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Little Men Trailer


After the death of his father, Brian, Kathy and their son Jake move into a building they inherited. The building is already inhabited by Leonor and her son Jake who rent the shop at the front and the apartment at the back. Jake and Tony soon become friends, they're both into different things but they bond nevertheless.

Jake has always been a bit of a loner and his mum and dad are both glad that Jake finally seems to have a good friend. Each person in the building has their own personal struggles, Leonor's business is quiet and lives apart from her husband whilst Kathy is the main provider for the Jardine family - Brian is a struggling stage actor whose wage doesn't go far enough to cover the family's finances. 

When the Jardine's learn that Leonor's rent is considerably under the average amount for the neighbourhood, they feel they have no other option but to increase the amount she pays. Leonor pleas for the Jardine's to be a little sympathetic to their cause and initially Brian allows her to continue renting the property but when his sister intervenes, he's left with no option but to evict Leonor and Jake.

Continue: Little Men Trailer

"Captain America" Trumps "Rio 2" At The Box Office, Superheroes And Religious Flicks Win The Game


Chris Evans Johnny Depp Greg Kinnear

Captain America: The Winter Soldier surprisingly came in first in the box office charts over Easter weekend, after toppling the predicted winner, Rio 2. This was Cap’s sixth outing and third weekend topping the chart. Starring Chris Evans, Samuel L. Jackson, Scarlett Johansson and Sebastian Stan, it made $26.2m (£15.5m), leaving the animated parrot love story in second place with $22,5 million, according to Box Office Mojo. Not a bad haul, but still not enough to topple the first Avenger. While The Winter Soldier and Rio 2 kept passing the ball around in the top spots, elsewhere in the chart things got a lot more interesting.

Chris Evans, Captain America: The Winter Soldier
Chris Evans as Cap had the hearts and wallets of moviegoers once again.

Heaven is for Real, the story of a young boy who claims to have visited heaven during a near-death experience, came out of nowhere to take number 3 over Easter weekend. The Sony production opened on Wednesday with $3.7 million, earning another $3.3m on Thursday and now scored $21.5 million over the Fri-Sun period. The surprise surge likely had a lot to do with the themes of the film. Heaven is a family-friendly, religious film, which centers on a young boy, who claims to have seen heaven during a near-death experience. Releasing it over Easter weekend seems like an obvious choice, and it obviously worked. Heaven blasted straight through Transcendence’s $11 million.

Continue reading: "Captain America" Trumps "Rio 2" At The Box Office, Superheroes And Religious Flicks Win The Game

Turns Out 'Heaven Is Real' - Real Bad. Critics Slate Greg Kinnear Drama


Greg Kinnear Kelly Reilly

It’s always a risk, taking a New York Times bestseller and adapting it for the silver screen. Heaven Is Real documents the near-death experience of a small child, who then recounts with startling detail seeing his sister – lost in a miscarriage – and grandfather, who died 30 years before he was born.

Greg KinnearGreg Kinnear at the 7th Annual Kidstock Music And Art Festival 

It’s an emotive story, and one that was ripe for a movie re-telling, but it would appear as though Randall Wallace (director) and Chris Parker (screenplay, co-written with others) haven’t been able to recreate whatever it was that made the preceding book so popular. 

Continue reading: Turns Out 'Heaven Is Real' - Real Bad. Critics Slate Greg Kinnear Drama

Stuck In Love Review


OK

Far too tidy to be believable, this multi-strand romance holds our attention with a warmly comical tone and a watchable cast. But it's only entertaining as a bit of escapism, because the various relational entanglements are far too contrived for us to identify with them. A looser, messier approach would have made it a lot more involving.

The action takes place over the course of a year. Bill (Kinnear) is a noted novelist who stopped writing when his marriage to Erica (Connelly) ended. Even though she's now married to a fitness instructor (Joiner), Bill is waiting for her to come back to him. Although he's engaging in a mindless fling with a married neighbour (Bell) in the mean time. Bill and Erica's daughter Samantha (Collins) has just published her first novel, but has sworn off romance. Then she meets the persistent nice-guy Lou (Lerman). Meanwhile, her teen brother Rusty (Wolff) is finally working up the nerve to speak to his crush Kate (Liberato), who has both a cocaine problem and a bully (Schwarzenegger) of a boyfriend.

