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Fingers Crossed: Kristen Wiig In The Running For Anchorman 2 Role


Kristen Wiig Steve Carell Adam McKay Judd Apatow Paul Rudd Christina Applegate Guy Pearce

We’re praying this latest rumor from The Wrap has got some substance to it. According to the movie industry insiders, Kristen Wiig is a likely candidate to play the role of Steve Carell’s love interest in the Anchorman sequel, Anchorman: The Legend Continues, for Paramount Pictures. Currently, no cast members have been selected, beyond the core few that we already know and love.

The new Anchorman instalment is being directed by Adam McKay, with Judd Apatow on production duties – under the Apatow Productions banner. We reckon Wiig would make a perfect addition to the Anchorman cast – she’s already proven her comic chops with the hit movie Bridesmaids, and we sense that her deadpan acting style would make for some raucous ROFL moments if she were cast alongside Will Ferrell, Paul Rudd, Christina Applegate and Steve Carell in the sequel to the 2004 hit. Anchorman fetched around $85 million at the box office and we’d put our money on a sequel being even more successful.

Kristen Wiig is one of the most in-demand actresses in Hollywood right now, thanks to the success of Bridesmaids. She recently starred in Imogene, an indie film that featured at the Toronto International Film Festival. She also been busy filming The Secret Life of Walter Mitty and Hateship Friendship, along with Guy Pearce

Continue reading: Fingers Crossed: Kristen Wiig In The Running For Anchorman 2 Role

Iron Man 3 Trailer


Tony Stark may be Iron Man, but he's feeling less than unbreakable these days. Plagued by nightmares and guilty feelings, he is forced to doubt himself and his ability to protect himself and the ones he loves against a new enemy; the formidably ruthless Mandarin. His doubts are only amplified when his world and his power source are brutally snatched from him and left to burn at the hands of his enemy and he is left with his own internal strengths and resourcefulness alone to find the perpetrator and end his reign of terror. Stark is finally made to confront himself and his superhero identity as Mandarin sets out to prove there are no real heroes in the world.

The third instalment of this Marvel adventure, 'Iron Man 3' is set to be the most hard-hitting of the movies so far with questions being raised less about Iron Man and more about the true Tony Stark and his deeper abilities. It has been directed by Shane Black (the writer of the 'Lethal Weapon' film series) who also co-wrote the comic action flick with Drew Pearce ('Lip Service', 'No Heroics'). It is set for a spectacular release in cinemas on April 26th 2013 in the UK.

Starring: Robert Downey Jr, Gwyneth Paltrow, Don Cheadle, Guy Pearce, Rebecca Hall, Stephanie Szostak, James Badge Dale, Jon Favreau, Ben Kingsley, Paul Bettany, William Sadler, Stan Lee, Yvonne Zima, Dale Dickey, Ashley Hamilton, Ty Simpkins & Spencer Garrett.

Continue: Iron Man 3 Trailer

Iron Man 3 Teaser Trailer Does The Trick


Robert Downey Jr Gwyneth Paltrow Ben Kingsley Guy Pearce Rebecca Hall

A brief but effective teaser trailer of the upcoming 3rd installment of the Iron Man series of movies has been released online.

Those cheeky devils at Marvel certainly do know how to tickle our movie-going-tastebuds. The 18 second trailer sees various scenes from the film, utterly rife with drama and intrigue. Tony Stark AKA Iron Man being harassed by the press, Pepper Potts in hysterical tears, overcome by fear as we see her trapped in something metal, somewhere dark, and Ben Kingsley who plays the hero's arch nemesis The Mandarin, loading a gun. None of it's surprising, but nothing could excite us more. As yet, the film is a long way off, but tomorrow (23rd Oct 2012) sees the release of the official full length trailer, which is just enough to keep us satisfied until the release of the movie.

