Gina Mckee

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Hector Trailer


For the past 15 years, Hector McAdam has been somewhat of a drifter having left his small Scottish village Hector found solace moving from shelter to shelter in various parts of the UK. Hector might be in his latter years but each Christmas he finds himself traveling to London to visit a homeless refuge where he has friends.

After years of drifting, in a bid to reunite with his family, Hector takes steps to track down and find his brother and find a way to begin to make amends for his constant absence.

Hector once again takes to the road and begins a journey that will take various turns - both emotionally and physically. Even though the setting of Hector's life is one of sorrow, his personality and resilience makes for a heart-warming look at life.

Continue: Hector Trailer

Gina McKee - 66th Cannes Film Festival - Jimmy P. Psychotherapy of a Plains Indian - Premiere - Cannes, France - Sunday 19th May 2013

Gina Mckee

Gina McKee - 66th Cannes Film Festival - 'Jimmy P: Psychotherapy of a Plains Indian' - Photocall - Cannes, France - Saturday 18th May 2013

Gina Mckee
Gina Mckee

Gina McKee Tuesday 27th March 2012 'The King's Speech' press night held at the Wyndham's Theatre - Arrivals.

Gina Mckee
Gina Mckee

Gina McKee - Gina McKee, London, England - at the press night of Mike Poulton's new production of 'Luise Miller' at The Donmar Warehouse. Monday 13th June 2011

Gina Mckee

Gina McKee - Sunday 28th March 2010 at Grosvenor House London, England

Gina Mckee
Gina Mckee
Gina Mckee
Gina Mckee
Gina Mckee
Gina Mckee

In The Loop Review


Extraordinary
Frankly, it's a stroke of genius to play a tense political thriller as if it's a raucous satire. Slicing straight through any over-seriousness, this film keeps us laughing loudly as it tells a story that's probably far truer than we'd like to believe.

Malcolm Tucker (Capaldi) is the acerbic communications director for Britain's Prime Minister, and right now he has to put out a fire started by Cabinet Minister Foster (Hollander), who called war in the Middle East "unforeseeable" in a radio interview. Foster's aides (Addison and McKee) are working to keep him on the crest of a tidal wave of attention after some American politicians (Kennedy and Rasche) take an interest in him. In Washington they also meet a tough Pentagon General (Gandolfini), while unseen forces seem determined to rush to war.

Continue reading: In The Loop Review

Tsunami: The Aftermath Review


Excellent
As its title suggests, HBO Films' Tsunami: The Aftermath begins not with a crashing wave of water but rather with something far more chilling. A boatload of vacationing scuba divers returns to their Phuket resort after a morning outing on December 26, 2004 and notice all sorts of debris, and then bodies, in the water. At the dock they see that the entire landscape is destroyed, the hotel is in ruins, and everyone, including their families and friends, is gone. As they run through the wreckage screaming, you'll feel chills.

Among the group is Susie Carter (Sophie Okonedo), who quickly reunites with her husband Ian (Chiwetel Ejiofor) but is devastated to learn their four-year-old daughter slipped out of her father's arms and has disappeared. Meanwhile, Kim Peabody (Gina McKee) has lost her husband but finds her teenage son horribly injured.

Continue reading: Tsunami: The Aftermath Review

Tsunami: The Aftermath Review


Excellent
As its title suggests, HBO Films' Tsunami: The Aftermath begins not with a crashing wave of water but rather with something far more chilling. A boatload of vacationing scuba divers returns to their Phuket resort after a morning outing on December 26, 2004 and notice all sorts of debris, and then bodies, in the water. At the dock they see that the entire landscape is destroyed, the hotel is in ruins, and everyone, including their families and friends, is gone. As they run through the wreckage screaming, you'll feel chills.