Writer-director Boone lets each character introduce themselves with the first line from the book of their life, and the litrary theme continues in almost every scene as they continually discuss their writings and their favourite books. Very quickly, this begins to get on our nerves, as if Boone is reminding us that nothing we're watching is actually happening: it's carefully orchestrated fiction that draws on real-life emotions to tell a series of implausible love stories. Aside from Kinnear and Connelly, who are strong enough actors to convince us of almost anything, none of the interaction feels remotely realistic. 

Continue reading: Stuck In Love Review

A Week In Movies Feat: The Host, Trance And G.I. Joe: Retaliation Hit Cinemas While World War Z, The Brass Teapot And Hummingbird Trailers Emerge


Channing Tatum Saoirse Ronan Jake Abel Max Irons Greg Kinnear Brad Pitt Dwayne Johnson Jason Statham

G.I. Joe: Retaliation Review

This week's biggest global release is G.I. Joe: Retaliation, and critics were on edge at press screenings earlier in the week, hoping against hope that the sequel maintained the entertaining ironic subversiveness of the 2009 original, G.I. Joe: The Rise of Cobra. Alas, the news isn't good.

The week's other blockbuster is The Host, based on the novel by Twilight author Stephenie Meyers. Saoirse Ronan stars as Melanie, a young woman facing an alien force that's taking over humanity. In fine Twilight style, there are two leading men vying for her affections, played by rising-star hearthrobs Max Irons and Jake Abel. Despite good early word-of-mouth, the studio hasn't shown the film to critics.

Continue reading: A Week In Movies Feat: The Host, Trance And G.I. Joe: Retaliation Hit Cinemas While World War Z, The Brass Teapot And Hummingbird Trailers Emerge

Stuck In Love Trailer


William Borgens was once a highly regarded novelist, however after a heart-breaking divorce with his wife Erica who left him for a younger, more handsome man, he hasn't been able to write a single word. He just spends his days thinking about the time they had together and spying on them through their windows. His pretty friend-with-benefits, Tricia, who is also divorced, does her best with her sometimes overly honest opinions to force him to get back to dating. Meanwhile, his promiscuous and cynical daughter Samantha is having her first book published while struggling to come to terms with the idea of love and still refusing to speak to her mother after she left her father, and his son Rusty, who is also an aspiring writer, tries to show one troubled and vulnerable girl that he is the guy for her.

Continue: Stuck In Love Trailer

Greg Kinnear and Sarah Jessica Parker - Greg Kinnear and Sarah Jessica Parker New York City, USA - sharing a kiss on the set of 'I Don't Know How She Does It' filming in Manhattan Tuesday 22nd February 2011

Greg Kinnear and Sarah Jessica Parker
Greg Kinnear and Sarah Jessica Parker
Greg Kinnear and Sarah Jessica Parker
Greg Kinnear and Sarah Jessica Parker
Greg Kinnear and Sarah Jessica Parker
Greg Kinnear and Sarah Jessica Parker

The Last Song Trailer


Author Nicholas Sparks is certainly a popular man in Hollywood at the moment his hugely popular books Message in a Bottle, A Walk to Remember, The Notebook, Nights in Rodanthe and Dear John have all been turned into movies and now the latest addition to his catalogue The Last Song will receive the same treatment.

Continue: The Last Song Trailer

Green Zone Review


Extraordinary
Based on Rajiv Chandrasekaran's true account Imperial Life in the Emerald City, this film never pauses for breath throughout a story set in the weeks following the 2003 invasion of Baghdad. It's provocative, involving and utterly gripping.

Miller (Damon) is a military officer charged with locating weapons of mass destruction, but every site he visits is a dead end. When he voices doubts about the intelligence, he gets in trouble with the Pentagon chief (Kinnear).

On the other hand, the CIA director (Gleeson) is sympathetic, and encourages him to dig around. So with the help of a local translator (Abdalla), Miller dives in. And he's quickly caught between two factions in his own government as he searches for an Iraqi general (Naor) in hiding.