Robert Downey Jr. again stars as the eponymous hero, and Gwyneth Paltrow returns to her role as his love interest, but this film will also include newbies Guy Pearce (Memento) and Rebecca Hall (Frost/Nixon), as the creators of a virus. ABC News reports a brief synopsis for the film, which reads: "With his back against the wall, Stark is left to survive by his own devices, relying on his ingenuity and instincts to protect those closest to him. As he fights his way back, Stark discovers the answer to the question that has secretly haunted him: Does the man make the suit or does the suit make the man?" A question everyone wants to know the answer to, but even with the trailer released tomorrow, we'll have to wait another 6 and a half months to find out! Iron Man 3 is set for release May 3rd 2013.


Guy Pearce Thursday 12th April 2012 promotes his new movie 'Lockout' during an interview

Guy Pearce
Guy Pearce
Guy Pearce
Guy Pearce

Video - A Relaxed Guy Pearce Takes Part In Lockout Interview


Guy Pearce, star of the upcoming 'prison break' movie Lockout, discussed the film during a satellite interview promoting the film. Here, he discusses the fact that he performed most of his own stunts although didn't come out of the filming process unscathed. He details the battle wounds he's picked up over the course of his career, revealing that he still bears scars from his part in The Count Of Monte Cristo.

Unfortunately for all sci-fi and Ridley Scott fans, when he was questioned about the highly anticipated Alien prequel Prometheus, he remained tight lipped so not to drop any spoilers

Lockout Trailer


In the near future the world most secure prison MS1 houses the most dangerous prisoners on Earth, floating precariously above the atmosphere offering no chance of escape for the convicts. That is until one convict in particular makes things increasingly inconvenient for those below him on Earth as he manages to unlock the cells of each prisoner, with an ensuing mass riot making things even more uncomfortable for authoritarians. What's worse is that the President's daughter, Emilie Warnock, just so happens to be on board the galactic detention centre. A rescue operation must be formed and ex-agent Snow takes on the lone mission to ensure her safe return as well as restore order in the prison.

Continue: Lockout Trailer

Guy Pearce and Golden Globe Sunday 15th January 2012 The 69th Annual Golden Globe Awards (Golden Globes 2012) HBO after party held at Circa 55 Restaurant

Guy Pearce and Golden Globe
Guy Pearce and Golden Globe

Guy Pearce and Kate Mestitz - Guy Pearce and Kate Mestitz Saturday 14th January 2012 9th Annual G'Day USA Gala held at the Grand Ballroom inside the Hollywood & Highland Center - Arrivals

Guy Pearce and Kate Mestitz
Guy Pearce and Kate Mestitz
Guy Pearce and Kate Mestitz
Guy Pearce and Kate Mestitz
Guy Pearce and Kate Mestitz
Guy Pearce

Guy Pearce and BAFTA Saturday 17th September 2011 9th Annual BAFTA Los Angeles Tea Party - Arrivals

Guy Pearce and Bafta
Guy Pearce and Bafta
Guy Pearce and Bafta
Guy Pearce and Bafta

Guy Pearce and Nick Adams - Guy Pearce and Nick Adams New York City, USA - Opening night after party for the Broadway musical production of 'Priscilla Queen Of The Desert' held at Pier 60 at Chelsea Piers. Sunday 20th March 2011

Guy Pearce and Nick Adams
Guy Pearce
Guy Pearce and Nick Adams

Guy Pearce - Sunday 20th March 2011 at Palace Theatre Opening night of the Broadway musical production of 'Priscilla Queen Of The Desert' at the Palace Theatre - Arrivals. New York City, USA

Guy Pearce
Guy Pearce
Guy Pearce

Animal Kingdom Review


Very Good
Gritty, harsh and extremely well-acted, this Australian crime drama really gets into the skin of its central characters. So even if the plot meanders rather badly in the final act, it holds our interest and sympathy.

When his mother dies of a heroin overdose, 17-year-old Josh (Frecheville) goes to live with his grandmother Janine (Weaver), whom he hardly knows. He also meets his four uncles (Mendelsohn, Edgerton, Ford and Stapleton), a criminal gang that's being hunted by a tenacious detective (Pearce). Even though he's only watching from the sidelines as his uncles try to change their way of making a living, Josh gets completely entangled in their shady dealings. And as the police start watching him as well, he starts to realise that he'll sink if he doesn't learn to swim.