Among the group is Susie Carter (Sophie Okonedo), who quickly reunites with her husband Ian (Chiwetel Ejiofor) but is devastated to learn their four-year-old daughter slipped out of her father's arms and has disappeared. Meanwhile, Kim Peabody (Gina McKee) has lost her husband but finds her teenage son horribly injured.

Continue reading: Tsunami: The Aftermath Review

MirrorMask Review


Good
If the 1980s Bowie/puppet fantasy campfest Labyrinth had been redone by British Dali fetishists with a deep love of The Wizard of Oz, the result might have been something like the ambitious but flawed MirrorMask. A joining of forces between the dark imaginations of graphic novel auteurs Neil Gaiman and Dave McKean (screenwriter and director, respectively) and the technological prowess of the Jim Henson Workshop, it attempts to create a more substantive cinematic fantasy world than today's SpongeBob and Playstation-besotted kids may be used to. As such, this admittedly stupendous-looking film deserves quite a lot of credit for trying, even if the end result never quite makes it.

A central problem with MirrorMask is that the story (as will be obvious even to those not familiar with Gaiman and McKean's work on such landmark graphic novels as Sandman and Books of Magic) is something the two of them could have dashed off in one coffee-fueled afternoon. Helena (Stephanie Leonidas) is an angry teenager whose parents (Gina McKee, Rob Brydon), to her eternal dismay, run a tatty circus that takes up all their time. As a family crisis comes to a boil - Mum goes into hospital while Dad tries to keep everything from falling apart and the circus employees wonder how they're going to get paid - Helen, who'd much rather have normal parents than eccentric showpeople, falls into a dream world where she's on a quest to find the MirrorMask, a magical object that will allow her to escape the Dark Lands and return to her family. Maybe. She just has to figure out what the MirrorMask is. And what it looks like.

Continue reading: MirrorMask Review

Notting Hill Review


Excellent
Julia Roberts is Julia Roberts - almost - in Notting Hill, a well-crafted romantic comedy from the geniuses behind Four Weddings and a Funeral.

The deceptively simple plot begins when uber-famous film star Anna Scott (Roberts) winds up in William's (Grant) book shop on Notting Hill, something of a British cross between a pre-Disney Times Square and a Moroccan street market. After William accidentally dumps orange juice down Anna's front, an on-again, off-again, on-again, off-again, on-again love affair blossoms.

Continue reading: Notting Hill Review

MirrorMask Review


Good
If the 1980s Bowie/puppet fantasy campfest Labyrinth had been redone by British Dali fetishists with a deep love of The Wizard of Oz, the result might have been something like the ambitious but flawed MirrorMask. A joining of forces between the dark imaginations of graphic novel auteurs Neil Gaiman and Dave McKean (screenwriter and director, respectively) and the technological prowess of the Jim Henson Workshop, it attempts to create a more substantive cinematic fantasy world than today's SpongeBob and Playstation-besotted kids may be used to. As such, this admittedly stupendous-looking film deserves quite a lot of credit for trying, even if the end result never quite makes it.

A central problem with MirrorMask is that the story (as will be obvious even to those not familiar with Gaiman and McKean's work on such landmark graphic novels as Sandman and Books of Magic) is something the two of them could have dashed off in one coffee-fueled afternoon. Helena (Stephanie Leonidas) is an angry teenager whose parents (Gina McKee, Rob Brydon), to her eternal dismay, run a tatty circus that takes up all their time. As a family crisis comes to a boil - Mum goes into hospital while Dad tries to keep everything from falling apart and the circus employees wonder how they're going to get paid - Helen, who'd much rather have normal parents than eccentric showpeople, falls into a dream world where she's on a quest to find the MirrorMask, a magical object that will allow her to escape the Dark Lands and return to her family. Maybe. She just has to figure out what the MirrorMask is. And what it looks like.

Continue reading: MirrorMask Review

Wonderland (2000) Review


OK
The city of London has a million stories, and Wonderland tells just one of them -- well, okay, three. No, five -- five! Six -- eight -- all right, eleven subplots competing for screen time.

