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Friends of the late comedian George Carlin gathered to honor him at the John F Kennedy Center's annual Mark Twain Awards.

Gary Shandling, George Carlin and John F Kennedy Monday 10th November 2008 Friends of the late comedian George Carlin gathered to honor him at the John F Kennedy Center's annual Mark Twain Awards. Washington DC, USA

Friends of the late comedian George Carlin gathered to honor him at the John F Kennedy Center's annual Mark Twain Awards.

Kelly Carlin's, George Carlin and John F Kennedy - Kelly Carlin's and Patrick Carlin Hall of Nations Kennedy Center Washington DC, USA - Friends of the late comedian George Carlin gathered to honor him at the John F Kennedy Center's annual Mark Twain Awards. Monday 10th November 2008

Friends of the late comedian George Carlin gathered to honor him at the John F Kennedy Center's annual Mark Twain Awards.

Joan Rivers, George Carlin and John F Kennedy Monday 10th November 2008 Friends of the late comedian George Carlin gathered to honor him at the John F Kennedy Center's annual Mark Twain Awards. Washington DC, USA

Joan Rivers, George Carlin and John F Kennedy
Joan Rivers, George Carlin and John F Kennedy
Joan Rivers, George Carlin and John F Kennedy

Friends of the late comedian George Carlin gathered to honor him at the John F Kennedy Center's annual Mark Twain Awards.

Dennis Leary, George Carlin and John F Kennedy Monday 10th November 2008 Friends of the late comedian George Carlin gathered to honor him at the John F Kennedy Center's annual Mark Twain Awards. Washington DC, USA

Dennis Leary, George Carlin and John F Kennedy
Dennis Leary, George Carlin and John F Kennedy
Dennis Leary, George Carlin and John F Kennedy

The Comedy Store on Sunset Blvd pays tribute to the great comedian George Carlin after the announcement of his death

George Carlin Monday 23rd June 2008 The Comedy Store on Sunset Blvd pays tribute to the great comedian George Carlin after the announcement of his death Los Angeles, California

George Carlin
George Carlin
George Carlin
George Carlin

The Aristocrats Review


Excellent
In the dark weeks following 9/11, Comedy Central's management surprisingly decided not to cancel its taping of The Friar's Club Roast of Hugh Hefner. During the recording of the event, hundreds of comedians and urban luminaries found themselves shocked out of their post-terrorism pall by none other than Gilbert Gottfried, who delivered what the New York Times' Frank Rich, an attendee of the taping, called "the greatest dirty joke ever told."

Tracing its origins to vaudeville, this "comic's joke" is tantamount to a secret handshake among comedians and their friends. Although versions vary widely, it basically goes like this: A man seeking show biz representation walks into a talent agent's office and describes his family's act, which consists of various illegal and unspeakable activities including incest, bestiality, necrophilia, and an explosion of bodily fluids. After the man finishes, the appalled agent asks what this horrible act is called, to which the man responds, "The Aristocrats!"

Continue reading: The Aristocrats Review

Bill & Ted's Excellent Adventure Review


Excellent
The obvious inspirations for Wayne and Garth, Bill (Alex Winter) and Ted (Keanu Reeves) first hit history in this witty, winning tale of two modern-day So-Cal misfits who end up travelling through time. The impetus? A future society bases all of its culture on the music Bill and Ted's band, Wyld Stallyns (And notably the phrase, "Be excellent to each other") -- but all of that might never happen if the burnouts don't get their history report done.

Alas, it doesn't look good. Bill and Ted are walking mistakes as it is. They can't pronounce Socrates and believe Caeser was "a salad dressing dude." But their grasp of superlative adjectives like triumphant and gnarly is impressive indeed, so maybe there's hope.

Continue reading: Bill & Ted's Excellent Adventure Review

Bill & Ted's Bogus Journey Review


Excellent
Alex Winter, where art thou dude? At a time when even Pauley Shore can make a Weasel-free comeback, you are still wandering in the wilderness. For those who clocked out after Bill & Ted's Bogus Journey I have only one word, Freaked. Can you believe that Ortiz the Dog boy is now saving the world on a yearly basis? Bogus, dude.

Bill & Ted's Excellent Adventure was a tremendous hit in 1989 and a sequel was immediately in the works. Where the first film took our stoner heroes through time, Bill & Ted's Bogus Journey upped the ante and took them to hell. Literally, the original title of the film was Bill & Ted Go to Hell. The plot is awash in weird humor and outlandish gags as Bill and Ted attempt to defeat two evil robotic versions of themselves, avoid death, save history, and otherwise remain cool.

Continue reading: Bill & Ted's Bogus Journey Review

Scary Movie 3 Review


OK
There are lots of ways to churn out sequels, particularly comedies. You can speed along like a runaway train to capitalize on a surprise hit -- Miramax rushed Scary Movie 2 into theaters one year after the original's release -- or you can reset and go for broke. The latter approach seems to be the Scary Movie 3 motive, with new writers and veteran parody director David Zucker (Airplane!, The Naked Gun) joining the fray. For its efforts, Miramax gets a perfectly average movie, with fresh moments, lame retreads, and more opportunity for big box office.

Scary Movie 3 sticks with the program: mind-bogglingly dumb characters hustle their way through spoofs of the industry's most popular recent films. It's no mistake that the roasted movies -- in this case: Signs, The Ring, and 8 Mile -- all pull in huge money and attract a young audience.

