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Gus Van Sant's The Sea Of Trees Set For US Release


Gus Van Sant Matthew Mcconaughey

The film's star Matthew Mcconaughey doesn't mind how people react. "I would say, real simply, anyone has as much right to boo as they do to ovate." In the film, McConaughey plays Arthur, a man who walks into Japan's notorious Aokigahara Forest to kill himself, for reasons that are discovered through flashbacks. Costars include Naomi Watts as his wife and Ken Watanabe as a suicidal man he meets in the woods.

Matthew McConaughey stars in Gus Van Sant's The Sea Of Trees

McConaughey enjoyed Van Sant's loose approach to the narrative. "I like a lot of his work and we just came together on this one," he says. "It's hands down an exceptional script. It moved me. Rarely do I stand up and have to walk around and yell at a script on the page as I read it. I cried at this script. I was mad at it. I was screaming. That doesn't happen very often."

Continue reading: Gus Van Sant's The Sea Of Trees Set For US Release

Gus Van Sant - 28h Annual Santa Barbara International Film Festival - Montecito Award Santa Barbara California United States Saturday 26th January 2013

Gus Van Sant
Gus Van Sant

Hot Tickets - US Movie Releases - Did We Need Texas Chainsaw Massacre 3D? Opinion Divided By Matt Damon's Promised Land


Matt Damon Frances McDormand John Krasinski Gus Van Sant Andy Garcia Eva Longoria Forest Whitaker Mark Hamill Danny Trejo James Duval Sonny Chiba

The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey and Django Unchained are riding high at the top of the US box office charts and as the movie industry lurches slowly into the new year, it’s likely that they’ll remain there. After all, an unsolicited addition to the Texas Chainsaw collection is hardly going to have the pulling power to shift some of the biggest movies of last year off the top of that chart.

That, however, is one of the biggest movies of the week: Texas Chainsaw Massacre 3D. That’s right. An extra dimension has been added to the Texas Chainsaw Massacre story. No, we’re not sure why, either. The phrase “let’s leave well alone, shall we?” springs to mind. The horror genre was just fine and dandy with the original Texas Chainsaw Massacre, the other Texas Chainsaw Massacre, Texas Chainsaw Massacre: The Beginning and Texas Chainsaw Massacre: The Next Generation and... okay all you need to know is that there are already seven of these movies.. but hey, now we have one in 3D, so that, presumably, you can fear not only for the safety of the characters onscreen, but also for the integrity of your own eyeballs, as chainsaw after chainsaw comes flying out of the screen and straight towards your face.

In a classic game of paper, scissors, stone, it becomes quickly apparent that ‘chainsaw’ beats ‘wooden door’ as good old Leatherface wreaks havoc with his favourite power tool once more. Unsurprisingly, it has been met with a tired response, with one reviewer on Rotten Tomatoes describing the film as a “giant turd of a movie.” So, probably not bound for big bucks box office success, then. Bound to divide audiences this one. Divide them between ‘Don’t really like it’ and ‘Really don’t like it,’ that is.

Continue reading: Hot Tickets - US Movie Releases - Did We Need Texas Chainsaw Massacre 3D? Opinion Divided By Matt Damon's Promised Land

Video - Matt Damon, Scoot McNairy And Marc Cohn At 'Promised Land' Premiere


Among arrivals for the 'Promised Land' premiere in New York were the movie's stars Matt Damon with his wife Luciana Barroso, Scoot McNairy with his wife and 'Monsters' co-star Whitney Able, John Krasinski, Rosemarie DeWitt and her husband Ron Livingston. Producer Mike Sablone and director Gus Van Sant were also present.

