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Feast Of Love Review


Very Good
In Godard's Contempt, Michel Piccoli explains the depth of his love for Brigitte Bardot as "totally... tenderly... tragically." The characters in Robert Benton's autumnal meditation on the meaning of love, Feast of Love, all dive into love with blinders on like Piccoli, drowning in their own respective seas of love.

Bradley (Greg Kinnear) is an affable, eternally optimistic schlimazel who runs Jitters, a tiny coffee shop in an Oregon college town, a guy that burbles out statements like, "I think love is everything; the only meaning we have to this crazy dream." Bradley is so likeable and easygoing that he is ripe to be trampled upon by the love beast and he is. Twice. First, his wife Kathryn (Selma Blair) leaves him for another woman. He then falls head over heels in love with cool-drink-of-water real-estate agent Diana (Radha Mitchell), who ends up marrying Bradley, despite her continuing to engage in carnal relations with David (Billy Burke). Bradley relates his stretch of news from the lovelorn to his friend Harry (Morgan Freeman), Harry calmly telling Bradley, "At least this time it's with a guy."

Continue reading: Feast Of Love Review

Unknown Review


Very Good
The way it plays out is elegantly simple: Five men find themselves in a warehouse unsure of who they are or how they got there. One of the men is tied to a chair. One is handcuffed to a railing and has been shot in the shoulder. One has a broken nose. The remaining two are bruised and bloodied. The warehouse is secured with bulletproof glass and bars. It's in a desert somewhere. There is no hope of escape.

As the men talk memories filter back slowly: The man in the jean jacket (Jim Caviezel, Passion of the Christ) recalls a violent kidnapping, the man with the broken nose (Greg Kinnear) recalls running, the man in the rancher shirt (Barry Pepper) is sure he can only trust one of them. They cannot decide if they should free the bound man (Joe Pantoliano) or help the handcuffed man (Jeremy Sisto) who is barely conscious. These desperate men slowly come to the realization that they are all involved in a kidnapping that went horribly awry. The question is: Who are the kidnappers and who are the kidnapped?

Continue reading: Unknown Review

Little Miss Sunshine Review


Excellent
The most visited genre in film may be the family drama. It's probably popular to produce because it's something everyone can relate to - having a family with issues not fit for public consumption and seeing them resolved in two hours with some great acting thrown in for good measure, hopefully. Whether it's got some laughter during the course of events or not, it's getting quite difficult to come up with original ideas that force a family to change, or work together, or learn about each other, in an entertaining fashion.And now, here's Little Miss Sunshine. You're not quite sure what you're in for during the Sundance-touting trailer as you see snippets of a family dinner. You know they are going to be quirky, based on their remarks and the quick cuts. You also know the acting will be dependable because of the stellar cast, including Greg Kinnear, Toni Collette, and Alan Arkin. Plus, it's got a cute girl with glasses you know you're going to cheer on because the title is based on her.Combining these reliable creative forces with outstanding dialogue and appropriate timing, Little Miss Sunshine is an engaging experience. Co-directors Jonathan Dayton and Valerie Faris not only make a long dinner scene interesting, but an interminable drive through a visually boring landscape also never gets old.Little Miss Sunshine is the road trip story of how little seven-year-old Olive gets to a competition she's been trying to reach for years, the titular subject. Normally each member of the family has their own self-centered focus, but Olive's achievement of acceptance takes precedence and they pile into the car to spout wit aplenty and deal with themselves.Everyone has their own fault or weakness, of course, and each comes to light in its turn, with an intelligent grace instead of an easy resolution. For instance, when Richard's (Kinnear) book deal does not come across as planned, his verbally horny father (Arkin) gives a brief acknowledgement of his efforts, which is stilted due to lack of practice but no less sincere. Richard's response matches it, quietly but no less thankfully. The entire film has this wonderful balance of handling emotional issues without ever getting precious or melodramatic.Olive (Abigail Breslin) is thankfully not the perfect child, either. One of the first comments she makes is to her uncle, who recently attempted suicide (Steve Carell) because of an unrequited, homosexual, affair, which she calls silly. Also, instead of making her say something cute, she simply places her arm around her brother's shoulder to make him rejoin the family after an outburst.Little Miss Sunshine is enjoyable because it's moving without being pedantic, it's funny while being honest about how family members treat each other, and it takes everything about being human with a smart affection sorely lacking in current filmmaking.DVD extras include two commentary tracks, alternate endings, and a music video.You can steal her sunshine.