Continue reading: Animal Kingdom Review

Guy Pearce - Sunday 16th January 2011 at Golden Globe Awards Los Angeles, California

Guy Pearce
Guy Pearce

Colin Firth and Guy Pearce - Tom Hooper, Colin Firth, Livia Giuggioli, Councilman Tom Lebonge and Guy Pearce Thursday 13th January 2011 at Star On The Hollywood Walk Of Fame Los Angeles, California

Colin Firth and Guy Pearce
Colin Firth
Colin Firth
Colin Firth
Colin Firth
Colin Firth

Guy Pearce Friday 7th January 2011 Hallmark Channel's Winter 2011 TCA held at Langham Huntington Hotel Pasadena, California

Guy Pearce
Guy Pearce
Guy Pearce

The King's Speech Review


Extraordinary

Momentous historical events add a remarkable kick to this fascinating personal drama, which is based on journal entries and firsthand accounts. besides being hugely entertaining, the film also gives Colin Firth yet another meaty role to dive into.

In 1925, Bertie (Firth), the Duke of York, is paralysed with fear when required to speak in public. After unsuccessful treatment for his stammer, his wife Elizabeth (Bonham Carter) locates unorthodox speech therapist Lionel Logue (Rush), an Australian who insists on familiarity even with the royals. But as Bertie begins to make progress, his life takes a dramatic turn when his brother Edward VIII (Pearce) abdicates the throne, leaving Bertie in place as George VI just as war breaks out with Germany. Now the nation really needs to hear his voice.

The sharp, often very witty script has the ring of truth to it, refusing to overplay big events or to create some miracle cinematic cure that sees Bertie rising to inspiring orator status. Even though it's still extremely crowd-pleasing, it's a much more complex story centring on the man behind the stutter, exploring the intimate, difficult journey Bertie must have taken before he was so suddenly thrust into the limelight.

As with last year's A Single Man, Firth invests the role with layered subtext that gives Bertie a fully fledged inner life far beyond the astute screenplay.
It's a beautiful performance that tells us as much with a quiet sigh as it does with a razor-sharp line of dialog. His banter with the excellent Rush is also full of substance, while Bonham Carter not only uncannily captures the Queen Mother's physical presence but also the strength of the woman who, together with her husband, would so bravely lead Britain through the Blitz.

Visually, the film transcends the usual costume-drama approach, with expert direction from Hooper that beautifully plays with perspectives and textures.
Also notable is the way the camera quietly captures expansive backdrops that continually remind us (and Bertie) that there's a whole nation out there waiting for his next word. And along the way, we strongly identify with Bertie, which makes his journey takes both stirring and thrillingly inspiring.

Don't Be Afraid Of The Dark Trailer


Moving into a new house is a fun and exciting time for most kids, finding new places to explore and play there's always lots of dark corners to go and hide in, but what if there's something else hiding in those dark corners? When a young girl called Sally moves in with her father and his partner it quickly becomes apparent that sometimes things aren't just in your head and sometimes monsters really do jump out and get you.

Continue: Don't Be Afraid Of The Dark Trailer

Guy Pearce - Denim jeans autographed by Guy Pearce for Jeans For Genes Day. Sydney, Australia - The official launch of 'Jeans For Genes Day 2010' in which jeans autographed by notable Australians will be auctioned at a gala dinner on July 22, 2010. Tuesday 6th July 2010

Guy Pearce

The Road Trailer


Watch the trailer for The Road

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The Hurt Locker Review


Excellent
It's intriguing to watch a battlefield movie that manages to be gritty and harrowing as well as sensitive and moving, but that's what Bigelow has done.

This is a film that often makes us flinch from the screen, mainly because of a superbly layered performance by Renner.

In war-torn Baghdad, the American bomb disposal team uses dry humour to cope with their job. But the new senior officer, James (Renner), is rather enigmatic and strange. His teammates Sanborn and Eldridge (Mackie and Geraghty) find his maverick attitude difficult, leading to tense exchanges in extreme situations.

Continue reading: The Hurt Locker Review

Bedtime Stories Review


Good
After dozens of movies, Adam Sandler remains hard to figure out. Most of Sandler's films slavishly follow the mold of most film comedies of the last decade or so: a somewhat funny male star (Ben Stiller, Owen Wilson, Vince Vaughn, Will Ferrell, Seth Rogen, Adam Sandler) is dropped into an unfunny premise with a lot of gross-out scenes and poop jokes to make up for the lack of laughs.