Continue: Video - Matt Damon, Scoot McNairy And Marc Cohn At 'Promised Land' Premiere

Gus Van Sant Saturday 23rd June 2012 2012 Palm Springs ShortFest Day 5 held at the held at the Renaissance Hotel

Gus Van Sant
Gus Van Sant

Gus Van Sant Saturday 23rd June 2012 The ShortFest Spirit Short Film Award during the 2012 Palm Springs ShortFest, held at the Camelot Theatre - Day 5

Gus Van Sant
Gus Van Sant and Matthew Modine
Gus Van Sant and Matthew Modine
Gus Van Sant
Gus Van Sant
Gus Van Sant

Bryce Dallas Howard, Gus Van Sant and Mia Wasikowska Friday 13th May 2011 2011 Cannes International Film Festival - Day 3 - Restless - Photocall Cannes, France

Bryce Dallas Howard, Gus Van Sant and Mia Wasikowska
Henry Hopper, Bryce Dallas Howard and Mia Wasikowska
Bryce Dallas Howard and Mia Wasikowska
Bryce Dallas Howard and Mia Wasikowska
Bryce Dallas Howard and Mia Wasikowska
Bryce Dallas Howard, Gus Van Sant and Mia Wasikowska

Paranoid Park Review


Essential
A whole new sort of entry into his ongoing homage to the city of Portland, Oregon, Gus Van Sant's boundlessly-brilliant Paranoid Park returns him to the hallways that he last visited in 2003's haunting post-Columbine art-flick Elephant. Leaving behind what many perceived as the "static" style of filmmaking that populated his three previous works, the Kentucky-born filmmaker now inches closer to creating a new cinematic vernacular, one where the strings are cut from conventional audio and visual structuring to allow for a strikingly effective sense of character and tone.

Rooting around in the audio/visual debris of Park is a story about the schisms that occur in a teenager's life when he accidentally becomes part of a security guard's gruesome death but this accidental murder works simply as catalyst for Van Sant. Alex, played by fresh-faced Gabe Nevins, who was infamously cast through MySpace, spends most of the 78-minute runtime remembering bits and pieces of his weekly routine days that are filtered through the tragedy that occurs in the train yards outside Burnside Skate Park, nicknamed Paranoid Park. Writing a letter to his friend Macy (Lauren McKinney), deflowering his girlfriend (Taylor Momsen of TV's Gossip Girl) unwillingly, skateboarding and music-shopping with his friend Jared (Jake Miller): All these actions are repeated, clipped, fractured, and overdubbed in Alex's frazzled memory and deftly arranged by Van Sant, who serves as editor as well as writer and director.

Continue reading: Paranoid Park Review

Gus Van Sant Saturday 18th April 2009 The 20th Annual GLAAD Media Awards held at the Nokia Theater - Outside Los Angeles, California

Gus Van Sant
Gus Van Sant

Gus Van Sant, Academy Of Motion Pictures And Sciences and Academy Awards Sunday 22nd February 2009 The 81st Annual Academy Awards (Oscars) - Arrivals Hollywood, California

Gus Van Sant, Academy Of Motion Pictures And Sciences and Academy Awards

Gus Van Sant - Saturday 31st January 2009 at Directors Guild Of America Los Angeles, California

Gus Van Sant

Gus Van Sant - Thursday 8th January 2009 at Critics' Choice Awards Los Angeles, California

Gus Van Sant
Gus Van Sant
Gus Van Sant
Gus Van Sant
Gus Van Sant

Gus Van Sant Tuesday 6th January 2009 attends the 2009 Palm Springs International Film Festival Awards Gala held at the Convention Center. Palm Springs, California

Gus Van Sant
Gus Van Sant

Gus Van Sant - Monday 5th January 2009 at New York Film Critic's Circle Awards New York City, USA

Gus Van Sant
Gus Van Sant

Paranoid Park Trailer


Winner of the 60th anniversary award at this year's Cannes Festival, director Gus Van Sant (Elephant, Last Days) returns with the highly anticipated film Paranoid Park. 

Continue: Paranoid Park Trailer

Paris, Je T'aime Review


Good
One would like to think that there at least a few other cities in the world besides Paris that could have inspired a film as varied in the types of cinematic pleasure so ably delivered by the anthology piece Paris Je T'Aime -- but it seems unlikely. This isn't due to an unavailability of good stories or locations in many other great metropolises, but more because being able to dangle the possibility of shooting in Paris in front of the world's greatest directors is going to be so much more enticing. Also, there are few other cities besides Paris that come with such a powerful and multifarious wealth of preassociated images and emotions for both filmmaker and audience to both draw upon and react against. So what could have been a collection of short films with a few highs, several lows, and a lot of muddled in-betweens is in fact a remarkably and consistently imaginative body of work, practically giddy with energy, that only rarely touches the ground.