Continue reading: Scary Movie 3 Review

Dogma Review


OK
That's it. Kevin Smith is going to Hell. Big Hell, with a capital H.

In Dogma, Smith's long-awaited and already vilified indictment of the Catholic church, the auteur has gone to great lengths to show us he can take on any establishment and gut it wide open. To wit:

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Jersey Girl Review


OK
Kevin Smith grows up. The writer/director from Red Bank, N.J., temporarily retires his trademark Silent Bob shtick for Jersey Girl, which sticks to a cute but overused plotline, occasionally branching out to include a few (but not enough) sarcastic observations addressing parenthood.

Though it wasn't pre-planned, Smith's film also puts the final nail in the "Bennifer" coffin then begins the resurrection process on Ben Affleck's floundering, Gigli-ravaged career. For the first time in a long while Affleck carries a decent picture, making a stronger connection to Smith's casual dialogue than he does with any of his co-stars.

Continue reading: Jersey Girl Review

Jay and Silent Bob Strike Back Review


Weak
It's time to say "goodbye," according to Kevin Smith, to his token recurring characters -- the C3PO and R2-D2 of the local Quick Stop -- Jay (Jason Mewes) and Silent Bob (Kevin Smith). Since their inception as two stoner losers hanging out in front of the local Quick Stop "smokin' blunts and kickin' asses" in Clerks, Jay and Silent Bob have received ever expanding roles in Smith's later features -- Mallrats, Chasing Amy, and Dogma. But when these two guys showed up in a cameo in Scream 3, that was the moment when they "jumped the shark" (aka lost their unique appeal and devolved into would-be Happy Meal figurines). I wouldn't be surprised if two 10-foot tall character replicants greeted all guests at Miramax's HQ.

If you looking for a plot in Jay and Silent Bob Strike Back, don't bother. Smith uses the safe convention of repetition by including certain key locations of his first three films and all of their main characters -- minus Dogma. By doing this, Smith creates a familiar universe for Jay and Silent Bob to venture through and trick the audience into remembering their old favorites and ignore the throwaway script.

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Jersey Girl Review


Terrible

Drowning in every workaholic- single- father- gets- his- priorities- straight cliché you could possibly imagine (and then some), "Jersey Girl" is so insultingly trite and treacly it actually features self-centered, single-dad widower Ben Affleck not only realizing (at the last moment) that his daughter's school talent show is more important than a job interview, but actually dashing back to the 'burbs from Manhattan to join her on stage for a song.

Granted, the duet -- which manages to be insipidly saccharine and hokey despite being a murderous number from "Sweeney Todd" -- is the performance that father and daughter had planned all along before his ego got in the way. But the very fact that it never even crosses Affleck's mind to ask about rescheduling his interview lays bare how blindly enamored writer-director Kevin Smith was with the hackneyed notion of this false dilemma.

For all the post-"Gigli" murmur about this being the another possible bomb co-starring former fiancés Ben Affleck and Jennifer Lopez, "Jersey Girl" is actually quite romantic, amusing and well-acted up to the point when Lopez, as Affleck's beloved wife, dies in childbirth, providing the timber-souled actor a brief moment in which to show unexpected depth as he collapses in a weeping heap in the hospital hallway.

Continue reading: Jersey Girl Review

Scary Movie 3 Review


OK

The "Scary Movie" horror spoofs must be some kind of mutant, alien movie franchise. There's just no other explanation for the fact that the sequels actually keep getting better. And unlike the hilarious but indefensibly scattershot second installment, "Scary Movie 3" even has a coherent combo-platter plot.

Serving up campy twists on The Ring's" killer-videotape plot and the alien invasion from Signs" -- with a little mock-"8 Mile" thrown in for flava -- the story catches up with wide-eyed dingbat heroine Anna Faris (who goofed on Neve Campbell's "Scream" character in the first two films) after she has become a blonde TV reporter (a la Naomi Watts in "The Ring") who discovers the creepy VHS cassette that curses anyone who watches it to die horribly in seven days. But when she tries to warn the world of its dangers, her producer puts his foot down: "No more paranoid on-air rants about the supernatural!"

Meanwhile Charlie Sheen -- returning to the kind of parody he showed such a deadpan knack for in 1991's "Hot Shots!" -- plays a farmer and former priest (shades of Mel Gibson in "Signs") whose cornfields have been flattened in a mysterious "crop circle" that from above reads "Attack Here!" with an arrow pointing to his house.

Continue reading: Scary Movie 3 Review

Dogma Review


OK

Thanks to all the is-it-or-isn't-it-blasphemy controversy surrounding "Dogma," writer-director Kevin Smith has added a tongue-in-cheek disclaimer to the opening of this renegade ribbing of the Catholic church that is so amusing ("...God has a sense of humor, just look at the platypus") it will have audiences in stitches even before the first line of dialogue.

Whether or not you'll think the movie stays this funny will depend on how sensitive you are about your position on the religious yardstick, your threshold for soapbox pontification and what it takes to gross you out.

Smith, the maverick Generation X satirist responsible for ragtag underground hits "Clerks" and "Chasing Amy," makes no bones about testing the limits of irreverence and good taste in this ironically snappy and smart-mouthed theological deliberation.

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George Carlin

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