Continue reading: Green Zone Review

Greg Kinnear Thursday 28th January 2010 Calvin Klein Collection & Los Angeles Nomadic Division (LAND) 1st Annual Celebration For L.A. Arts Monthly and Art Los Angeles Contemporary (ALAC) - Arrivals Los Angeles, California

Greg Kinnear
Greg Kinnear
Greg Kinnear

Greg Kinnear - Saturday 21st November 2009 at Kodak Theatre Hollywood, California

Greg Kinnear
Greg Kinnear

Flash Of Genius Trailer


Watch the trailer for Flash Of Genius

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Greg Kinnear - Greg Kinnear and wife Los Angeles, California - The 20th Annual Producers Guild Awards held at the Hollywood Palladium - Arrivals Friday 23rd January 2009

Greg Kinnear

Little Miss Sunshine Review


Excellent
The most visited genre in film may be the family drama. It's probably popular to produce because it's something everyone can relate to - having a family with issues not fit for public consumption and seeing them resolved in two hours with some great acting thrown in for good measure, hopefully. Whether it's got some laughter during the course of events or not, it's getting quite difficult to come up with original ideas that force a family to change, or work together, or learn about each other, in an entertaining fashion.

And now, here's Little Miss Sunshine. You're not quite sure what you're in for during the Sundance-touting trailer as you see snippets of a family dinner. You know they are going to be quirky, based on their remarks and the quick cuts. You also know the acting will be dependable because of the stellar cast, including Greg Kinnear, Toni Collette, and Alan Arkin. Plus, it's got a cute girl with glasses you know you're going to cheer on because the title is based on her.

Continue reading: Little Miss Sunshine Review

Flash Of Genius Review


Very Good
Did you ever wonder who fine-tuned the technology behind the intermittent windshield wiper?

Neither did I until I caught Marc Abraham's Flash of Genius, a sober biopic with a surprisingly destructive core that recounts how casual inventor Bob Kearns deciphered how one could pause a perpetually sweeping wiper blade, then fought the Ford Motor Company for proper credit.

Continue reading: Flash Of Genius Review

Ghost Town Review


Weak

If you want to make money, you go to David Koepp. Three of the 20 films he has written are on the top 25 highest-grossing American box office list and another two show up in the top 100. The man makes hits and, most of the time anyways, they are well-written and focused scripts that attempt to keep exposition to a minimum. These are the traits of a very talented screenwriter... but unfortunately they do not necessarily translate into a positive resume for a feature film director.

Ghost Town is Koepp's fourth film as a director and it is the first film to feature UK comedian Ricky Gervais in a starring role. It tells the story of a dentist named Bertram Pincus (Gervais) who wakes from a friendly colonoscopy with the ability to see and hear the dead. It is inferred that this Shyamalanian gift was caused by a seven-minute interval during his operation where he died due to a two-strikes-already anesthesiologist. Ghosts of every color and creed begin hassling the chronically-introverted Pincus for favors, the leader of which seems to be Frank (Greg Kinnear).

A tux-donning victim of a high-speed Manhattan bus, Frank promises to get the other ghosts to leave if Bertram will help him derail his widow's pending nuptials. Turns out Frank's widow, Gwen (Téa Leoni), has been snubbed by Pincus on a dozen occasions (they live in the same apartment building), and her fiancé (Billy Campbell) is a civil-rights attorney. Not the easiest assignment for Pincus. But when the dentist helps crack the autopsy of a long-dead Egyptian king that Gwen is studying, she invites him to dinner, Pincus makes her laugh, and the end is already in sight. Morals are dished out on the side when Pincus agrees to help some other ghosts settle their unfinished business and there's also some stuff about "a life lived for others" passed on by a fellow dentist (Aasif Mandvi).

Much like the recent Hamlet 2, most of the film's success rides on the comic inventiveness of its star, and in this he is given little support from his director/screenwriter. At first, Gervais seems completely up to the task, employing the cracker-dry wit that made him such a phenomenon on the BBC version of The Office, the show he created and wrote with partner Stephen Merchant. There is a bright moment of hope as he has a particularly sharp exchange with Kristen Wiig of Saturday Night Live fame, who plays his surgeon. But then he script quickly shifts into standard operating procedure and comedy is swallowed by template.