Project overseers Emmanuel Benbihy and Tristan Carné wanted to create a cinematic map of Paris, with each short film representing one of the city's 20 arrondissements (neighborhoods). They ended up with 18 films, none of them more than a few minutes long and directed by a glittering, international roster of filmmakers. While none of the films here are anything approaching masterpieces, hardly a one is in any way a chore to sit through, which has to be some sort of an accomplishment.

Continue reading: Paris, Je T'aime Review

My Own Private Idaho Review


Extraordinary
Mike Waters (River Phoenix) is a narcoleptic street hustler who lives in the bus terminal, streets, and abandoned buildings of Portland, Oregon, and who dreams of one day finding his mother. Fellow hustler Scott Favor (Keanu Reeves) takes care of Mike - he hauls the other man to safety when a sudden sleeping spell comes upon him, usually triggered by stress or memories of home - and although he too lives in the streets and makes a living accommodating the sexual whims of paying customers, he's the scion of a wealthy and powerful Portland family with every reason to believe that that wealth and power will one day be his own. Mike's in love with Scott; he says as much one night when Scott is explaining that love is something customers pay you to provide. "I love you and you don't pay me," Mike counters. In this lowlife milieu, such a bare declaration amounts to an act of grace. But Scott lets it pass and the moment slides by.

Phoenix, in interviews, was clearly thrilled when writer/director Gus Van Sant credited him with having written this scene in Van Sant's wonderful 1991 movie My Own Private Idaho. He should have been. Emotionally, it's a doozy, and it serves as the point at which these two fractured lives separate into their own trajectories. Mike's takes him back again and again to the same dogged search for love and the same stretch of empty highway. Scott's takes him to Italy, where he falls in love with the beautiful Carmella (Chiara Caselli) and, ultimately, to an encounter in Portland with his street mentor Bob (William Richert). Here the movie takes an unexpected Shakespearean turn as Van Sant lifts fragments from Henry IV, casting Scott as Prince Hal to Bob's Falstaff, even as Mike's story continues on in the real world. We know from Shakespeare that Scott will turn his back on his old friends and assume the throne in the end. If Mike is heartbroken it's because life in the real world is hard; that's why we have private ones.

Continue reading: My Own Private Idaho Review

Gerry Review


Very Good
Gus Van Sant's Gerry is a minimalist buddy film about two guys getting lost in the desert. Matt Damon and Casey Affleck play the only characters, and the two wander aimlessly for days, obligingly dwarfed by the barren landscape.

This is a slow movie, and intentionally so. The entire film comprises less than 100 shots -- one of which is a sunrise in real time. The rest of it is nearly as prolonged; the young men walk in utter silence for about ten minutes, and we get a similarly extended view of Affleck lost in thought.

Continue reading: Gerry Review

Last Days (2005) Review


Extraordinary
Completing a stylistic and thematic trilogy begun with 2003's Gerry and Elephant (and inspired by the work of Hungarian auteur Bela Tarr), Last Days finds director Gus Van Sant once again engaging in breathtaking experimentation with sound, image, and content. Just as Elephant was modeled after, but not a faithful depiction of, the Columbine high school shootings, so Van Sant's latest - charting the final hours of a reclusive, iconic rock star in his remote country mansion - is simultaneously about and not about Kurt Cobain, a hypothetical rumination on the deceased musician that shares with his preceding films a hypnotic sense of time and space, as well as a fascination with the prosaic moments proceeding death. Having turned his back on the staid narrative conventions of formulaic Hollywood dramas (including his own Finding Forrester and Good Will Hunting), Van Sant now embraces an avant-garde aesthetic concerned with finding truth through non-linear storytelling and a focus on environmental tone and texture, both of which are employed as a means of placing viewers in a particular physical and emotional "space." And with Last Days, this unorthodox filmmaking achieves a state of sublime cinematic nirvana.