Fast Food Nation Review


Very Good
A few weeks ago, it was announced by McDonald's that it would be making an unprecedented push towards "class." Amongst other things, it will be installing wireless internet in a large amount of its restaurants and changing décor into a mellow, art-friendly utopia for college students. Basically, it's tired of Starbucks being the only double-edged sword in the drawer. Sounds nice, but these aesthetic changes won't matter much in the face of the horrors depicted in Richard Linklater's Fast Food Nation.

Adapted from the inadaptable investigative best-seller by Eric Schlosser, Fast Food Nation sets a whirlwind of brouhaha in a small Colorado town. The town in question, Cody, doesn't really exist but neither does the fast food chain that started there, Mickey's (God that sounds familiar). Mickey's flagship meal is The Big One, an extra-large patty processed and shipped at a local meatpacking plant that employs illegal aliens like young couple Sylvia (the excellent Catalina Sandino Moreno) and Raul (a shockingly restrained Wilmer Valderrama). The Big One was thought up by Mickey's marketing whiz-kid Don Henderson (Greg Kinnear), who has been sent to Cody to investigate a high amount of fecal matter being found in the product that made him a success.

Continue reading: Fast Food Nation Review

Auto Focus Review


OK
Making stories about celebrities who mess up their lives has become a kind of cottage industry these days. Tabloid magazines have thrived on it for years. The E! True Hollywood Story and Behind the Music have extended celeb-thrashing to TV.

Finally the big screen has embraced such tales, but Auto Focus proves, once again, there's too little tale in these stories to merit more than 15 minutes with Barbara Walters.

Continue reading: Auto Focus Review

Unknown Review


Very Good
The way it plays out is elegantly simple: Five men find themselves in a warehouse unsure of who they are or how they got there. One of the men is tied to a chair. One is handcuffed to a railing and has been shot in the shoulder. One has a broken nose. The remaining two are bruised and bloodied. The warehouse is secured with bulletproof glass and bars. It's in a desert somewhere. There is no hope of escape.

As the men talk memories filter back slowly: The man in the jean jacket (Jim Caviezel, Passion of the Christ) recalls a violent kidnapping, the man with the broken nose (Greg Kinnear) recalls running, the man in the rancher shirt (Barry Pepper) is sure he can only trust one of them. They cannot decide if they should free the bound man (Joe Pantoliano) or help the handcuffed man (Jeremy Sisto) who is barely conscious. These desperate men slowly come to the realization that they are all involved in a kidnapping that went horribly awry. The question is: Who are the kidnappers and who are the kidnapped?

Continue reading: Unknown Review

Fast Food Nation Review


Very Good
A few weeks ago, it was announced by McDonald's that it would be making an unprecedented push towards "class." Amongst other things, it will be installing wireless internet in a large amount of its restaurants and changing décor into a mellow, art-friendly utopia for college students. Basically, it's tired of Starbucks being the only double-edged sword in the drawer. Sounds nice, but these aesthetic changes won't matter much in the face of the horrors depicted in Richard Linklater's Fast Food Nation.

Adapted from the inadaptable investigative best-seller by Eric Schlosser, Fast Food Nation sets a whirlwind of brouhaha in a small Colorado town. The town in question, Cody, doesn't really exist but neither does the fast food chain that started there, Mickey's (God that sounds familiar). Mickey's flagship meal is The Big One, an extra-large patty processed and shipped at a local meatpacking plant that employs illegal aliens like young couple Sylvia (the excellent Catalina Sandino Moreno) and Raul (a shockingly restrained Wilmer Valderrama). The Big One was thought up by Mickey's marketing whiz-kid Don Henderson (Greg Kinnear), who has been sent to Cody to investigate a high amount of fecal matter being found in the product that made him a success.