Ghost Town has a smidgen more class than most contemporary romantic comedies but it is seemingly unaware of its strengths. Gervais' interplay with Leoni has a brisk charm to it but it seems too-often rushed and stuffed with jokes about dog poop, Chinese names, and naked ghosts, all of which seem out of place and drawn out. Egregiously over-sentimentalized, the last 30 minutes of the film rush through a half-dozen major conflicts in a mad dash to build to a predictable emotional climax. It's a total con and it sells Gervais' tremendous abilities up the river. Koepp's talents at structure falter slightly here, adding a few too many storylines than he seems capable of handling. Will Ghost Town make money? Probably, but it's the kind of film that gives box-office rankings a bad name.

My sinuses....

Baby Mama Review


Terrible
Ah, the infant: cinema's biological cure-all. Give a movie a messed up couple with a mountain of problems, or a young woman working on several self-esteem issues, and watch as reproduction works its zygote-induced magic. From She's Having a Baby to Parenthood, Juno to Knocked Up, pregnancy and all the surrounding hormonal hoopla supposedly symbolizes life celebrating itself. In the new Tina Fey comedy Baby Mama, it's just a manipulative means to a grossly unfunny end.

Super career-woman Kate Holbrook (Fey) has it all -- the ear of her wingnut organic foods tycoon Barry (Steve Martin), a cushy vice-presidency, and a fab-o apartment in Philadelphia. All she lacks is a genetic duplicate of her own professional perfection. Sadly, her internal lady parts can't supply a womb with a view. After trying every available procedure, she resorts to hiring a surrogate. After some bun in the oven bartering with baby broker Chaffee Bicknell (Sigourney Weaver), Holbrook meets Angie Ostrowiski (Amy Poehler), a working class gal with a white trash persona and a heart as large as a Big Gulp. When things go awry in her relationship, she moves in with Holbrook. Middling hijinx ensue.

Continue reading: Baby Mama Review

Greg Kinnear Saturday 20th October 2007 reading the New York Times during a break from filming his new movie New York City, USA

Greg Kinnear
Greg Kinnear
Greg Kinnear
Greg Kinnear
Greg Kinnear
Greg Kinnear

Greg Kinnear Wednesday 17th October 2007 Greg Kinnear filming on the movie set of 'Ghost Town' New York City, USA

Greg Kinnear
Greg Kinnear and Director David Koepp Filming On The Movie Set Of 'ghost Town'
Greg Kinnear and Director David Koepp Filming On The Movie Set Of 'ghost Town'
Greg Kinnear and Director David Koepp Filming On The Movie Set Of 'ghost Town'
Greg Kinnear and Director David Koepp Filming On The Movie Set Of 'ghost Town'
Greg Kinnear and Director David Koepp Filming On The Movie Set Of 'ghost Town'

Greg Kinnear Tuesday 16th October 2007 Project A.L.S. 'Tomorrow Is Tonight' 10th Anniversary Celebration, held at Waldorf Astoria Hotel New York City, USA

Greg Kinnear
Greg Kinnear

Feast Of Love Review


Very Good
In Godard's Contempt, Michel Piccoli explains the depth of his love for Brigitte Bardot as "totally... tenderly... tragically." The characters in Robert Benton's autumnal meditation on the meaning of love, Feast of Love, all dive into love with blinders on like Piccoli, drowning in their own respective seas of love.

Bradley (Greg Kinnear) is an affable, eternally optimistic schlimazel who runs Jitters, a tiny coffee shop in an Oregon college town, a guy that burbles out statements like, "I think love is everything; the only meaning we have to this crazy dream." Bradley is so likeable and easygoing that he is ripe to be trampled upon by the love beast and he is. Twice. First, his wife Kathryn (Selma Blair) leaves him for another woman. He then falls head over heels in love with cool-drink-of-water real-estate agent Diana (Radha Mitchell), who ends up marrying Bradley, despite her continuing to engage in carnal relations with David (Billy Burke). Bradley relates his stretch of news from the lovelorn to his friend Harry (Morgan Freeman), Harry calmly telling Bradley, "At least this time it's with a guy."

Continue reading: Feast Of Love Review

Unknown Review


Very Good
The way it plays out is elegantly simple: Five men find themselves in a warehouse unsure of who they are or how they got there. One of the men is tied to a chair. One is handcuffed to a railing and has been shot in the shoulder. One has a broken nose. The remaining two are bruised and bloodied. The warehouse is secured with bulletproof glass and bars. It's in a desert somewhere. There is no hope of escape.