"Teenage angst has paid off well / Now I'm bored and old," sang Cobain on Nirvana's Serve the Servants, and one can feel that infectious malaise throughout Van Sant's portrait of Blake (Michael Pitt), a grungy icon living out what a friend (Kim Gordon) dubs "a rock and roll cliché." Donning Cobain accoutrements such as a hunter's cap and a green-and-red sweater and sporting shoulder-length blond hair, Blake spends the film sleepwalking around his backwoods home and property with a mixture of drug-addled bewilderment and spiritual melancholy, and Pitt embodies this wayward soul - whose rambling exploits involve wearing a black spaghetti-strap dress and toting a rifle - with a hunched, drooping-to-the-floor sagginess (as if under tremendous strain) that's at odds with the actor's slender physique. His constantly incomprehensible muttering, such as during an amusing, chance encounter with a telephone book salesman (where the only audible Blake line is telling: "Success is subjective"), echoes Cobain's frequently indecipherable lyrics while also conveying a torturous emotional detachment. Trapped in Van Sant's constrictive full frame (employed to heighten the oppressive claustrophobia gripping the character), Pitt's Blake is a zombie who, as revealed by the film's opening scene - finding him symbolically baptizing himself in a tree-shrouded lake, and later whispering and then roaring "Home on the Range" to the empty nighttime forest - desperately seeks communion with the world around him.

Continue reading: Last Days (2005) Review

Even Cowgirls Get The Blues Review


Terrible
A pair of wildly divergent views on Gus Van Sant's Even Cowgirls Get the Blues... -Ed.

Don Willmott, 1 star [lowest rating]

Continue reading: Even Cowgirls Get The Blues Review

Psycho (1998) Review


Extraordinary
Well, they did it. Right down to the last scene where Marion Crane's car is dragged out of the river. And it's great. It is scarier, more frightening, and more disturbing than the original. And I was fair too. The day after watching the new version, I watched the old version. I generally don't like movies in black and white but I found the old version very enjoyable.

Now I now I'm the only critic who is going to say this in the world, but I thought Vince Vaughn was more effective as Norman Bates than Anthony Perkins was. There, I said it. Vaughn had a presence and a confidence on screen that paid off for him. Tony Perkins was great. So was Vaughn. Almost every aspect of the movie is better in a way except for the roles of Marion Crane and her boyfriend. Janet Leigh was more attractive and definitely a better actress then Anne Heche. Viggo Mortinsen is too dead-voiced for a major role in a thriller/horror movie. I just want to give this guy some coffee and get him to wake up.

Continue reading: Psycho (1998) Review

Gus Van Sant

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Gus Van Sant

Date of birth

24th July, 1952

Occupation

Filmmaker

Sex

Male

Height

1.75


Gus Van Sant Movies

The Canyons Movie Review

The Canyons Movie Review

Movies that allow us to wallow in a trashy story for a couple of hours...

Promised Land Trailer

Promised Land Trailer

Steve Butler is a successful businessman as part of a natural gas company who wishes...

Restless Trailer

Restless Trailer

Enoch is a quiet teenage boy with an unusual hobby: he likes to attend funerals....

Paranoid Park Movie Review

Paranoid Park Movie Review

A whole new sort of entry into his ongoing homage to the city of Portland,...

Paranoid Park Trailer

Paranoid Park Trailer

Winner of the 60th anniversary award at this year's Cannes Festival, director Gus Van Sant...

Paris, Je T'aime Movie Review

Paris, Je T'aime Movie Review

One would like to think that there at least a few other cities in the...

Last Days (2005) Movie Review

Last Days (2005) Movie Review

Completing a stylistic and thematic trilogy begun with 2003's Gerry and Elephant (and inspired by...

Even Cowgirls Get The Blues Movie Review

Even Cowgirls Get The Blues Movie Review

A pair of wildly divergent views on Gus Van Sant's Even Cowgirls Get the Blues......

Elephant Movie Review

Elephant Movie Review

Gus Van Sant has made an eclectic career out of portraying vastly different avenues that...

Jay & Silent Bob Strike Back Movie Review

Jay & Silent Bob Strike Back Movie Review

Somewhere out there in the cinematic ether there's an elusive line between lewdly moronic raunch...

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