Continue reading: Fast Food Nation Review

Invincible (2006) Review


Very Good
Following the disappointing 1975 season that saw the team finishing 4-10, the Philadelphia Eagles needed assistance and weren't picky about where the help would come from. In a move characterized as part desperation, part publicity stunt, the Eagles organization held open tryouts in the summer of '76. They attracted hundreds of overweight, under-qualified Philly fanatics and one unassuming NFL hopeful blessed with natural abilities.Invincible tells the predominantly true story of down-on-his-luck bartender Vince Papale (Mark Wahlberg), who attended the Eagles' free session and impressed newly appointed head football coach Dick Vermeil (Greg Kinnear). Reports vary, and some think Papale received a personal session with Vermeil based on his already decent play for the Philadelphia Bell of the World Football League, but either way, Papale eventually accepted an invitation to the Eagles' training camp and half expected to be cut after the first week. To his surprise - and to his jaded teammates' constant chagrin - Papale battled for a roster spot and provided the discouraged Eagles fan base with a reason to care about the battered franchise.Papale is the classic underdog, and first-time director Ericson Core takes the necessary steps to ensure that the film's hero ascends to his proper pedestal. A former cinematographer, Core pays special attention to the streets, alleys, and grimy watering holes of Philadelphia, knowing they add as much (if not more) to Papale's character as any conventional locker room chat. The blue-collar Invincible soaks up local flavor and sweats working-class determination. By including gratuitous shots of Papale jogging through his inner-city neighborhoods, Core clearly indicates his intentions to wrestle the title of Top Overachiever from Philly's other sports son, Rocky Balboa - and he temporarily succeeds, at least until Sylvester Stallone releases the sixth and final Rocky in December.About the only person not excited by Papale's remarkable rise is Wahlberg. Though physically prepared for the scruffy film's hard-hitting football sequences, Wahlberg brings a quarter of the energy and charm to scenes shared with his goombah pals and his beer-slinging, Giants-loving bartender gal (Elizabeth Banks). These characters could have been dismissed as cogs in the motivational movie machine, but writer Brad Gann goes to great lengths to illustrate how a labor strike hits these men harder than a linebacker. Papale provided these good-natured bums with an escape from their daily hardships. Wahlberg had an opportunity to channel that energy, yet even as Papale's fortunes turn, the actor's enthusiasm stays predominantly level.Wahlberg's even keel doesn't hinder Invincible, which still manages to be extremely likable despite its conventions. About the only people bound to find fault are die-hard Giants, Cowboys, and Redskins fans, all of whom will tire almost immediately of the film's unbridled Eagles adoration.You red dudes are goin' down!

The Matador Review


Excellent
Pierce Brosnan's chances of returning to the James Bond role officially plunge down the drain the minute he sashays his Speedo-clad frame across the screen with Margarita in hand for all of Mexico to see. It's one of many surprises that await you in The Matador, an immensely entertaining jaunt that's still seeking an audience after turning heads at the 2005 Sundance Film Festival.

The plot sounds like the beginning of a bad joke: A hit man with some time to kill between jobs strikes up a meaningless conversation with a tourist sitting near him at a Mexico City hotel bar. The characters come from different walks of life, but manage to find a connection that we as an audience can invest in.

Continue reading: The Matador Review

What Planet Are You From? Review


Weak
It's always a shame to see great comedic minds fall so far from the mark. Garry Shandling is a funny man. Just check out any episode of The Larry Sanders Show. He has a wonderfully dry wit and is downright hilarious without drawing overt attention to himself. I just want to know what the hell happened to What Planet are You From?

Simple story line: Alien must come to Earth and impregnate female human being to establish future dominance of his planet's race. Comedic premise: Alien must learn how to communicate to female human beings. Comedy rolls on: Alien encounters and makes ass of himself to female human beings. Comedy continues: Alien tracked by rogue FAA agent. Comedy continues even more: Alien meets female human and falls in love. Cue drama. That's about it.

