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Money Monster Review

Excellent

A sleekly made thriller with a sparky sense of humour, this is also a rare action movie that has something important to say. Centred around the corruption in the political and banking systems, the film is just as enlightening as The Big Short, but it's a lot more fun to watch. And it's directed by Jodie Foster as a sharp media satire that seems to be skimming along the surface but is actually taking no prisoners.

It's set on Wall Street, where TV guru Lee (George Clooney) hosts his financial advice show Money Monster, directed by his long-time friend Patty (Julia Roberts). Then in the middle of a broadcast, Lee is interrupted live on-air by Kyle (Jack O'Connell), who is consumed with anger because Lee's investment suggestion resulted in the loss of his life savings. Kyle's real target is the banking executive Walt (Dominic West), who has blamed the wipe-out of share prices on a computer glitch. But something about that story doesn't hold water. While Kyle threatens Lee live, a media storm develops around them. And Patty digs into the story with the help of hackers in Korea, Iceland and South Africa, feeding information to Lee through his earpiece.

As the situation spirals out of control, Foster maintains a terrific sense of balance between the edgy suspense and the jagged comedy. This works because, even amid the virtual globe-hopping, she keeps the focus tightly on the interaction between Lee, Patty and Kyle. Clooney and Roberts aren't hugely stretched by their roles, but they are able to add likeable moments of subtle revelation and interaction along the way. O'Connell is the heart of the film, with an impassioned performance that's surprisingly moving. And of course it's easy for everyone in the audience to sympathise with Kyle's frustration about a system in which bankers and politicians pocket billions while the average person struggles to keep their head above water.

Continue reading: Money Monster Review

Lysa Heslov and Grant Heslov - Premiere of 'The Monuments Men' held at the Ziegfeld Theater - Arrivals - New York City, New York, United States - Tuesday 4th February 2014

Lysa Heslov and Grant Heslov

Grant Heslov and Lysa Heslov - The Weinstein Company Presents The LA Premiere Of "August: Osage County" - Los Angles, California, United States - Monday 16th December 2013

Grant Heslov and Lysa Heslov
Grant Heslov and Lysa Heslov
Grant Heslov and Lysa Heslov
Grant Heslov and Lysa Heslov

John Wells, Marilyn Wells, Lysa Heslov and Grant Heslov - The Weinstein Company's "August Osage County" Screening Benefiting Children Mending Hearts & The Episcopal School Of Los Angeles At the Landmark Theater - Los Angeles, California, United States - Thursday 5th December 2013

John Wells, Marilyn Wells, Lysa Heslov and Grant Heslov
John Wells, Emma Kenney and Emmy Rossum
John Wells, Marilyn Wells, Lysa Heslov and Grant Heslov
Marilyn Wells and John Wells
John Wells, Emma Kenney and Emmy Rossum
John Wells, Emma Kenney and Emmy Rossum

Grant Heslov and George Clooney - AFI FEST 2013 Presented By Audi - "August Osage County" Premiere at TCL Chinese Theatre - Hollywood, California, United States - Saturday 9th November 2013

Grant Heslov and George Clooney
Grant Heslov and George Clooney
Grant Heslov and George Clooney
Grant Heslov and George Clooney

Lisa Heslov and Grant Heslov - The 85th Annual Oscars at Hollywood & Highland Center - Red Carpet Arrivals - Los Angeles, California, United States - Sunday 24th February 2013

Lisa Heslov and Grant Heslov

George Clooney, Grant Heslov, Ben Affleck and Jack Nicholson - The 85th Annual Oscars at Hollywood & Highland Center - Press Room - Los Angeles, California, United States - Sunday 24th February 2013

George Clooney, Grant Heslov, Ben Affleck and Jack Nicholson
George Clooney
George Clooney
George Clooney, Grant Heslov, Ben Affleck and Jack Nicholson
George Clooney
George Clooney

Jack Nicholson, George Clooney, Grant Heslov and Ben Affleck - 85th Annual Oscars at Oscars - Los Angeles, California, United States - Sunday 24th February 2013

