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First ‘9’ On Dancing With The Stars, Courtesy Of Sabrina Bryan


Sabrina Bryan Dancing With The Stars Carrie Ann Inaba Bruno Tonioli Ginger Rogers Len Goodman The Cheetah Girls Bristol Palin Mark Ballas Kirstie Alley

Dancing With The Stars Season 15 had its first ‘9’ score last night (October 1, 2012), courtesy of girl band singer Sabrina Bryan. Her routine, with Louis Van Amstel, had the judges in rapture, especially Carrie Ann Inaba who said she’d never seen such lines of Dancing With the Stars before, according to People magazine. Bruno Tonioli awarded Sabrina 8.5 and compared her to Ginger Rogers, at the height of her career: “a true dazzler.” Len Goodman was equally full of praise for The Cheetah Girls star, remarking on her upper body control and legwork: “the hits just keep on coming,” he said.

At the other end of the scale was Bristol Palin who went home with the lowest score of the evening – a paltry 18, which was less than last week’s score of 19.5. “You were not in hold enough,” Bruno told her, as her Western-inspired routine failed to impress. Palin explained that she had taken her dancing partner Mark Ballas to a shooting range to give him an insight into her world but that sadly hadn’t translated into chemistry on the dance floor.

It was the second episode of the show and tonight, someone will be going home, in the Dancing With The Stars results show. One dancer unlikely to exit tonight is Kirstie Alley, who proved to the judges that her age should not be an obstacle to her progressing n the competition. “Age is just a number and you just proved that to us,” said Carrie Ann, whilst Bruno told her “Experience counts, and you showed it. You blended beautifully.”


42nd Street Review


Excellent
Of Golden Age musicals, 42nd Street is about as close to the archetype as they come. It's about an hour of exposition as a big Broadway director puts on his last big show (as he's ill), and all manner of catastrophes befall him en route to opening night. Most notably in 42nd Street, his star breaks her ankle and has to be replaced by a chorus girl. Then comes the music and dancing, rapid fire. While "Shuffle Off to Buffalo" is the sentimental favorite musical number, it's the title song and dance number, about 20 minutes of insanity that takes place largely on an enormous lazy susan, that really gets things moving. Too bad it comes right at the end.

Kitty Foyle Review


Good
Ginger Rogers stepped out of her tap shoes for this non-singing, non-dancing performance, a wartime drama that must have had America abuzz with hope. Kitty Foyle is about to be married to a poor doctor when an old, wealthy flame returns to her life, offering to whisk her away to South America. What will she do? Leave it to her conscience -- as seen in the mirror -- and lengthy flashbacks to help her along with the decision. Overly melodramatic, the film has aged rather poorly (despite Rogers' Oscar-winning performance) and seems rather un-feminist today. Still, it's an odd and unique testament to 1940s' zeitgeist, a period of hope and despair, both of which are reflected in Ms. Foyle.

Continue reading: Kitty Foyle Review

Stage Door Review


Extraordinary
Stage Door deserves its own solid gold time capsule. This is one for the ages, a hyperwitty comedy/drama written by the brilliant Edna Ferber and George S. Kaufman who took their play from the Broadway stage to the RKO soundstage and put it in the capable hands of director Gregory La Cava and an all-star cast of the most dazzling leading ladies of the 1930s. No, they don't make 'em like this anymore.

Justifiably famous for a rapid-fire script jam-packed with barbed remarks and caustic retorts, the film makes you stifle your laughter so you don't miss the next oncoming zinger. At one point, an exasperated Terry Randall (Katharine Hepburn) says to the delightfully bitchy Jean Maitland (Ginger Rogers), "It'd be a terrific innovation if you could get your mind to stretch a little further than the next wisecrack." Indeed.

Continue reading: Stage Door Review

Top Hat Review


Excellent
Perhaps the definitive Fred & Ginger movie, Top Hat is a story of love and longing and... of course, dancin' galore! Some of the famed couple's greatest moments are on display here: "Dancing Cheek to Cheek" as a couple, and most memorably, Astaire's "Top Hat & Tails" number wherein he uses his cane to "gun down" a lineup of dancers, one by one, his tap shoes serving as the crack of the weapon.

The plot is thin, as is common in 1930s musicals: Astaire is a dancer that's just busting at the seams with his art. He shows off some moves one night in his apartment (and what moves they are, making excellent use of the props in the room), only this annoys the hell out of the woman (Rogers) living downstairs. It's one of the few times that a musical actually makes reference to the fact that it's not normal to break into song and dance whenever the mood strikes you, though of course, eventually, Rogers gets in on the act herself.

Continue reading: Top Hat Review

Monkey Business Review


Very Good
Mr. Oxley's been complaining about her "punctuation," so she makes sure she's at her desk by nine. That's about the sum of Marilyn Monroe's contribution to Monkey Business, a screwball comedy (made about 10 years after the real end of the screwball era) featuring a kooky scientist, his patient wife, a brazen and dippy secretary, and of course a chimpanzee who's really calling the shots.

The plot involves the hunt for a youth formula by Barnaby Fulton (Cary Grant), which he thinks he has discovered when a self-administered sample drives him to do such crazy things as buy a new car and crash it into a chain link fence with his boss's secretary (Monroe) riding shotgun. The only problem is that the sample hasn't done anything; it's the water, spiked by the chimp when no one was looking.

Continue reading: Monkey Business Review

The Barkleys Of Broadway Review


OK
Ten years after what everyone assumed would be Fred Astaire and Ginger Rogers' last joint venture, they reunited for a final time. Unfortunately the result is a tepid Technicolor musical with little to recommend it aside from its historical value. The story is barely worth mentioning: Backstage histrionics surrounding a pair of Broadway theatricals and their power play. The dancing isn't much more noteworthy, mainly recycled Gershwin tunes that have been put to better effect in other films -- including ones starring this famous duo.

Swing Time Review


Very Good
Fred Astaire's "Lucky" really is anything but. In the opening scene he's tricked into missing his wedding due to an argument over the cuffs on his pants -- all part of a bet... you see, Lucky's got a bit of a gambling problem, and this doesn't really get any better over the course of the movie.

Maybe it's for the best, though. Missing the wedding winds him up with Penny (Ginger Rogers), who we're sure is going to be a better match for Lucky, because, you know, she can dance. (Here, in a bit of comic kitsch, she's a dance instructor and he's never danced before... though he proves to be an exceedingly fast learner.)

Continue reading: Swing Time Review

Follow The Fleet Review


OK
A really tepid outing from Astaire and Rogers, Follow the Fleet has none of the flair of other hoofin' flicks of the era, giving us Astaire as an unbelievable navy sailor (who chastises his crewmates in an early scene for not letting him forget he "used to be a hoofer"). Of course he ends up wooing and dancing with Ginger Rogers -- but , alas, none of the songs are memorable.
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Ginger Rogers Movies

Stage Door Movie Review

Stage Door Movie Review

Stage Door deserves its own solid gold time capsule. This is one for the ages,...

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