Continue reading: What Planet Are You From? Review

Dinner With Friends Review


Good
Ten minutes with Toni Collette's Beth and you'll understand why her husband (Greg Kinnear) wants to be rid of her. As an adult drama, Dinner With Friends is apt enough at exploring late-thirtysomething angst and crisis, well acting and paced with enough momentum to keep the story from dragging. Too bad the emotion is all on the surface, making it difficult to identify with any of the characters in a positive way.

As Good As It Gets Review


Excellent
Some of the most memorable one-liners of the year, Jack Nicholson's best role since Chinatown, Greg Kinnear's best role since... well, since ever, and a story I think we can all relate to - what does As Good As It Gets not have?

Aside from a few quibbles, As Good As It Gets really stands out as one of the year's best films. Mark Nicholson down for a well-deserved Oscar. In fact, just watching him do two hours of his irredeemable Melvin by himself would be a treat. Match him up with a fine supporting cast, and it's golden.

Continue reading: As Good As It Gets Review

Stuck On You Review


Excellent
Delicately splicing sentiment with sharp wit, Stuck On You follows the eclectic adventures of Walt (Greg Kinnear) and Bob (Matt Damon), conjoined brothers who are extremely distinct personalities. One wants to flip burgers in his hometown restaurant, while the other wants to take a shot at Hollywood after performing in community theater for a decade. With the inspired gusto that comes from refusing to let any challenge overtake you, the linked pair head out to Studioland so that Walt can at least take a shot at the big time before he looks too old to do so - as Bob was born with most of their liver, Walt's growth seems to physically surpass his.

While that's an easy excuse (and not the only contrivance) to get over the first aesthetics presented of the lead characters, Stuck On You intelligently concentrates on the relationship of the brothers throughout. Though multiple plot coincidences might be thrown in their path, their interaction is rewarding to watch as they progress through a parody of stardom due to their unique situation. No matter which of their needs the other is helping to fulfill, there is a basic, innate sense that the other half is just as important without overwhelming you with cheap, sentimental dialogue. When Walt's career is taking center focus, the quiet maturity of Bob's responses and questions is given just as much time to resonate.

Continue reading: Stuck On You Review

Loser Review


OK
If you're a cynic, you might wonder when Amy Heckerling (director of the utterly vapid Clueless) lost touch with the youth of America. I'm inclined to believe it was in 1982, right after the release of Fast Times at Ridgemont High, her only good movie, which she made when she was only 28.

Now in her mid-forties, it's rather depressing to see Heckerling using the same jokes that worked almost two decades ago. And for a movie that uses "Dare to be different" as its tagline, it's almost pathetic that this story is lifted virtually verbatim from Fast Times, with the Mark Ratner-Stacy Hamilton romance going awry once again. Brian Backer, who starred as Ratner, is even back in a small role.

Continue reading: Loser Review

Bad News Bears Review


Bad
When a movie this awful tosses the adjective "bad" into its title, we call it truth in advertising. Look beyond the easy-target moniker and you'll find even more bad news: Richard Linklater's remake of Michael Ritchie's misfits-on-the-mound classic is a major league disappointment, a mean-spirited, insensitive, and racist misfire that should have Walter Matthau and original Bad News Bears screenwriter Bill Lancaster spinning in their graves.

Linklater scored critical praise for his similarly paced School of Rock, and makes only slight alterations to the slacker-mentors-kids formula in hopes of duplicating his success. His cringeworthy Bears places former major league pitcher Morris Buttermaker (Billy Bob Thornton) in charge of a scornful army of selfish brats, then marches them through conventional hurdles on the way to a preposterous championship game.

Continue reading: Bad News Bears Review

Someone Like You Review


Very Good
Based on the Laura Zigman novel, Animal Husbandry, Someone Like You is a romantic comedy about a late night TV talent coordinator named Jane (Ashley Judd), whose luck in love is predictably bad. So predictable is her misfortune, in fact, that she has devised a pervasive theory on the subject, revolving around the notion that men are like cattle.