As the men talk memories filter back slowly: The man in the jean jacket (Jim Caviezel, Passion of the Christ) recalls a violent kidnapping, the man with the broken nose (Greg Kinnear) recalls running, the man in the rancher shirt (Barry Pepper) is sure he can only trust one of them. They cannot decide if they should free the bound man (Joe Pantoliano) or help the handcuffed man (Jeremy Sisto) who is barely conscious. These desperate men slowly come to the realization that they are all involved in a kidnapping that went horribly awry. The question is: Who are the kidnappers and who are the kidnapped?

Continue reading: Unknown Review

Little Miss Sunshine Review


Excellent
The most visited genre in film may be the family drama. It's probably popular to produce because it's something everyone can relate to - having a family with issues not fit for public consumption and seeing them resolved in two hours with some great acting thrown in for good measure, hopefully. Whether it's got some laughter during the course of events or not, it's getting quite difficult to come up with original ideas that force a family to change, or work together, or learn about each other, in an entertaining fashion.And now, here's Little Miss Sunshine. You're not quite sure what you're in for during the Sundance-touting trailer as you see snippets of a family dinner. You know they are going to be quirky, based on their remarks and the quick cuts. You also know the acting will be dependable because of the stellar cast, including Greg Kinnear, Toni Collette, and Alan Arkin. Plus, it's got a cute girl with glasses you know you're going to cheer on because the title is based on her.Combining these reliable creative forces with outstanding dialogue and appropriate timing, Little Miss Sunshine is an engaging experience. Co-directors Jonathan Dayton and Valerie Faris not only make a long dinner scene interesting, but an interminable drive through a visually boring landscape also never gets old.Little Miss Sunshine is the road trip story of how little seven-year-old Olive gets to a competition she's been trying to reach for years, the titular subject. Normally each member of the family has their own self-centered focus, but Olive's achievement of acceptance takes precedence and they pile into the car to spout wit aplenty and deal with themselves.Everyone has their own fault or weakness, of course, and each comes to light in its turn, with an intelligent grace instead of an easy resolution. For instance, when Richard's (Kinnear) book deal does not come across as planned, his verbally horny father (Arkin) gives a brief acknowledgement of his efforts, which is stilted due to lack of practice but no less sincere. Richard's response matches it, quietly but no less thankfully. The entire film has this wonderful balance of handling emotional issues without ever getting precious or melodramatic.Olive (Abigail Breslin) is thankfully not the perfect child, either. One of the first comments she makes is to her uncle, who recently attempted suicide (Steve Carell) because of an unrequited, homosexual, affair, which she calls silly. Also, instead of making her say something cute, she simply places her arm around her brother's shoulder to make him rejoin the family after an outburst.Little Miss Sunshine is enjoyable because it's moving without being pedantic, it's funny while being honest about how family members treat each other, and it takes everything about being human with a smart affection sorely lacking in current filmmaking.DVD extras include two commentary tracks, alternate endings, and a music video.You can steal her sunshine.

Fast Food Nation Review


Very Good
A few weeks ago, it was announced by McDonald's that it would be making an unprecedented push towards "class." Amongst other things, it will be installing wireless internet in a large amount of its restaurants and changing décor into a mellow, art-friendly utopia for college students. Basically, it's tired of Starbucks being the only double-edged sword in the drawer. Sounds nice, but these aesthetic changes won't matter much in the face of the horrors depicted in Richard Linklater's Fast Food Nation.

Adapted from the inadaptable investigative best-seller by Eric Schlosser, Fast Food Nation sets a whirlwind of brouhaha in a small Colorado town. The town in question, Cody, doesn't really exist but neither does the fast food chain that started there, Mickey's (God that sounds familiar). Mickey's flagship meal is The Big One, an extra-large patty processed and shipped at a local meatpacking plant that employs illegal aliens like young couple Sylvia (the excellent Catalina Sandino Moreno) and Raul (a shockingly restrained Wilmer Valderrama). The Big One was thought up by Mickey's marketing whiz-kid Don Henderson (Greg Kinnear), who has been sent to Cody to investigate a high amount of fecal matter being found in the product that made him a success.