But the other part of Sandler's "oeuvre" consists of movies like Spanglish and Punch-Drunk Love -- odd hybrids of broad humor and quirk -- and toned-down, frothy mainstream comedies like Click and Bedtime Stories. It would be unfair to accuse Sandler of selling out his artistic vision in these films -- not only because Little Nicky wasn't art, but because the non-manic goofiness of Bedtime Stories may be closer to the real Sandler. And with some script consulting help, someday the real Sandler might make a really good film. Bedtime Stories isn't it, but at least it's mostly aimed in the right direction.

Continue reading: Bedtime Stories Review

Bedtime Stories Trailer


Watch the trailer for Bedtime Stories.

Continue: Bedtime Stories Trailer

Traitor Review


Weak
Can a thriller really be a thriller without thrills? Better yet, can an international spy story really succeed by purposefully getting us to sympathize with the enemy? That's the double edged sword being wielded by Jeffrey Nachmanoff with his new film Traitor. Even the title offers yet another bit of bifurcation -- on the one hand we have a deeply religious man (Don Cheadle) working with terrorists to blow up Americans. On the other, we see how he uses his faith as a means of undermining the group's most violent objectives. Of course, this doesn't make the tale interesting or exciting. Sometimes, just being different doesn't save you from being dull.

Samir Horn (Cheadle) was 12 when his cleric father was killed by a car bomb. After years struggling with Islam, he becomes an explosives expert, working within a radical faction. When FBI agents Roy Clayton (Guy Pearce) and Max Archer (Neal McDonough) storm their headquarters in Yemen, Samir and his cohorts are jailed. Soon, he is befriended by Omar (Said Taghmaoui) who recruits him to join his latest mission. Under the guidance of leaders Fareed (Aly Khan) and Nathir (Raad Rawi), Samir will construct 50 bombs, each one destined for a trip on a U.S. cross-country bus come Thanksgiving. As a man of conscience (and secrets), involvement in such a plot will test every fiber of his being -- and his loyalties.

Continue reading: Traitor Review

Guy Pearce and Don Cheadle - Guy Pearce and Don Cheadle New York City, USA - New York premiere of 'Traitor' at Regal Union Square Stadium 14 - arrivals Thursday 21st August 2008

Guy Pearce and Don Cheadle
Guy Pearce and Don Cheadle
Guy Pearce
Guy Pearce
Guy Pearce

Guy Pearce and Catherine Zeta-Jones - Guy Pearce and Catherine Zeta-Jones Monday 10th March 2008 Australian premiere of 'Death Defying Acts' at the State Theatre

Guy Pearce and Catherine Zeta-jones
Guy Pearce and Catherine Zeta-jones

First Snow Review


OK
What is it about Guy Pearce that makes him so attractively insular, even when he's playing an obnoxious halfwit who sells bargain basement linoleum? Last year, he started strong with his brooding performance in John Hillcoat's brutal The Proposition and ended as the only graceful note as Andy Warhol in the otherwise abysmal Factory Girl. Though it premiered at last year's Tribeca Film Festival, it's taken close to a year for someone to pick up First Snow, along with both Lonely Hearts and Comedy of Power, which also premiered at Tribeca last year. With the 2007 edition of the festival a paltry month away, a look at one of its more well-attended and well-received pieces is apt.

Pearce plays Jimmy Starks, a walking grease bucket of a salesman who is waiting for his car to get fixed when we first meet him (as if the name left any room for ethical clarity). Jimmy is trying to sell everyone: He attempts to sell a jukebox to a bar owner (he already has one), tries to sell his intellectual cynicism to a fortune teller (J.K. Simmons, playing it surprisingly low key), and tries to sell his respect to his colleagues and coworkers (William Fichtner and Rick Gonzalez, respectively). When the fortune teller tells him that he will go tits-up when the first snow hits, Starks responds with impervious flaunting and jittery paranoia. Self-aware and gaunt with confusion and doubt, Starks begins to take action to ensure he won't die. Not an easy charge with a vexed ex-partner (Shea Whigham), sneering and prodding through late night phone calls.