Jack Nicholson, George Clooney, Grant Heslov and Ben Affleck
Jack Nicholson, George Clooney, Grant Heslov and Ben Affleck
Jack Nicholson, George Clooney, Grant Heslov and Ben Affleck
Grant Heslov, Ben Affleck, George Clooney and Jack Nicholson
Jack Nicholson
Jack Nicholson

Ben Affleck, George Clooney and Grant Heslov - BAFTAS Afterparty London England United Kingdom Sunday 10th February 2013

Ben Affleck, George Clooney and Grant Heslov
Jessica Chastain and Ben Affleck
Ben Affleck, George Clooney and Grant Heslov
George Clooney and Ben Affleck
Ben Affleck, George Clooney and Grant Heslov
Ben Affleck, George Clooney and Grant Heslov

George Clooney, Grant Heslov, Samuel L. Jackson and Ben Affleck - BAFTA Pressroom London United Kingdom Sunday 10th February 2013

George Clooney, Grant Heslov, Samuel L. Jackson and Ben Affleck
George Clooney
George Clooney
George Clooney
George Clooney
George Clooney

Lisa Heslov; Grant Heslov InStyle And Warner Bros. Golden Globe After Party at The Beverly Hilton Hotel - Arrivals Featuring: Lisa Heslov, Grant Heslov Where: Beverly Hills, California, United States When: 13 Jan 2013

Lisa Heslov and Grant Heslov
Lisa Heslov and Grant Heslov
Lisa Heslov and Grant Heslov
Lisa Heslov and Grant Heslov
Lisa Heslov and Grant Heslov
Lisa Heslov and Grant Heslov

Amazing Script Convinced Ben Affleck To Both Act And Direct In 'Argo'


Ben Affleck Chris Terrio Grant Heslov

Ben Affleck couldn't resist getting involved in both acting and directing in new film 'Argo' after seeing the incredible script shown to him by writer Chris Terrio and producer Grant Heslov. The film has been picking up plaudits during its run over the recent film festival season, but it seems none of those reviewing it are bigger fans than Affleck himself, who spoke with enthusiasm about the project recently to reporters.

''I wanted to play him [Tony] because the script was really interesting" he enthused. ''It struck me, right away, that you had this thriller and then, in equal measure, this comic Hollywood satire and this really intricate real-life CIA spy story based on truth.' It was that, he said, that initially made him want to direct it: "That seemed like a fantastically interesting and unusual movie to be a part of" he claimed.

He added ''And then, the actor side of my brain that's still in that phase of auditioning and trying to make connections and get work asked the director of that movie for a job, and the director was in a tough spot and had to say yes.'' Continuing, he said ''When I got the script, I couldn't believe how good it was. They said, 'This is our best script.' And I thought that was some executive hyping me on it, but it really was pretty incredible. I was amazed. I talked to Grant and George and said, 'Look, I really want to do this. This is amazing!' And they said, 'Okay, great! Let's do it!'" It doesn't sound like anyone's going to enjoy the new Ben Affleck movie more than Ben Affleck has.

The Ides Of March Review


Excellent
As a writer-director, Clooney delivers another complex exploration of American politics in this lively drama about the pressures of the campaign trail. The plot is somewhat theatrical, but the stellar cast brings it to life.

Steve (Gosling) is working with campaign director Paul (Hoffman) on the presidential campaign of Pennsylvania Governor Mike Morris (Clooney), and the current focus is the pivotal Ohio primary. As Steve starts to fall for young intern Molly (Wood), he is invited to meet with rival campaign manager Tom (Giamatti). And soon he finds his idealistic world disintegrating around him: Molly reveals information that could destroy Morris' campaign, while meeting with Tom jeopardises Steve's job. Meanwhile, backroom deals with an ambitious senator (Wright) call everyone's integrity into question.

Continue reading: The Ides Of March Review

The American Review


Very Good
Like its central character, this film is almost painstakingly meticulous in the way it sets up each scene. And while it feels like nothing much is happening, there's a lot going on under the surface, and a real sense of growing suspense.

No one really knows Jack (Clooney). Or maybe his name is Edward. Some call him Butterfly, and he's clearly a ruthlessly efficient man who leaves little to chance. An expert in customised guns and ammunition, he's hiding in an Italian village from some nasty Swedes. There he's making a rifle for Mathilde (Reuten) while befriending a priest (Bonacelli) and starting a tentative relationship with local prostitute Carla (Placido). But he doesn't trust anyone, and starts to worry whether he'll survive this job.