Continue reading: Fast Food Nation Review

Auto Focus Review


OK
Making stories about celebrities who mess up their lives has become a kind of cottage industry these days. Tabloid magazines have thrived on it for years. The E! True Hollywood Story and Behind the Music have extended celeb-thrashing to TV.

Finally the big screen has embraced such tales, but Auto Focus proves, once again, there's too little tale in these stories to merit more than 15 minutes with Barbara Walters.

Continue reading: Auto Focus Review

Unknown Review


Very Good
The way it plays out is elegantly simple: Five men find themselves in a warehouse unsure of who they are or how they got there. One of the men is tied to a chair. One is handcuffed to a railing and has been shot in the shoulder. One has a broken nose. The remaining two are bruised and bloodied. The warehouse is secured with bulletproof glass and bars. It's in a desert somewhere. There is no hope of escape.

As the men talk memories filter back slowly: The man in the jean jacket (Jim Caviezel, Passion of the Christ) recalls a violent kidnapping, the man with the broken nose (Greg Kinnear) recalls running, the man in the rancher shirt (Barry Pepper) is sure he can only trust one of them. They cannot decide if they should free the bound man (Joe Pantoliano) or help the handcuffed man (Jeremy Sisto) who is barely conscious. These desperate men slowly come to the realization that they are all involved in a kidnapping that went horribly awry. The question is: Who are the kidnappers and who are the kidnapped?

Continue reading: Unknown Review

Fast Food Nation Review


Very Good
A few weeks ago, it was announced by McDonald's that it would be making an unprecedented push towards "class." Amongst other things, it will be installing wireless internet in a large amount of its restaurants and changing décor into a mellow, art-friendly utopia for college students. Basically, it's tired of Starbucks being the only double-edged sword in the drawer. Sounds nice, but these aesthetic changes won't matter much in the face of the horrors depicted in Richard Linklater's Fast Food Nation.

Adapted from the inadaptable investigative best-seller by Eric Schlosser, Fast Food Nation sets a whirlwind of brouhaha in a small Colorado town. The town in question, Cody, doesn't really exist but neither does the fast food chain that started there, Mickey's (God that sounds familiar). Mickey's flagship meal is The Big One, an extra-large patty processed and shipped at a local meatpacking plant that employs illegal aliens like young couple Sylvia (the excellent Catalina Sandino Moreno) and Raul (a shockingly restrained Wilmer Valderrama). The Big One was thought up by Mickey's marketing whiz-kid Don Henderson (Greg Kinnear), who has been sent to Cody to investigate a high amount of fecal matter being found in the product that made him a success.

Continue reading: Fast Food Nation Review

Invincible (2006) Review


Very Good
Following the disappointing 1975 season that saw the team finishing 4-10, the Philadelphia Eagles needed assistance and weren't picky about where the help would come from. In a move characterized as part desperation, part publicity stunt, the Eagles organization held open tryouts in the summer of '76. They attracted hundreds of overweight, under-qualified Philly fanatics and one unassuming NFL hopeful blessed with natural abilities.Invincible tells the predominantly true story of down-on-his-luck bartender Vince Papale (Mark Wahlberg), who attended the Eagles' free session and impressed newly appointed head football coach Dick Vermeil (Greg Kinnear). Reports vary, and some think Papale received a personal session with Vermeil based on his already decent play for the Philadelphia Bell of the World Football League, but either way, Papale eventually accepted an invitation to the Eagles' training camp and half expected to be cut after the first week. To his surprise - and to his jaded teammates' constant chagrin - Papale battled for a roster spot and provided the discouraged Eagles fan base with a reason to care about the battered franchise.Papale is the classic underdog, and first-time director Ericson Core takes the necessary steps to ensure that the film's hero ascends to his proper pedestal. A former cinematographer, Core pays special attention to the streets, alleys, and grimy watering holes of Philadelphia, knowing they add as much (if not more) to Papale's character as any conventional locker room chat. The blue-collar Invincible soaks up local flavor and sweats working-class determination. By including gratuitous shots of Papale jogging through his inner-city neighborhoods, Core clearly indicates his intentions to wrestle the title of Top Overachiever from Philly's other sports son, Rocky Balboa - and he temporarily succeeds, at least until Sylvester Stallone releases the sixth and final Rocky in December.About the only person not excited by Papale's remarkable rise is Wahlberg. Though physically prepared for the scruffy film's hard-hitting football sequences, Wahlberg brings a quarter of the energy and charm to scenes shared with his goombah pals and his beer-slinging, Giants-loving bartender gal (Elizabeth Banks). These characters could have been dismissed as cogs in the motivational movie machine, but writer Brad Gann goes to great lengths to illustrate how a labor strike hits these men harder than a linebacker. Papale provided these good-natured bums with an escape from their daily hardships. Wahlberg had an opportunity to channel that energy, yet even as Papale's fortunes turn, the actor's enthusiasm stays predominantly level.Wahlberg's even keel doesn't hinder Invincible, which still manages to be extremely likable despite its conventions. About the only people bound to find fault are die-hard Giants, Cowboys, and Redskins fans, all of whom will tire almost immediately of the film's unbridled Eagles adoration.You red dudes are goin' down!