Continue reading: First Snow Review

Factory Girl Review


Good
At the outset, Factory Girl looks like thin material for a biopic: It covers the life of Edie Sedgwick, a college dropout propelled to "it" girl status by Andy Warhol in the sixties, only to lose herself, as "it" people often do, to drugs and fresher faces. The movie starts with her leaving college, ends well before her death at age 28, and (intentionally or not) presents a convincing case that she didn't do much with the years in between.

But so many filmed biographies cram from childhood to old age, resulting in filmed Cliff Notes, or a mini-series at twice the speed and half the scenes. That Factory Girl doesn't have to cover an Edie Sedgwick comeback -- that she dies young and off-camera -- is a perverse relief. George Hickenlooper's brief, sometimes impressionistic film is most illuminating when showing both the allure and the casualties of Warhol's free but detached Factory scene.

Continue reading: Factory Girl Review

The Proposition Review


Excellent

The opening of John Hillcoat's The Proposition wastes no time getting you in the mood. Four or five criminals are being shot at in a small shack and quickly answer back with ample fire power. Blood spurts everywhere, and two Asian prostitutes are quickly disposed of.

It's the 1880s: Dirt and dust are on the rise and hygiene is sadly in decline. The Burns brothers have been split up: Eddie (Danny Huston) has run off into the desert caves of Australia while Charlie (Guy Pearce) and Mike (Richard Wilson) have gotten snagged in a gunfight. The captain of the local English sheriffs, Captain Stanley (a brooding Ray Winstone), has ordered the hanging of Mike but tells Charlie that if he kills Eddie, he will turn them both free.

Continue reading: The Proposition Review

The Count Of Monte Cristo (2002) Review


Very Good
The classic Monte Cristo sandwich is a rich confection -- almost inedibly so -- composed of layered ham, turkey, swiss cheese, mayonnaise, mustard, and crusty bread, all battered in egg and fried in hot grease. The diner is meant to dip this in jam before shoving it down his gullet.

The 2002 incarnation of The Count of Monte Cristo is a remarkably similar experience, full of pleasing flavors yet probably too rich for everyday consumption -- but, as with all things, I figure you'll eat it if you're hungry enough. Sure enough, in this snail-slow winter movie season, Monte Cristo is just about the best thing going. Like the sandwich, this isn't gourmet fare -- it's a crowd pleaser meant to entertain for a few brief moments, nothing more.

Continue reading: The Count Of Monte Cristo (2002) Review

The Hard Word Review


Very Good
At first I thought it was an Aussie take on a heist film, with a clever angle on where one might find three cool specialists in armed robbery. Intriguing as that setup was, during the second act, the style had changed to a Philip Marlowe noirish crime piece. By the last act, I realized it was both of those, but with a campy unseriousness about it, sometimes reducing itself to a Keystone Kops comedy of errors.

Our three heroes are brother convicts sprung from prison because of their ability to pull off their capers with dispatch and safety. As the one who comes up with the clever strategies, ringleader Dale Twentyman (Guy Pearce) has certain standards, and one of them is his insistence that "no one gets hurt." His bothers Mal (Damien Richardson), a sweet and perhaps a bit retarded master chef (as far as the prison population is concerned), and Shane (Joel Edgerton), the sometimes raging, creepy, close-to-the-edge schizophrenic who likes to be called "Muscles," are perfectly willing to go along with Dale's insistence on carrying unloaded guns so long as he comes up with plans that work.

Continue reading: The Hard Word Review

The Adventures Of Priscilla, Queen Of The Desert Review


Good
Ah, how fun to see the bad boys of tomorrow (The Matrix's Hugo Weaving and L.A. Confidential's Guy Pearce) play drag queens down under. Will The Adventures of Priscilla become the next Rocky Horror Picture Show? It's too soon to say, but for sheer camp value, Priscilla is a lot of fun, even if it has next to nothing to say.