When she meets her show's new executive, Ray (Kinnear, You've Got Mail), however, her luck -- she thinks -- begins to change. But Ray, she discovers, is just a typical bull, looking to spread his seed in wider pastures. And it's not until he dumps her for his ex-girlfriend that she realizes the true depth of her plight. Jane, it seems, is an old cow. And Ray is looking for a new cow. This joke more or less carries the film, and -- though interesting at first -- it gets old after its twentieth or fiftieth appearance in the script.

Continue reading: Someone Like You Review

Mystery Men Review


Very Good
"Hey now, you're an all-star, get your game on, go play..." then sit back and watch America's newest superheroes screw up, in this summer's new comedy, Mystery Men. In this Tim Burtonesque film by Kinka Usher, a ragtag band of superheroes set out to rescue Captain Amazing (a Superman comparable played by Greg Kinear) from the evil clutches of the criminal mastermind, Cassanova Frankenstein (Geoffrey Rush).

Mystery Men is one of the funniest films I've seen all year. It combines the hilarious randomness of films like Austin Powers: The Spy Who Shagged Me, with a satirical twist that today's audiences are sure to appreciate. Now don't get me wrong, Mystery Men is no masterpiece, but it made me laugh (a lot) and that's what the film is about. Mystery Men scores high in all areas. It has an entirely kooky and original plot fueled by crack up dialogue, mesmerizing scenery, (which is reminiscent of the Batman movies) and an awesome cast.

Continue reading: Mystery Men Review

Auto Focus Review


OK
Making stories about celebrities who mess up their lives has become a kind of cottage industry these days. Tabloid magazines have thrived on it for years. The E! True Hollywood Story and Behind the Music have extended celeb-thrashing to TV.

Finally the big screen has embraced such tales, but Auto Focus proves, once again, there's too little tale in these stories to merit more than 15 minutes with Barbara Walters.

Continue reading: Auto Focus Review

Bad News Bears Review


Weak
When the executives at Paramount Pictures saw Billy BobThornton play a bitter, abusive, drunkard shopping-mall Kris Kringle in2003's raunchy, bitingly funny "BadSanta," they must have said to themselves,"If we water this down to a PG-13, we'll make a mint!"

Thus was born the lackluster remake of 1976's "TheBad News Bears."

Once an edgy but family-friendly Little League comedy fullof cursing pre-pubescent underdogs and starring Walter Matthau as theirbooze-hound coach, this 2005 version -- starring Thornton, co-written by"Bad Santa" screenwriters, and lazily directed by the usuallycreative Richard Linklater -- has lost both its bite and its heart.

Thornton's uncharacteristically flat take on the characterof coach Walter Buttermaker -- a trailer-park bum and exterminator by tradewho once played half an inning in the pros -- has little of Matthau's cantankeroushound-dog congeniality. His "who cares" attitude toward his baseballteam of delinquents, nerds, over-eaters, immigrants and paraplegics soonbecomes humorously motivational abuse, then "win at all costs"obsessiveness, then "just have fun out there" altruism withoutmuch rationale beyond the screenplay's say-so.

Continue reading: Bad News Bears Review

Robots Review


OK

With its expensive but largely characterless voice castand an off-the-shelf follow-your-dreams plot retooled for a world populatedby wacky sentient machines, the computer-animated "Robots" islucky to have spectacular production design and one or two curious mechanicalstars to hold the interest of anyone over age 10.

Created by Blue Sky Studios and director Chris Wedge --the gang behind 2002's "IceAge" -- the story concerns young robotRodney Copperbottom (voiced by Ewan McGregor), a small-town dreamer madefrom well-worn, hand-me-down parts maintained by his dishwasher dad. He'sa hopeful, wide-eyed inventor who travels to the mega-opolis Robot Cityhoping to sell some of his scrap-metal gadgets to Bigweld Industries, apparentlythe monopoly supplier of all things robotic in this world.