Continue reading: The American Review

The Men Who Stare At Goats Review


Excellent
Based on true events as recounted in the Jon Ronson book, this freewheeling war comedy is deeply entertaining due to the crazy-but-believable premise and wonderfully outrageous characters.

Bob (McGregor) is a Michigan journalist desperate to prove himself, so he heads to Kuwait, hoping to find a story in Iraq. He meets the enigmatic Lyn Cassady (Clooney), whose story is so surreal that he can't help but follow him into the hot zone. Lyn is a member of the New Earth Army, a secret platoon formed in the 1980s by a hippie (Bridges) to create soldiers with Jedi mind powers. But their work went wrong when a jealous teammate (Spacey) dragged them into the dark side.

Continue reading: The Men Who Stare At Goats Review

The Men Who Stare At Goats Trailer


Watch the trailer for The Men Who Stare At Goats

Continue: The Men Who Stare At Goats Trailer

Black Sheep (1996) Review


Terrible
Chris Farley's tragic, untimely death at age 33 sparked a newfound admiration of his talents, but loving eyes can't appreciate (or overlook) something as painfully unfunny as Black Sheep, the second and final pairing of Farley and David Spade.

The movie is a lazier, stupider version of Tommy Boy. Al Donnelly (Tim Matheson) is running for governor in Washington state, but his chances are hurt by his well-intentioned but reckless younger brother Mike (Farley), who is a newspaper editor's wet dream. Enter Steve Dodds (Spade), an eager Donnelly volunteer who offers to supervise Mike until the election ends. The pairing is disastrous from the start, and things really get out of hand when Mike gets framed for arson. The two escape to a remote cabin, where they encounter redneck kids, a runaway boulder, and Gary Busey, before uncovering an election scandal.

Continue reading: Black Sheep (1996) Review

Dante's Peak Review


Bad
For those keeping score, here's the new Hollywood movie formula: Twister - tornado + other disaster = $$$!

$$$ may be right, but [][][][][] is definitely not forthcoming, at least not in the case of Dante's Peak, a shameless and blatant rip-off of the mildly entertaining aforementioned film that is largely responsible for the return to prominence of the disaster movie. This time around, it's a volcano that threatens the peace of little Dante's Peak, and it's Pierce Brosnan who comes to the rescue.

Continue reading: Dante's Peak Review

Fail Safe (2000) Review


Very Good
CBS -- of all places -- remade the original, masterful Fail-Safe, a cautionary tale about nuclear war, jammed full of big name movie stars (check out that cast!), and shot in black and white from Walter Bernstein's original screenplay. It's a very faithful remake, even though the production values (it's shot on video) are atrocious. It's a fabulous original film and a worthwhile redo -- but it comes about 20 years too late. Why waste time remaking a tale about nuclear war with the Soviet Union -- a country that no longer existed -- in this millennium? Still, it's worth a look if you're a fan of the original.

Good Night, And Good Luck Review


Excellent
One doesn't need much more of a reason to go to the movies than this: Edward R. Murrow taking on Senator Joe McCarthy (at the height of his power), crisp black-and-white cinematography, the clink of ice cubes over scotch, voluptuous clouds of cigarette smoke hanging in the air, a nation's conscience dangling in the balance. So it is with George Clooney's Good Night, and Good Luck, a film where the mood - just shy of too cool for its own good - sets the scene for Murrow, the patron saint of journalism, to cajole and castigate the audience in a time of complacency. It also has a great jazz soundtrack.

The story of the witch-hunt has endlessly retold, usually laden with the same self-satisfied 20/20 hindsight that afflicts stories of the civil rights movement, and fortunately Clooney and co-writer Grant Heslov see no need to go through it all again. With admirable precision, they've sliced away most all the accoutrements often used to open up the era for the modern viewer, ala Quiz Show. This is a film that takes place almost entirely inside a CBS studio and newsroom, with occasional trips to hallways, elevators, and a network executive's wood-paneled office. Once, they all go out to a bar. It's best in the studio, because that's where we find Murrow - incarnated with almost indecent accuracy by David Strathairn - looking and sounding like as though Rod Serling had decided to rejoin the human race, his manner clipped and astringent, cigarette cocked in one hand like a talisman warding off evil.