L.A. Confidential Review


Excellent
L.A. Confidential, despite what you've heard, is not the best film in 20 years. It's not even the best film of 1997 (current titleholder: In the Company of Men). But if you consider all films ever made that have the nasal Danny Devito providing voice-over work, L.A. Confidential is certainly at the top of that list.

Comparisons to Chinatown are obvious and appropriate. Both films take place in the Los Angeles of yesteryear, feature multi-layered crime riddles, and have stars with questionable morals as ersatz heroes. And both are very good. While Brian Helgeland and Curtis Hanson's script isn't the tight masterpiece that Chinatown is (the writers meander for a good 45 minutes before his story starts to shape up), and Faye Dunaway wasn't half the cheeseball that Kim Basinger is as the femme fatale, L.A. Confidentialmakes the audience do what few films of the 90s have achieved: think.

Continue reading: L.A. Confidential Review

Two Brothers Review


Very Good
Set against the dramatic backdrops of the ancient temples of Angkor in Cambodia and the jungles of Cambodia and Thailand, Two Brothers is a gorgeously filmed fable centering on two tiger cub brothers that suffer at the hands of humans, only to rise up against their captors and overcome. Let's just say that if you sided more with the tiger in the Siegfried and Roy mauling, this is definitely the film for you.

Director Jean-Jacques Annaud (Enemy at the Gates, The Lover) returns to wild animal territory last seen in his film The Bear, choosing to focus his latest project - a children's movie - on two live, non-talking, non-CGI tigers. The result is a pleasantly sweet-natured and sometimes remarkable kids' film. Perhaps the biggest shocker is that, in these days of Babe and Pixar, Universal let this honest tale get out of the edit room without CGI-ing in even a single eyebrow-raise on these cubs' faces.

Continue reading: Two Brothers Review

The Count Of Monte Cristo Review


Very Good
The classic Monte Cristo sandwich is a rich confection -- almost inedibly so -- composed of layered ham, turkey, swiss cheese, mayonnaise, mustard, and crusty bread, all battered in egg and fried in hot grease. The diner is meant to dip this in jam before shoving it down his gullet.

The 2002 incarnation of The Count of Monte Cristo is a remarkably similar experience, full of pleasing flavors yet probably too rich for everyday consumption -- but, as with all things, I figure you'll eat it if you're hungry enough. Sure enough, in this snail-slow winter movie season, Monte Cristo is just about the best thing going. Like the sandwich, this isn't gourmet fare -- it's a crowd pleaser meant to entertain for a few brief moments, nothing more.

Continue reading: The Count Of Monte Cristo Review

Ravenous Review


Weak
"You are who you eat." So goes the tongue-in-cheek (so to speak) tagline of Ravenous, the inexplicable black comedy by iffy directress Antonia Bird.

Set during the Mexican-American War, Ravenous starts with the promising tale of a soldier named Boyd (Pearce, from L.A. Confidential) who finds himself transferred to a remote Sierra Nevada outpost in the dead of winter. Enter Colqhoun (Carlyle), a traveller suffering from frostbite and famine... and who turns out to be, well, a bit of a cannibal.

Continue reading: Ravenous Review

A Slipping-Down Life Review


Good
In the kind of town people tend to think of leaving, a timid young woman leading a monotonous life suddenly flips into a mode of uncharacteristic spontaneity when she discovers a local honky-tonk singer with an attitude that rings her bell.

Evie Decker (Lili Taylor) lives with her sedentary and semi-senile father (Tom Bower) in a modest house on an uneventful street (shot around Austin, Texas) and works in a demeaning job at a rundown amusement park. Her moment of magic comes when, on a radio interview, the voice of struggling musician Drumstrings Casey (the cheeky faced Guy Pearce) says things that the interviewer has no possibility of relating to but with which Evie is in perfect harmony. He has plucked the right chord on her heartstrings and she wastes no time getting down to see him perform at the roadhouse with her closest friend, Violet (Sara Rue).

Continue reading: A Slipping-Down Life Review

Till Human Voices Wake Us Review


Weak
I feel sorry for Till Human Voices Wake Us, the new supernatural romance starring Guy Pearce and Helena Bonham Carter. Not because it's a good movie that won't get the respect it deserves - it is, in fact, a quite slow and heavy-handed film - but because it has the bad luck to open only one week before David Cronenberg's masterpiece Spider, a far better film that shares many of the same themes and devices. If timing is everything, Till Human Voices Wake Us has very little going for it.

