George Wallace

George Wallace

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George Wallace leaves the Palm restaurant

George Wallace - George Wallace leaves the Palm restaurant in Beverly Hills - Los Angeles, California, United States - Wednesday 4th March 2015

George Wallace
George Wallace
George Wallace
George Wallace
George Wallace

Penn Jillette special flavor ice cream

Penn Jillette, Taylor Hicks, George Wallace, Teller, Las Vegas Show Girls, Residents of Opportunity Village and Blue Man Group - 'All-Star Celebrity Apprentice' finalist Penn Jillette launches special flavor ice cream 'Vanilla & Chocolate Magic Swirtle' at Walgreens on the Las Vegas Strip - Las Vegas, NV, United States - Monday 13th May 2013

Penn Jillette
Penn Jillette and Teller
Penn Jillette, Taylor Hicks, George Wallace, Teller, Las Vegas Show Girls, Residents of Opportunity Village and Blue Man Group
Penn Jillette, Taylor Hicks, George Wallace, Teller, Las Vegas Show Girls, Residents of Opportunity Village and Blue Man Group
Penn Jillette and Teller

2012 Soul Train Awards at Planet Hollywood Resort and Casino - Performance

George Wallace Thursday 8th November 2012 2012 Soul Train Awards at Planet Hollywood Resort and Casino - Performance

George Wallace

2012 Soul Train Awards at the fabulous Planet Hollywood Resort and Casino - Arrivals

George Wallace Thursday 8th November 2012 2012 Soul Train Awards at the fabulous Planet Hollywood Resort and Casino - Arrivals

George Wallace

Catfish In Black Bean Sauce Review


OK
Now here's an unconventional family for the new decade: two Vietnamese siblings are brought up in California by a black couple; sister Mai marries an Asian, and brother Dwayne's getting engaged to an African-American woman (Love and Basketball's Sanaa Lathan). While this is juicy enough, first time writer/director/actor Chi Moui Lo throws some real spice into his comedy-drama mix: Mai (The Joy Luck Club's Lauren Tom) has found her Vietnamese birth mother, and is bringing her to the States.

Lo, who plays Dwayne, uses these circumstances to attempt an original look at families and their identities, but his basic concepts are better than their execution. The effort is certainly worth noticing -- his script is an impressive debut, trying to flesh out nine closely-knit characters -- but some stale and predictable presentation drags down a strong idea.

Continue reading: Catfish In Black Bean Sauce Review

The Wash Review


Terrible
Filmmaker D.J. Pooh is no stranger to disjointed, pointless, overwrought urban comedies. He was the mastermind behind 2000's brash brain-dead farce 3 Strikes, and now Pooh conjures up another flaccid farce in the inept comedy The Wash. As with his misguided efforts of 3 Strikes, Pooh wants to convey The Wash as a hip, rambunctious inner city offering that showcases its rollicking homeboys. Basically, the feeling is that you can't go wrong when featuring the likes of intense hip-hop personalities such as Snoop Dogg and Dr. Dre. Alas, the soundtrack is the only asset to this mindless flick.

Roommates Sean (Dr. Dre) and Dee Loc (Snoop Dogg) are a couple of cutups who live for turmoil. When Sean gets fired from his job, he's left with practically nothing to show for his life. With no car and the possibility of imminent eviction from his apartment, Sean is desperate for work. Dee Loc informs him of a position at his work -- a nearby South Central L.A. car wash run by Mr. Washington (comedian George Wallace), where as luck would have it, Mr. Washington has just fired his assistant manager. And so Sean is hired, making him Dee Loc's superior. Thanks to his new status as boss, Sean starts to abuse his authority and in the process, alienates his subordinates. Predictably, Sean's charges are colorful indeed: the brooding and bulky Bear (Tiny Lister Jr.); C-Money (Lamont Bentley), a cretin who steals items from the customers' cars; and token Hispanic poster boy Juan (Demetrius Navarro).

Continue reading: The Wash Review

The Ladykillers Review


Grim

The Coen Brothers flopped with last year's comedically clumsy and questionably hammy "Intolerable Cruelty," and now that they have repeated and amplified the same arched-performance mistakes in "The Ladykillers," I am beginning to understand what it is about Joel and Ethan's movies that their detractors dislike so much.

The characters in the Coens' recent comedies have frequently been oblivious to the world beyond their whimsical capers, and in these last two pictures even the protagonists have become objects for audience ridicule, making them poor surrogates for getting us involved in their stories.

Tom Hanks takes that bullet in this loose remake of a 1955 British laffer about a band of crooks inadvertently foiled by the little old landlady who rents them a room. All toothy, affected mannerisms and blabbering balderdash as the endlessly loquacious supposed mastermind of the criminal enterprise, his character is nothing but caricature -- an over-educated, old-fashioned, pocket-watch-and-hankie type Southern gentleman who goes by the tongue-tying moniker of Professor Goldthwait Higginson Dorr, Ph.D.

Continue reading: The Ladykillers Review

George Wallace

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