the movie as he absolutely has to; the result is an experience not unlike attending a late night lecture. Then there's the warfare. Those of us spoiled on modern epics like Troy will find the playful skirmishes here on the laughable side. Sure, you can stage a battle with just a couple hundred men and no special effects if you shoot it carefully, but if your warriors look tired and on the verge of striking, you won't quite get the necessary effect. My little brother and I had more authentic swordfights when we were kids, using sticks in the backyard. Pretty sad considering Alexander conquered Europe and Asia.

Continue reading: Alexander The Great Review

Theatre of Blood Review


OK
This is about as close as Vincent Price got to playing Hamlet, in his campy and bizarre Theatre of Blood. Recalling Dr. Phibes, Price once again plays a man hell-bent on revenge, only this time it's an actor murdering his former critics. Unfortunately the killings aren't as wild in the Theatre -- even a drowning in a vat of wine looks an awful lot like someone splashing around in water. Come on Vincent, throw in some food coloring for us! And Vinnie with an afro... some things are too frightening for the movies.

Continue reading: Theatre of Blood Review

Man of La Mancha Review


Grim
The translation from theatrical musical to movie musical doesn't get much more disastrous than in Man of La Mancha, a cheap, muddled, and badly put-together debacle that resoundingly establishes Arthur Hiller (who directed Love Story and Silver Streak) as one of cinema's most hit-and-miss directors.

La Mancha adapts the stage play with Peter O'Toole in the lead as both Don Quixote and Miguel de Cervantes: Cervantes is imprisoned by the Spanish Inquisition, finds his papers held ransom by his fellow inmates, and given a mock trial by them in order to determine whether they shall be returned. The trial takes the form of a reenactment of Don Quixote, Cervantes' adventurous tales of his alter ego. As the delusional Quixote, O'Toole jousts with a windmill and promptly rides to a nearby village, which he believes to be a castle holding his beloved Dulcinea (Sophia Loren). By his side is the lovable chubster Sancho Panza (James Coco), who sees the reality behind Quixote's grandiose delusions but finds himself taken in by them as well.

Continue reading: Man of La Mancha Review

Equus Review


OK
Why did Alan (Peter Firth) blind six horses one night? Because he's totally frickin' nuts, that's why. Nonetheless, it takes 137 minutes to drive that point home in Equus, wherein Richard Burton (playing Alan's psychiatrist) draws out Alan's bizarre mental confusion of religion, sex, and horses. In a series of intense shrink sessions, the truth is eventually made clear, well, as clear as possible, considering Burton's own insane rants, delivered directly to the camera. Good Will Hunting's got nothing on this looney bin! (Of note, since Equus, Firth has somehow made a career out of playing doctors and military officers.)
Harry Andrews

Harry Andrews Quick Links

Film RSS
Advertisement

Suggested

Zipper - Trailer

Zipper - Trailer

This political drama is a scandalous thriller starring Patrick Wilson and Lena Headey. It has been directed by Mora Stephens.

Seven Davis Jr - Universes Album Review

Seven Davis Jr - Universes Album Review

Seven Davis Jr.'s debut album, 'Universes', continues the astral theme in both title and tilt.

Advertisement
Chris Cornell - Euphoria Mo(u)rning (Re-Issue) Album Review

Chris Cornell - Euphoria Mo(u)rning (Re-Issue) Album Review

Chris Cornell refuses to stop, and on the eve of the release of his fourth solo album next month, he is reissuing his first solo album on vinyl and...

Puff Daddy & The Family - Finna Fet Loose ft. Pharrell Williams

Puff Daddy & The Family - Finna Fet Loose ft. Pharrell Williams

Pharrell Williams teams up with Puff Daddy and The Family on new single 'Finna Get Loose'.

Daniel Craig Hopes 'Spectre' Shows His Bond Is Not As 'Sexist And Misogynistic' As Before

Daniel Craig Hopes 'Spectre' Shows His Bond Is Not As 'Sexist And Misogynistic' As Before

The actor will have his fifth outing as the secret agent in 'Spectre' this November.

Advertisement