At the center are three sisters lookin' for a little love and compassion. Perky Soho waitress Nadia (Gina McKee, Croupier), her hair punked out in cute rabbit ears, indulges in the lonely hearts club of personal ads for Mr. Right, or at least a decent lay. Abrasive, no-nonsense hairdresser Debbie (Shirley Henderson, Topsy-Turvy) settles into a tract of not taking shit from anyone, especially her irresponsible ex, Dan (Ian Hart, Spring Forward). He can barely be counted on for weekend visits to their teenage son (Peter Marfleet). Molly (Molly Parker, Waking the Dead) is very pregnant and needs a little support from her friends, especially when her husband (John Simm) goes through a mid-life career meltdown.

Continue reading: Wonderland (2000) Review

Croupier Review


Very Good
Mike Hodges, best known for the lean and mean Get Carter (1971), returns to form with Croupier. This polished throwback to the wit and economy of British thrillers from the late '60s and early '70s certainly has style to spare, but like its smooth operator protagonist, it lacks a soul.

Down on his luck novelist Jack Manfred (Clive Owen, handsome and angular as a young Sean Connery) is forced to make ends meet by taking a job at a high stakes casino. He's a croupier, or dealer, operating with cold precision. He sizes up gamblers who line up as the roulette wheel to try their luck.

Continue reading: Croupier Review

The Reckoning Review


Weak

In "The Reckoning," a troupe of 14th century traveling actors abandon their standard Bible-story fare while visiting a small fiefdom in order to reenact the recent murder of a local boy, and discover in the process that the official version of events is a cover-up for something far more disconcerting.

Having an outsiders' perspective, the players can sense something amiss with the local Church-based justice, and one of their number -- himself a disgraced priest on the run played by Paul Bettany -- feels compelled to investigate. A mute, wild-woman healer (and thus a suspected witch) is scheduled to hang for the crime, but what he discovers leads the actors to risk their lives to expose the truth by presenting a play based on the facts.

Unfortunately, writer Mark Mills (who adapted Barry Unsworth's novel "Morality Play") and director Paul McGuigan utterly fail to address one fundamental problem with their story: What makes them think the people of this village would pay to see the still-fresh horror of a child's brutal murder fictionalized for them like some Middle-Ages Movie of the Week?

Continue reading: The Reckoning Review

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Gina McKee Movies

Hector Trailer

Hector Trailer

For the past 15 years, Hector McAdam has been somewhat of a drifter having left...

In the Loop Movie Review

In the Loop Movie Review

Frankly, it's a stroke of genius to play a tense political thriller as if it's...

In The Loop Trailer

In The Loop Trailer

Watch the trailer for In The LoopSimon Foster is a British politician who is an...

Scenes Of A Sexual Nature, Trailer Trailer

Scenes Of A Sexual Nature, Trailer Trailer

Scenes Of A Sexual Nature Trailer First time British director Ed Blum presents Scenes of...

MirrorMask Movie Review

MirrorMask Movie Review

If the 1980s Bowie/puppet fantasy campfest Labyrinth had been redone by British Dali fetishists with...

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Notting Hill Movie Review

Notting Hill Movie Review

Julia Roberts is Julia Roberts - almost - in Notting Hill, a well-crafted romantic comedy...

MirrorMask Movie Review

MirrorMask Movie Review

If the 1980s Bowie/puppet fantasy campfest Labyrinth had been redone by British Dali fetishists with...

Croupier Movie Review

Croupier Movie Review

Mike Hodges, best known for the lean and mean Get Carter (1971), returns to form...

The Reckoning Movie Review

The Reckoning Movie Review

Starting out as a cunning variation on the crime thriller, this medieval mystery (set in...

The Reckoning Movie Review

The Reckoning Movie Review

In "The Reckoning," a troupe of 14th century traveling actors abandon their standard Bible-story fare...

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