Greta Scacchi

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The Falling Review


Extraordinary

While cinematic blockbusters tickle the eyes, this film dazzles the soul. This is a remarkably evocative drama that gets deep under the skin, challenging us to see ourselves in a rather outrageous situation that shifts from quietly disturbing drama to unsettling freakiness. It's strikingly written, directed and performed to get into our heads and stay there like few movies do.

The story is set in 1969 in a girls' school located in the lush English countryside, where 16-year-old Lydia (Maisie Williams) and her best pal Abbie (newcomer Florence Pugh) are members of the Alternative School Orchestra. They're also inseparable, carving their undying love into a tree trunk. But once Lydia has sex with a boy, their relationship begins to shift. And when Abbie faints in class, it seems to become contagious. Suddenly girls are collapsing all around the school, much to the consternation of the headmistress (Monica Dolan) and her stern deputy (Greta Scacchi). As the hysteria spreads, Lydia gets increasingly confused by the occult beliefs of her older brother (Joe Cole) and the agoraphobic behaviour of their mother (Maxine Peake). But what she really misses is her childhood connection with Abbie.

Writer-director Carol Morley (Dreams of a Life) lets this play out like a deranged fairy tale in which Lydia's voyage to self-discovery is both wondrous and terrible at the same time. In its vivid exploration of feminine adolescence, the film echoes such classics as Picnic at Hanging Rock or Heavenly Creatures, by way of David Lynch and Nicolas Roeg (whose son Luc is one of the producers here). And the bold, knowing themes are echoed in gorgeously artful cinematography by the great Agnes Godard plus a stunner of a soundtrack by Tracey Thorn. Amid this sumptuous atmosphere, Morley weaves an enigmatic story packed with mystery, revelations and yes, burgeoning sexuality. But even more than this, the film taps in to the earth-mother power girls discover as they emerge into womanhood.

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The Falling Trailer


In 1969, an all girls' school in rural Britain come under attack from an unknown epidemic. Strange rashes and frequent fainting begin to affect the young girls, leading to some serious changes having to be made. The young girl seen to be at the centre of the epidemic is Lydia Lamont ('Game of Thrones' star Maisie Williams) and her best friend. When the two vow to never part from one another and carve their initials into a tree in the school, they come under fire for suppose occultist tendencies, forcing Lydia to search out and find the cause of the outbreak herself.

Continue: The Falling Trailer

Greta Scacchi Relished Playing Bette Davis On Stage


Greta Scacchi Bette Davis

Actress Greta Scacchi relished the chance to play Bette Davis on the London stage last year (11), hailing it as "the best role" she has ever had.

The Heat and Dust star appeared alongside Anita Dobson in the play Bette and Joan, about the personal and professional relationship between Davis and Joan Crawford - and she was only too happy to accept a role so different to her usual performances.

Speaking on U.K. chat show Loose Women, she says, "It's the best role I've ever had - the range... Actors always want to play different types, we don't want to be typecast, but typecasting is the nature of success so for years I had to look pretty and elegant and very often be well-behaved or cold-hearted and mean but actually in life I'm half Italian and I'm quite hot-blooded and expressive.

"And I felt very often my acting had to be more restricted, more restricted in my behaviour than I am in life and Bette gives me a chance to let it all out."

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At The ITV Studios

Greta Scacchi and ITV Studios Thursday 12th April 2012 at the ITV studios

Greta Scacchi and Itv Studios
Greta Scacchi and Itv Studios
Greta Scacchi and Itv Studios

Scacchi Driven Out Of Home After Village Feud


Greta Scacchi

Actress Greta Scacchi has been forced to leave her country home after an ongoing feud with a neighbour.

The Heat and Dust star has quit her cottage in Sussex, England after a five-year legal battle with nearby resident Slorina Saydhun, which was sparked over who should pay to have a private road resurfaced.

The spat escalated after Saydhun allegedly refused to honour a court order to pay some of the repair costs back to Scacchi, who in turn erected a locked metal gate on the road.

The move has caused outrage among locals, who can no longer access a set of stables, and Scacchi admits the dispute has prompted her to leave the property after 18 years.

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Scacchi Relives Heartache For Acting Role


Greta Scacchi

Actress Greta Scacchi has used her "painful" heartache over former lover VINCENT D'ONOFRIO to resurrect her acting career in a new show on London's West End.
The White Mischief star was so devastated when she split from D'Onofrio in 1992 she couldn't act for four years - crushing her blossoming Hollywood career.
But Scacchi admits she was forced to resurrect those life-changing emotions for her new role as Hester Collyer in Terence Rattigan's drama The Deep Blue Sea.
She says, "With Rattigan, the convention is that you keep a stiff upper lip and nobody shows any emotion.
"But he (director Edward Hall) got us to really plumb the depths of these emotions and use our own stories. It was quite a cathartic experience.
"I felt I had reawakened stuff in my own situation of overwhelming sexual passion that was unrequited. It was very, very painful and quite scarring."