Michael Petroni, the film's writer/first-time director, wrote the screenplay for Till Human Voices Wake Us while still attending LA's American Film Institute and, according to my press notes, won a couple of awards for this story, which concerns an Australian psychologist forced to confront his past demons after meeting a mysterious young woman while at his family's summer house to bury his father. Like Cronenberg's infinitely superior examination of the mind's destructive capacity for denial, the film exists on two planes: the present, which finds Dr. Sam Frank (Pearce) trying to figure out who Ruby (Carter) is and why she's in the small Aussie town of Genoa; and the past, in which we learn about Sam's childhood summer romance with a young beauty named Sylvia.

Continue reading: Till Human Voices Wake Us Review

Memento Review


Essential
Amnesia and a murder mystery? Isn't this usually the kind of thing that hackneyed thrillers are made of -- stuff like Unforgettable, so bad you had to scrape it off your shoe the minute you left the theater?

Usually it is. But Memento proves that a skilled director, writer, and cast can take even the most tired of formulas -- the man with the lost memory -- and spin it into something so refreshingly different and new that I don't hesitate to call it one of the best films I've ever seen.

Continue reading: Memento Review

The Hard Word Review


Good

The snappy caper: A planned-to-a-T, multi-million dollar racetrack robbery wrought with the danger of a double-cross.

The snappy cast: A sharp cadre of Aussies led by Guy Pearce and Rachel Griffiths (two of that country's finest acting exports) as a magnetically smug life-long greaseball and his playing-both-sides-against-her-own-middle tart of a disloyal wife.

The practical upshot: "The Hard Word" is a wily, performance-driven heist-gone-wrong picture with shrewd underworld savvy reminiscent of "Snatch" without the smug self-awareness.

Continue reading: The Hard Word Review

Ravenous Review


Good

"Ravenous" is a dark comedy thriller about cannibalismat an army post in the pre-Gold Rush Sierra Nevada. It's one of those high-conceptmovies that is easy to pitch to a studio head in 25 words or less by combiningtwo ideas into a sentence, in this case, "'Dances With Wolves' meetsthe Donner party."

Originally envisioned as more horror than parody, 20thCentury Fox changed directors early on because they wanted to emphasizethe humor angle, as the script was already rich with subtle irony -- ituses cannibalism as a metaphor for Manifest Destiny and drug addiction.

As a result of the change, the movie is often uncertainwhich way it wants to go, but once it finds its footing, the comedy elementsmix successfully into what is essentially a abstruse thriller.

Continue reading: Ravenous Review

The Time MacHine Review


OK

In 1960, director George Pal created a rather quaint film version of H.G. Wells' "The Time Machine" which was such a product of its day that now its doom-saying 20th Century nuclear war and its 800th Century society of idyllic, primitive blonde imbeciles seem far more like silly cinematic nostalgia than legitimate futurism.

Hollywood style de jour strikes again in this year's equally time-stamped yet curiously engaging remake, starring Guy Pearce ("Memento") as Alexander Hartdegen, Wells' late-19th Century intellectual aristocratic who travels through time in a handsome Victorian-era Rube Goldberg contraption of brass, glass and spinning dials.

Directed by Wells' great-grandson Simon Wells, the 2002 "Time Machine" opens with a modern movie motivational gimmick: It seems the murder of his true love drives our hero's desire to fiddle with temporal physics. After an obligatory failed attempt to turn back the clock and save her, Alexander heads into the future, hoping to somehow understand why he can't change the past.

Continue reading: The Time MacHine Review

Memento Review


Excellent

"Memento" opens with a seemingly motionless shot of a disturbing Polaroid photograph. A dead body lies face down with a bullet wound in the back of the head. As this shot lingers, the image in the snapshot begins to fade and lighten. Suddenly, the hand holding the photo shakes it around a little, like one does when waiting for a Polaroid to develop -- and the picture fades further. Soon the image of the body is gone completely.

