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Meg Ryan And John Mellencamp Split. Why is Meg Ryan So Unlucky In Love?


Meg Ryan John Mellencamp Dennis Quaid Russell Crowe Graham King

The greatest surprise that celebrity watchers will feel for the split of actor Meg Ryan and singer-songwriter John Mellencamp, was the fact that these two screen veterans were even dating in the first place. Such was the pair’s coyness and clandestine approach to the relationship that their coupling largely flew under the radar. The liaison itself lasted all of three years and marks another in a long list of failed relationships for the now 52 year-old Ryan.

Meg Ryan And John Mellencamp
Ryan and Mellencamp's relationship remained largely hidden from the glare of the media

Ryan and Mellencamp came together some time in 2010, after Mellencamp ended an 18 year marriage with Elaine Irwin, a former model who was once the face of Ralph Lauren. Splitting their time between an east coast dwelling and Mellencamp’s longtime home of Indiana, it has been cited that it was the sheer distance between the pair that led to the split. Ryan, once a prolific actress, has not appeared in a motion picture since 2009’s Serious Moonlight but is currently producing a film entitled Ithaca. Meanwhile, Mellencamp has been busy on a new album, Plain Spoken, which is due for release shortly. But why can’t Ryan keep hold of a man?

Continue reading: Meg Ryan And John Mellencamp Split. Why is Meg Ryan So Unlucky In Love?

Jersey Boys Review


Weak

Music-lover Clint Eastwood adapts the long-running stage musical for the big screen with mixed results: it recounts a terrific true story but has an uneven pace. It also fails to put the events into any kind of context in the period, which leaves the achievements of Frankie Valli and the Four Seasons feeling isolated from the rest of the music industry of the time. So it's difficult to engage in much of what happens.

In 1951 Newark, Frankie (John Lloyd Young) works as a barber's assistant, hangs out with a mafioso (Christopher Walken) and sings in a band with his pals Tommy and Nick (Vincent Piazza and Michael Lomenda), troublemakers up to all kinds of scams. But it's when they added songwriter Bob Gaudio (Erich Bergen) to the band that things begin to take off. Working with ace producer Bob Crewe (Mike Doyle), they release three No 1 singles in a row: Sherry, Big Girls Don't Cry and Walk Like a Man. And their fame grows from there. But Tommy's money problems eat away at the band's unity, and Nick begins to think that he's had enough.

Oddly, there the story of the Four Seasons feels dragged out to sustain a two-hour 15-minute film. The narrative is fractured and episodic, with long stretches in which nothing happens that hasn't been portrayed in every other musician biopic. Eastwood directs the film like a serious period epic, draining much of the colour from the screen while concentrating on shades of grey and brown. But the real problem is the script, which never manages to build up any momentum. Big events pale in interest next to the fantastic music, while a confusing flashback jumbles the timeline unnecessarily. And occasional scenes are narrated by the actors straight to camera, which is extremely distracting on a film screen, especially when Nick stops singing and starts chatting to us in the middle of the band's iconic performance on The Ed Sullivan Show.

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Vanity Fair Oscar Party

Graham King and guest - 2013 Vanity Fair Oscar Party at Sunset Tower - Arrivals - Los Angeles, California, United States - Sunday 24th February 2013

56th BFI London Film Festival: Argo - Accenture gala

Graham King, Bryan Cranston, Ben Affleck, John Goodman and Odeon Leicester Square - Graham King, Bryan Cranston, Ben Affleck and John Goodman held at the Odeon Leicester Square - Arrivals 56th BFI London Film Festival: Argo - Accenture gala Wednesday 17th October 2012

Graham King, Bryan Cranston, Ben Affleck, John Goodman and Odeon Leicester Square
Graham King, Bryan Cranston, Ben Affleck, John Goodman and Odeon Leicester Square

56th BFI London Film Festival: Argo - Accenture gala held at the Odeon Leicester Square - Arrivals

Graham King and Odeon Leicester Square Wednesday 17th October 2012 56th BFI London Film Festival: Argo - Accenture gala held at the Odeon Leicester Square - Arrivals

56th BFI London Film Festival: Argo - Accenture gala

Graham King, Bryan Cranston, Ben Affleck, John Goodman and Odeon Leicester Square - Graham King, Bryan Cranston, Ben Affleck, John Goodman held at the Odeon Leicester Square - Arrivals. 56th BFI London Film Festival: Argo - Accenture gala Wednesday 17th October 2012

56th BFI London Film Festival: Argo - Accenture gala

Graham King and Odeon Leicester Square held at the Odeon Leicester Square - Arrivals 56th BFI London Film Festival: Argo - Accenture gala Wednesday 17th October 2012

Graham King and Odeon Leicester Square

Dark Shadows Review


Weak
There were 1,245 episodes of the gothic soap Dark Shadows between 1966 and 1971, so adapting it into a movie was never going to be easy. The script is an odd mix of smart dialog and random plot-strands, and while Burton gets the style right he never quite finds the tone.

After spending nearly 200 years trapped in a coffin, Barnabas Collins (Depp) is released to rejoin what's left of his wealthy New England family in 1972. The matriarch Elizabeth (Pfeiffer) now lives in the falling-down manor Collinswood with her brother Roger (Miller), her daughter (Moretz) and his son (McGrath), as well as a live-in shrink (Bonham Carter), a caretaker (Haley) and a new governess (Heathcote). But Angelique (Green), the witch who turned Barnabas into a vampire, is still trying to destroy the family.