The Matador Review


Excellent
Pierce Brosnan's chances of returning to the James Bond role officially plunge down the drain the minute he sashays his Speedo-clad frame across the screen with Margarita in hand for all of Mexico to see. It's one of many surprises that await you in The Matador, an immensely entertaining jaunt that's still seeking an audience after turning heads at the 2005 Sundance Film Festival.

The plot sounds like the beginning of a bad joke: A hit man with some time to kill between jobs strikes up a meaningless conversation with a tourist sitting near him at a Mexico City hotel bar. The characters come from different walks of life, but manage to find a connection that we as an audience can invest in.

Continue reading: The Matador Review

What Planet Are You From? Review


Weak
It's always a shame to see great comedic minds fall so far from the mark. Garry Shandling is a funny man. Just check out any episode of The Larry Sanders Show. He has a wonderfully dry wit and is downright hilarious without drawing overt attention to himself. I just want to know what the hell happened to What Planet are You From?

Simple story line: Alien must come to Earth and impregnate female human being to establish future dominance of his planet's race. Comedic premise: Alien must learn how to communicate to female human beings. Comedy rolls on: Alien encounters and makes ass of himself to female human beings. Comedy continues: Alien tracked by rogue FAA agent. Comedy continues even more: Alien meets female human and falls in love. Cue drama. That's about it.

Continue reading: What Planet Are You From? Review

Nurse Betty Review


Excellent
Neil LaBute, best known for his ultra-dark comedies In the Company of Men and Your Friends and Neighbors, breaks from his traditional mold and lightens up a tad with Nurse Betty, which -- again -- isn't going to win any awards for sensitivity.

For the first time, LaBute is not directing from his own script, which might explain why, if I didn't know better, I would have sworn I was watching a Coen brothers movie. Who else would put a fantasy dancing sequence on the edge of the Grand Canyon at night?

Continue reading: Nurse Betty Review

We Were Soldiers Review


Good
Post September 11 cinema has seen its share of war movies designed to evoke and sustain a sense of American patriotism. In the last few months, we've re-visited the war in Kosovo (Behind Enemy Lines), the war in Somalia (Black Hawk Down), and most recently, World War II (Hart's War). We Were Soldiers is the latest in the onslaught, a story based on the true accounts of the first bloody battle of the Vietnam War. With so many war films recently released, We Were Soldiers has a difficult task as it tries to ride the patriotism express.

We Were Soldiers is based on the book We Were Soldiers Once...And Young written by Lieutenant Colonel Harold Moore and Joseph L. Galloway, the only journalist willing to go into the front lines to capture a first hand account of the war. In the film, Mel Gibson plays Harold Moore, a down-to-earth officer who is responsible for leading a group of innocent, naive young men into the area of Vietnam known as "The Valley of Death." But not soon after Lt. Col. Moore and his troops touch down, their position is compromised and they find themselves outnumbered almost 5 to 1. The American soldiers engage in a deadly battle for control of the area.

Continue reading: We Were Soldiers Review

The Gift (2000) Review


Weak
Maybe Paramount held back on giving The Gift a wide release during the Christmas season to avoid too many reviewers saying, "This Gift is a holiday lump of coal..." or something like that. If so, good call.