The company was once run by the altruistic and welcomingMr. Bigweld (Mel Brooks), who for no adequately explored reason has withdrawnfrom the company he loved and let it be taken over by a greedy, brushed-steelcorporate suit named Ratchet (Greg Kinnear). This villain has decided todiscontinue all replacement parts Bigweld has always made for the robotpopulation -- all part of a sinister plan to scrap and melt down any "outmodes"who can't afford full-body upgrades.

Continue reading: Robots Review

Someone Like You Review


Good

What's this? An authentically human romantic comedy without any sign of two-dimensional stereotypes, nose-crinkling cute stock sweethearts or broadly farcical emotional retards? Well, beat me with a valentine! Who'd have thunk it.

At first glance, "Someone Like You" may look like a formulaic chick flick about a pert, 30-ish career gal (Ashley Judd) who moves in with a womanizing wolf of a co-worker (Hugh Jackman) after being dumped by her boyfriend (Greg Kinnear). But the people that populate this picture are refreshingly genuine and multifaceted, with understandable motives and tangible feelings.

Sure Roy (Kinnear) dumps Jane (Judd) just before they're about to move in together and just after her apartment has been rented to someone else. But he's not just an insensitive jerk toying with her heart. He got spooked by the speed of their relationship (they'd only been going out six weeks) and he'd left another woman for her. The guy is genuinely torn, wracked with doubts and guilt.

Continue reading: Someone Like You Review

Mystery Men Review


Weak

If nothing else, "Mystery Men," a chaff on the "Batman"-style event movie, has impeccable timing. The unbridled superhero genre has never been more ripe for spoofing, and this picture has an superior satirical pedigree, what with its cast that includes those hippest heir apparents of comedy royalty, Ben Stiller and Janeane Garofalo.

Adapted from the Dark Horse comic book of the same name, the movie's protagonists are a sad sack band of part-time, wannabes heroes with monikers like The Shoveler (mild-mannered William H. Macy, donning a golden spade); the silverware-wielding Blue Raja (Hank Azaria, in a bad fortune-teller get-up); the Invisible Boy (Kel Mitchell), whose powers only work when no one is looking; The Spleen (Paul Rubens of "Pee-Wee" fame), who boasts near-lethal flatulence; The Bowler (Garofalo), whose translucent, supernatural ball contains her dead daddy's skull; and Mr. Furious (Stiller), whose alleged power is his violent and very short temper.

These not-so-super friends are called into action when Champion City's real savior -- a corporate sellout called Captain Amazing (a superbly conceited Greg Kinnear), whose rubbery costume is plastered with more ads than NASCAR jumpsuit -- is captured by the wildly nefarious, feral-eyed and disco-lovin' baddie Casanova Frankenstein (Geoffrey Rush, on an all-you-can-eat scenery diet).

Continue reading: Mystery Men Review

We Were Soldiers Review


Good

Mel Gibson plays yet another idealized and idealistic father-of-five war hero, bursting at the seams with charge-leading integrity in "We Were Soldiers," a detailed and staggering account of the first harrowing battle of the Vietnam War.

This may sound like a bit much to take so soon after he single-handedly vanquished the British as a choleric colonial in "The Patriot." But Gibson is well cast in this far heavier and historically accurate picture that only falls back on hackneyed Hollywoodisms when it takes a break from the battlefield (and that isn't very often).

Gibson stars as Lt. Col. Hal Moore, the man who reluctantly but boldly lead the first American ground troops into the Ia Drang Valley on November 14, 1965 -- 11 years after the occupying French were trounced in the same location (as established in the film's brutal World War I-styled prologue).

Continue reading: We Were Soldiers Review

Loser Review


Zero

What's the world coming to when Amy Heckerling -- writer-director of "Fast Times at Ridgemont High" and "Clueless," and the one true comedic visionary of teen cinema -- is responsible for the most mundane, most out-of-touch college romance of the year?