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Hugo Review


Excellent

Based on the Brian Selznick novel The Invention of Hugo Cabret, Scorsese's first family movie combines a young boy's adventure with a cinematic history lesson. It's a celebration of wide-eyed wonder that's a joy to watch, although the title isn't the only thing that's dumbed-down.

In early 1930s Paris, the orphaned Hugo (Butterfield) lives in Montparnasse station, where he scurries through forgotten passageways maintaining the clocks. He learned this skill from his late father (Law), but an automaton they were fixing is his only reminder of his happier childhood. Dodging the tenacious station inspector (Baron Cohen), Hugo worms his way into the life of grouchy shopkeeper Georges (Kingsley), and has a series of adventures with his goddaughter Isabelle (Moretz). When they learn that Georges is forgotten pioneer filmmaker Georges Melies, they decide to help bring him back to life.

Scorsese tells this story with bravura moviemaking trickery, from whooshing tracking shots to wonderfully inventive uses of 3D. He also peppers the screen with witty references to film history from Modern Times to Vertigo, clips from early cinema and flashbacks to the Lumiere brothers' exhibition and Melies' busy studio. Meanwhile, the main plot unfolds with a warmly inviting glow, sharply telling details and a colourful cast of memorable side characters.
Intriguingly, everyone is a bit opaque; like the automaton, the gears turn but we never really understand them.

Butterfield's Hugo may be consumed by an inner yearning, but he's always on guard, providing a watchful pair of eyes through which we see the drama, romance and slapstick of the station. And it's in these details that Scorsese and his cast draw us in. Standouts are Baron Cohen, who adds layers of comedy and pathos to every scene, and McCrory (as Mrs Melies), with her barely suppressed enthusiasm. As usual, Kingsley never lets his guard down: he invests this broken man with a bit too much dignity.

As the film progresses, the passion for the movies is infectious. Scorsese's gorgeous visual approach and writer Logan's controlled cleverness never overwhelm the human story. And even if Melies' life and Paris' geography are adjusted for no real reason, the film's warm drama and delightful imagery really get under the skin, making us fall in love with the movies all over again.

The Rum Diary Review


OK
Depp's Hunter S Thompson fixation continues with the adaptation of this loosely autobiographical novel. Despite some crazy antics, the film takes an earnest, slightly too-faithful tone that makes it strangely leaden.

In 1960, Kemp (Depp) applies for a job at the San Juan Star in Puerto Rico, working for the sardonic editor Lotterman (Jenkins). He shares a ramshackle flat with photographer Sala (Rispoli), who home-brews super-strong rum with another journalist (Ribisi). While getting slowly pickled, Kemp also gets to know the fast-talking Sanderson (Eckhart), a public relations expert who is using property developers to increase his fortune. Sanderson also has a sexy girlfriend, Chenault (Heard), who immediately catches Kemp's eye. Trouble is brewing everywhere.

Continue reading: The Rum Diary Review

Rango Review


OK
Inventive visuals and lively voice cast lift this finely animated film above the fray. So it's a shame that the story feels both random and predictable. It also uses 40-year-old references that younger viewers won't get.

When a pet chameleon (voiced by Depp) is lost in the desert, he wanders into Dirt, a parched Wild West town populated by scruffy, attitude-filled vermin. He immediately reinvents himself as the heroic Rango, and as sheriff promises to restore the missing water supply. He proves his mettle by squaring off against a vicious hawk, but the slippery tortoise Mayor (Beatty), a family of sneaky moles and a vicious rattlesnake (Nighy) will require more effort. As will his developing romance with feisty girl-lizard Bean (Fisher).

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The Tourist Review


Weak
This is a thoroughly offbeat concoction from the gifted filmmaker behind the acclaimed The Lives of Others: a rather goofy action comedy that deflates the suspense by telling us pretty much everything from the start.

Elisa (Jolie) is a sleek, overdressed woman of mystery who is being stalked by a tenacious British detective (Bettany). When she boards a train from Paris to Venice, his men are in hot pursuit, so she sidles up to American touristFrank (Depp) to throw them off the scent. He looks similar to her boyfriend, who's wanted by the cops and a vicious Russian mobster (Berkoff). Once in Venice, Frank finds his world turned upside both by this ludicrously elegant woman and the army of goons pursuing him at every turn.

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The Town Review


Excellent
Ben Affleck confirms his directing skills with this sharply made thriller, which carefully maintains a human connection with its characters. It's an astutely observed story, finely told by both cast and crew.

The Charlestown neighbourhood in Boston is a notorious home for bank robbers, and Doug (Affleck) leads fiendishly efficient heists with his brother-like pal Jem (Renner), driver Albert (Slaine) and techie Des (Burke). But Jem's trigger-happy temper almost undoes the last job when he briefly takes bank manager Claire (Hall) hostage. To make sure she's not going to turn them in to tenacious FBI Agent Frawley (Hamm), Doug gets to know her. And of course falls in love, finally seeing a way out of this dodgy life.

Continue reading: The Town Review

Edge Of Darkness Review


Weak
Based on the 1985 BBC TV series, also directed by Campbell, this dramatic thriller tries to pack so much into two hours that it ends up feeling thin and repetitive. But it's great to have Gibson back on screen.

Veteran Boston cop Thomas (Gibson) is trying to rebuild his relationship with his scientist daughter Emma (Novakovic) when she's viciously gunned down.

Everyone suspects Thomas was the real target, but his investigation leads him into a conspiracy involving her job with a monolithic defence contractor run by the shady Bennett (Huston). Then he meets government clean-up expert Jedburgh (Winstone) and starts to realise the extent of what's gong on. Can he blow the whistle before they rub him out too?

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Edge Of Darkness Trailer


Watch the trailer for Edge Of Darkness

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