The latest from Sam Raimi (For Love of the Game) is a muddled thriller, filled with tired clichés and some of the worst casting in years. Raimi, along with screenwriters Billy Bob Thornton and Tom Epperson, try so hard to create a "serious" psychic chiller that the film is practically drained of any excitement.

Continue reading: The Gift (2000) Review

You've Got Mail Review


Terrible
What a complete waste of time. Honestly, I can't remember the last time I saw a movie where it caused such a painful experience. It was so bad that during the last half-hour I fell asleep. Luckily my friends were there to wake me up. Why is this happening anymore? I know people still have faith in the romantic-comedy genre but this is really ridiculous. Taking the same story and molding it a little different each time isn't fun to watch anymore.

You've Got Mail is about a woman named Kathleen Kelly (Meg Ryan), who's children's book store is in danger of being put out of business because of a new Barnes and Noble type book super store, owned by Joe Fox (Tom Hanks). When they meet each other they (of course) hate each other. What's the problem? They don't know that the other one is their favorite e-mail buddy. The premise is actually creative but they don't do anything with it. Hanks and Ryan have the unnecessary romances with Parker Posey and Greg Kinnear at the beginning, but the audience knows better. We know they're going to be history in about forty-five minutes. Bored yet?

Continue reading: You've Got Mail Review

Godsend Review


Weak
Watching Godsend compares to eating a gallon of fudge-filled chocolate ice cream minutes before going to bed. You know it's bad for you, but the experience is tons of fun. Soon enough, though, the gooey dessert stops tasting so good. By the time you near the bottom of the container, you can't even justify why you continue to swallow spoonfuls, but you keep eating despite the fact that it doesn't make sense to continue.

That also explains director Nick Hamm's jackhammer approach to his material. He knows he's working with a cheesy campfire story, the kind best whispered to terrified boy scouts in the dead of night. But he's sadly unaware of when enough is enough, and his final act becomes a series of ludicrous scientific explanations offset by cheap jolts to our nervous system.

Continue reading: Godsend Review

What Planet Are You From? Review


Bad

A comedian whose schtick has always been his acute social-sexual dysfunction, in "What Planet Are You From?" Garry Shandling is nothing if not well-cast as an alien packed off to Earth by his neutered, all-male race to impregnate an earth female as a prelude to invasion.

Given a crash course in inept pick-up lines and fitted with a motorized prosthetic penis that hums when he's aroused, Shandling is transported to the privy of a passenger jet and emerges to piggishly proposition stewardesses and every other female in sight, in what has to be the most awkwardly sexist comedy since the 1960s.

Populated by fundamentally unlikable, abusive men and pathetically needy, bitchy women, the drudging, deadpan farce tracks Shandling's libidinous frustration as he fails to pick up chicks and is chased by FAA investigator John Goodman (his arrival caused an air traffic incident), who figures out his secret with the flimsiest of suppositions.

Continue reading: What Planet Are You From? Review

Stuck On You Review


OK

When Walt Tenor (Greg Kinnear) decides he wants to become an actor, he tries to convince his twin brother Bob (Matt Damon) -- his conjoined twin brother -- to move out to Hollywood with him by saying, "You could be my stunt double!"

Yes folks, "Stuck On You" is another cheeky comedy of good humor and questionable taste from the Farrelly Brothers ("Kingpin," "There's Something About Mary" and "Shallow Hal"), and yes, folks, they get a surprising amount of mileage out of jokes like that one -- rim-shot-quality punchlines given winkingly ironic sparkle by the wily writing-directing team's laughing-with-not-laughing-at sensibilities.

There's the scene in which Walt walks his shy sibling over to a pretty blonde in a bar, then takes over the seduction himself when Bob blows it -- and ends up bringing the girl home (Bob tries to ignore their moaning from the other side of a makeshift curtain). There's Walt's "one-man" stage show about Truman Capote, in which Bob tries to slouch as inconspicuously as possible behind Walt's back.

Continue reading: Stuck On You Review

Greg Kinnear

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Greg Kinnear

Date of birth

17th June, 1963

Occupation

Actor

Sex

Male

Height

1.76


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