Continue reading: Good Night, And Good Luck Review

The Scorpion King Review


Terrible
The Rock: One name symbolizes everything that can be defined as the stereotypical American male. Why? He's a gruff, tough-as-nails, merciless, and sexually magnetic savior of the free world. And he's huge on TV. And sure enough, The Scorpion King - the latest installment in the mind-numbing, insanely profitable Mummy series - is pure trash. Starring the aforementioned WWF superstar, The Scorpion King is filmmaking at its worst.

The Scorpion King ably rehashes the plots of the variety of other, better films including Gladiator, the Indiana Jones series, Flash Gordon, Beastmaster, and even The Goonies. Set 5,000 years ago, a warlord named Memnon (Steven Brand), acting on crazed Napoleonic urges, ravages the land and bends its people into totalitarian rule. With the aid of a seer who foretells the future, Memnon stands invincible against all aggressors.

Continue reading: The Scorpion King Review

The Scorpion King Review


Good

Call it a premature yet promising start to the summer action season. Somehow "The Scorpion King" -- a movie starring a professional wrestler and spun off from a shameful sequel -- has become the most enjoyably, unapologetically jumbo-sized popcorn flick since 1999's remake of "The Mummy," this picture's indirect ascendant.

While "The Scorpion King" aims for a considerably lower brow, it's a vast improvement on its idiotic immediate predecessor. In "The Mummy Returns," WWF wrestler The Rock had a bit part as the movie's second resurrected bad guy, an ancient Akkadian king who sold his soul to a "dark god" in order to win a war. "The Scorpion King" is that character's backstory, a tongue-in-cheek, "Conan the Barbarian"-like, 3000 B.C. adventure packed with over-the-top action and intentionally cheesy catch-phrase dialogue.

The Rock plays Mathayus, a sinewy assassin hired by the assembled remnants of several defeated tribes to kill the sorcerer who serves a powerful tyrant king that decimate their lands and peoples. Without supernatural guidance, the inexplicably interracial tribes (led by colossal Michael Clarke Duncan, "The Green Mile") believe they can defeat the ruthless, psychopathic Memnon (Steven Brand) and his silly mohawk-flattop hair-do.

Continue reading: The Scorpion King Review

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Grant Heslov Movies

Suburbicon Movie Review

Suburbicon Movie Review

This film feels kind of like what you'd expect from a collision between George Clooney...

Money Monster Movie Review

Money Monster Movie Review

A sleekly made thriller with a sparky sense of humour, this is also a rare...

The Monuments Men Movie Review

The Monuments Men Movie Review

For an amazing true story performed by such a strong A-list cast, this is an...

August: Osage County Movie Review

August: Osage County Movie Review

Tracy Letts adapts his own prize-winning play into a blistering depiction of one of cinema's...

Argo Movie Review

Argo Movie Review

Ben Affleck leaps on to the A-list of directors with this relentlessly entertaining thriller, combining...

The Ides of March Movie Review

The Ides of March Movie Review

As a writer-director, Clooney delivers another complex exploration of American politics in this lively drama...

The American Movie Review

The American Movie Review

Like its central character, this film is almost painstakingly meticulous in the way it sets...

The Men Who Stare at Goats Movie Review

The Men Who Stare at Goats Movie Review

Based on true events as recounted in the Jon Ronson book, this freewheeling war comedy...

The Men Who Stare At Goats Trailer

The Men Who Stare At Goats Trailer

Watch the trailer for The Men Who Stare At Goats Bob Wilton is a journalist...

Dante's Peak Movie Review

Dante's Peak Movie Review

For those keeping score, here's the new Hollywood movie formula: Twister - tornado +...

Good Night, and Good Luck Movie Review

Good Night, and Good Luck Movie Review

One doesn't need much more of a reason to go to the movies than this:...

The Scorpion King Movie Review

The Scorpion King Movie Review

The Rock: One name symbolizes everything that can be defined as the stereotypical American...

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