By the time the blank photo jumps back into the camera and the flash goes off, you've already realized you're watching events unfold in reverse. Blood seeps up a wall and a gun flies back into the hands of the man with the camera. Bullet casings leap off the floor and reunite with bullets re-entering the barrel. The dead man stands up. You've just witnessed a murder -- backwards.

While the rest of action takes place in forward gear, the story of "Memento" continues to be told in retrograde. Writer-director Christopher Nolan ("Following") takes us back in time a few minutes to learn that the dead man, Teddy (Joe Pantoliano), was killed by Leonard Shelby (Guy Pearce) as vengeance for the rape and murder of his wife. More importantly, we learn that Leonard received a blow to the head while trying to save her and it severely damaged his short-term memory.

Continue reading: Memento Review

Till Human Voices Wake Us Review


Weak

It's difficult to be objective about a not-quite-satisfactory movie that only serves to remind you of a sensational one, and that's exactly what "Till Human Voices Wake Us" did for me.

It's a dead-lover's-ghost story about a handsome, disconnected Australian psych professor named Dr. Sam Frank (Guy Pearce, "Memento") who returns to his hamlet hometown for his father's funeral, only to find himself flooded with memories of the childhood sweetheart whose drowning has clearly haunted and disillusioned his whole life.

In flashbacks we see Sam as a cheerful 13-year-old (Lindley Joyner) falling tentatively in love with his best friend Silvy (Brooke Harmon), a sweet, open-faced girl whose spirit is completely unrestrained by the polio that keeps her in leg braces. In the present day, oh-so-serious adult Sam rescues a beautiful stranger (Helena Bonham Carter) he sees jumping from a train trestle during a rainstorm in an apparent suicide attempt. When she wakes in his father's house with total amnesia, the memories that eventually start returning to her seem to be those of Silvy -- a fact that both entrances and rattles Sam, and awakens his deadened soul.

Continue reading: Till Human Voices Wake Us Review

Two Brothers Review


Good

"Two Brothers" is a rare animal indeed: A critter movie not just for kids, with well-drawn, well-acted human roles that are more than just sidekicks for the stars of the show -- two extraordinarily expressive Asian tigers named Kumal and Sangha.

Generally a Serious Actor drawn to atypical grown-up dramas like "Memento" and "A Slipping Down Life," Guy Pearce is especially good as Aidan McRory, a famous, roguish adventurer, hunter and unscrupulous treasure profiteer in 1920s French Indochina, who becomes an occasional fixture in the tigers' lives. But Pearce also clearly understands he's in a supporting role and lets no movie-star pride get in the way of the story.

The first half of the film is about the cubhood of timid, curious Kumal and bold, protective Sangha, and how each comes to be captured as humans encroach on their territory and each of their parents is shot. Coincidentally, both tigers are rescued separately by McRory, but his own misfortune (he's arrested for looting archeological sites) leads to Kumal being sold to a gypsy circus, where his spirit is broken, and Sangha being turned into a trained killer by the emperor's private zookeeper.

Continue reading: Two Brothers Review

A Slipping Down Life Review


OK

Toni Kalem's "A Slipping Down Life" has been sitting on the shelf since 1999, and it's not hard to see why. Based on Anne Tyler's novel, it tells the story of Evie Decker (Lili Taylor), an introverted small-town girl who becomes fascinated with a Jim Morrison-like singer/songwriter, Drumstrings Casey (Guy Pearce).

While the rest of Casey's audience grows impatient with his impromptu on-stage poetic babblings, Evie feels she understands him and carves his name on her forehead -- backwards so that she can read it in the mirror. Because of her stunt, she gets to meet her idol and forms a strange relationship with him.

"A Slipping Down Life" awkwardly straddles realism and dream imagery, but neither works very well. Evie is so shy and quiet that she appears psychologically damaged, and she is so incompatible with her two best friends (Shawnee Smith and Sara Rue) that you spend the film wondering why they would ever hang out together.

Continue reading: A Slipping Down Life Review

Guy Pearce

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Guy Pearce

Date of birth

5th October, 1967

Occupation

Actor

Sex

Male

Height

1.80


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