"Loser" -- the title says it all -- is a milksop love story about a mollycoddle hayseed (Jason Biggs, "American Pie") going off the school in the big city, falling meekly in love with a spunky, punky co-ed with raccoon eyeliner and low self-esteem (Mena Suvari, "American Beauty"), and becoming her pathetic puppy dog while she debases herself in an affair with a manipulative professor (Greg Kinnear).

He's a doormat without an iota of personality, but we're supposed to like him because he's earnest and feel sorry for him because his ruthlessly incisive, party dude roommates take advantage of his friendlessness and naiveté.

Continue reading: Loser Review

The Gift Review


Weak

Warning: This review begins with a wildly off-subject tangent.

O, woe! What hope can we have for director Sam Raimi's 2002 "Spider-Man" movie now that he has made two utterly conventional Hollywood flicks in a row?

Once a tongue-in-cheek sovereign of campy cult classics like "Evil Dead 2," "Darkman" and "The Quick and the Dead" -- not to mention the producer of TV's uber-campy "Xena" -- Raimi went straight two years ago with the chilling psychological thriller "A Simple Plan." Then last year he went soft with "For Love of the Game," a middling, maudlin baseball romance starring Kevin Costner.

Continue reading: The Gift Review

Nurse Betty Review


Good

Heretofore known for his viciously incisive, very black socio-sexual satires, director Neil LaBute takes a joyride in antic comedy territory with "Nurse Betty." It's charming effort of pure entertainment about a gentle, bouncy Kansas waitress who becomes convinced she's a part of her favorite soap opera after being sent into post-traumatic shock by witnessing a murder.

The murder was that of her abusive, redneck husband (LaBute regular Aaron Eckhart in another amazing chameleon performance) -- a retribution for a shady business deal gone wrong.

The waitress, Betty Sizemore, is the kind of bona fide wide-eyed innocent most Hollywood actresses wouldn't be able to play without slipping into a hammy, ignorant hayseed routine and winking ironically at the audience. But in the hands of Renée Zellweger -- who proved her sweetheart credibility in "Jerry Maguire" -- Betty is 100 percent genuine sugar.

Continue reading: Nurse Betty Review

Greg Kinnear

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Greg Kinnear

Date of birth

17th June, 1963

Occupation

Actor

Sex

Male

Height

1.76


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Greg Kinnear Movies

Brigsby Bear Movie Review

Brigsby Bear Movie Review

Director Dave McCary makes a superb feature debut with this offbeat black comedy, which explores...

Same Kind Of Different As Me [2017] Trailer

Same Kind Of Different As Me [2017] Trailer

When Deborah Hall (Renée Zellweger) has a dream about a poor wise man and ends...

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Brigsby Bear Trailer

Brigsby Bear Trailer

When James Pope was just a baby, he was kidnapped from the hospital in which...

Little Men Trailer

Little Men Trailer

After the death of his father, Brian, Kathy and their son Jake move into a...

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Heaven Is For Real Trailer

Heaven Is For Real Trailer

Todd Burpo has a fulfilling career as a businessman, fire fighter and pastor in a...

Anchorman 2: The Legend Continues Movie Review

Anchorman 2: The Legend Continues Movie Review

It's been nearly 10 years since we first met Ron Burgundy, and this sequel is...

Anchorman 2: The Legend Continues Trailer

Anchorman 2: The Legend Continues Trailer

The legend of San Diego's Channel 4 news team may have long since dissolved over...

Anchorman 2: The Legend Continues - International Trailer Trailer

Anchorman 2: The Legend Continues - International Trailer Trailer

The news used to be a noble profession before the likes of Ron Burgundy with...

Anchorman 2: The Legend Continues - Horsepower Clip Trailer

Anchorman 2: The Legend Continues - Horsepower Clip Trailer

Ron Burgundy compares a Dodge Durango's horsepower to that of an actually horse before insulting...

Anchorman 2 Trailer

Anchorman 2 Trailer

Ron Burgundy, Brian Fantana, Brick Tamland and Champ Kind have now hit the eighties and...

Stuck in Love Movie Review

Stuck in Love Movie Review

Far too tidy to be believable, this multi-strand romance holds our attention with a warmly...

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