Scacchi's Syriana Anguish


Greta Scacchi George Clooney Stephen Gaghan

British actress Greta Scacchi considered taking legal action when her entire role was cut from George Clooney blockbuster SYRIANA.

The 46-year-old hoped the movie would relaunch her career, but was stunned when executive producer Clooney and director Stephen Gaghan dropped her storyline completely.

Scacchi only decided against seeking legal advice when her salary was paid in full.

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The Browning Version (1994) Review


Excellent
Smitten with the original Browning Version, and rightly so, Mike Figgis remade the lovely little film in 1994. It's quite a faithful remake, updating it to the present day but leaving virtually all of the story and much of the dialogue intact. In many ways it's unneccesary as a remake -- the original still stands up well -- though Albert Finney is perfectly cast in the role of a hated prep school teacher on his last day on the job... and how that might change, however slightly, before the day is out. Watch both versions together if you can to catch the little nuances that Figgis tweaks and fiddles with, though for God's sake watch a comedy after the double feature is over.

Festival In Cannes Review


Excellent
Attending a film festival is a remarkable experience. For a few solid days, a individual can recline in comfortable movie theater seats, consume buckets of warm, buttery popcorn, and enjoy cold fountain drinks. People can also relish that rare film which hasn't been mistreated by studio budgets or stipulations by censor boards. It's altogether a little slice of heaven, and Festival in Cannes provides an insider's look at such an experience.

Each year, hundreds of film festivals transpire, but Cannes is definitely one of the most celebrated. Indie director Henry Jaglom takes us within the 1999 Cannes Film Festival and regenerates the flavor of what it's like to be there. As the movie opens, Jaglom inserts a montage of photographs featuring actors and filmmakers who have visited the festival earlier. Actors like Grace Kelly, Charlie Chaplin, and directors like Alfred Hitchcock have attended.

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Beyond The Sea Review


OK

This Bobby Darin biopic reportedly spent about 20 years going through various drafts by many different screenwriters -- including James Toback and Paul Schrader -- before Kevin Spacey grabbed it and made it all his own.

Borrowing more than just a little from Bob Fosse's "All That Jazz," the co-writer, director and star sets his film in a kind of flashback/dream structure in which Darin (Spacey) talks with himself as a little kid. This non-reality also allows for the 45 year-old actor to play Darin, who died at age 37, throughout his career.

Spacey's Darin thinks very highly of himself; when he snatches up teen heartthrob Sandra Dee (Kate Bosworth) as his wife, it feels more like trophy gathering than romance. Yet Spacey's own gigantic hubris fits the part perfectly, and when Darin grouses about not winning the Oscar for "Captain Newman, M.D.," you can feel Spacey going through the same thing. When Spacey sings in Darin's voice, it's an act of supreme ego; he's as sure of his Darin impersonation as he is of his own greatness, and it works.

Continue reading: Beyond The Sea Review

D'onofrio Splits From His Wife


Vincent D'Onofrio Greta Scacchi

THE CELL star Vincent D'Onofrio has reportedly split from his model wife CARIN VON DER DONK after five years of marriage.

The 44-year-old actor's heavy work schedule has been blamed for the break-up, according to American tabloids.

The couple have a three-year-old son ELIAS, and D'Onofrio has an 11-year-old daughter, LEILA, from his previous relationship with British actress Greta Scacchi.

24/10/2003 09:14
Greta Scacchi

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Greta Scacchi Movies

The Falling Movie Review

The Falling Movie Review

While cinematic blockbusters tickle the eyes, this film dazzles the soul. This is a remarkably...

The Falling Trailer

The Falling Trailer

In 1969, an all girls' school in rural Britain come under attack from an unknown...

Brideshead Revisited Trailer

Brideshead Revisited Trailer

Watch the trailer for Brideshead RevisitedBrideshead Revisited is a period drama set in a pre-war...

Festival In Cannes Movie Review

Festival In Cannes Movie Review

Attending a film festival is a remarkable experience. For a few solid days, a...

The Red Violin Movie Review

The Red Violin Movie Review

Like a blending of great symphony and great cinema, "The Red Violin" is a magnum...

Beyond The Sea Movie Review

Beyond The Sea Movie Review

This Bobby Darin biopic reportedly spent about 20 years going through various drafts by...

Festival In Cannes Movie Review

Festival In Cannes Movie Review

Ten years ago Robert Altman's mordant Hollywood farce "The Player" premiered at the Cannes Film...

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