George A Romero

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Diary Of The Dead Review


Excellent
Mere minutes into his latest exercise in politically-conscious cannibalism, an overtly-serious voice alerts us that this is not a movie by the inimitable George A. Romero. It is, in fact, a sort of video assemblage culled from footage shot by Jason Creed (Josh Close), a young film student living and working in Pennsylvania. This makeshift eulogy is spoken by Creed's main squeeze Debra (Michelle Morgan) who serves as editor of Creed's posthumous opus, ingeniously-titled The Death of Death.

After the initial frames turn an immigrant family into a bunch of slow-moving flesh-chewers taped by a local newsman, the perspective shifts directly to Creed's camera as he shoots the zombie rampage that was meant to be his senior thesis for his professor (Scott Wentworth), a world-class alcoholic. As his star (Philip Riccio) takes off for his mansion with the sound girl, Creed and his crew start hearing broadcasts over the internet and the radio about the dead coming back to life: the death of death indeed.

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signing copies of his dvd 'Creepshow'

George A Romero Monday 29th October 2007 signing copies of his dvd 'Creepshow' London, England

George A Romero
George A Romero
George A Romero
George A Romero
George A Romero

the American director at the dvd 'Creepshow' signing at HMV, Oxford Street

George A. Romero Monday 29th October 2007 the American director at the dvd 'Creepshow' signing at HMV, Oxford Street London, England

George A. Romero
George A. Romero
George A. Romero

Night of the Living Dead Review


Excellent
The shuffling zombie with one arm outstretched -- he got his start here on George Romero's groundbreaking horror flick of rampaging zombies and a citizenry that holes up in the hopes of keeping them at bay. The cause for this zombification is typically priceless, courtesy of the Cold War: Radiation from a fa2llen satellite.

Romero does great work with no money to spend -- though the film is quite repetitious and the mindless zombies move so slowly that any half-brained human ought to easily outrun and outmaneuver them. Nonetheless, many humans find themselves outwitted... and the film (along with the very similar Invasion of the Body Snatchers films) has inspired countless imitators and odes, including Assault on Precinct 13 and pretty much any other "We're trapped!" horror flick. Followed by two sequels (the first of which many regard as the best of the series).

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Land of the Dead Review


Good
George Romero inhabits a peculiar realm in American cinema. He is both a political provocateur, championing the cause of the common man, and the king of zombie gore, the lowbrow art of human disembowelment, decapitation, and so on.

Land of the Dead is Romero's fourth zombie picture, a sequel of sorts to his last "...of the Dead" picture, Day of the Dead. It all began, of course, with the infamous '60s shocker Night of the Living Dead - now a denizen of the public domain and released by every fly-by-night DVD company around - which combined social commentary and, at the time, shocking gore. It was a combo that inspired a whole genre, the zombie-athon, and countless imitators, very few of which are as inspired as any of Romero's. (The engaging and referential Shaun of the Dead comes closest.)

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Bruiser Review


Good
A revenge fantasy in the E.C. horror comics tradition, George A. Romero's Bruiser is about Henry Creedlow (Jason Flemyng, Snatch), a Joe Average company man whose anonymous working life has made him invisible to peers and loved ones. His wife has been using him for his upwardly mobile financial status while cheating behind his back. His co-worker and best buddy has been skimming the profits, secretly preventing Henry from earning his fair share. Worst of all is the boss, Miles Styles (Peter Stormare, Fargo), a loud, obnoxious boor who enjoys ritualistically humiliating everyone at board meetings -- a character so smirkingly piggish and cruel it's a wonder God hasn't struck him dead. Henry discovers that nice guys finish last, and when he wakes up one morning to discover his face has magically transformed into a featureless white mask, he uses the anonymity once used against him as a device for smooth, calculated vengeance against all who have done him wrong. It's The Invisible Man gone corporate.

Romero hasn't been able to get a feature film off the ground since 1993's The Dark Half, which is really too bad. He's one of the more distinctive filmmakers working within the horror genre, having made his start with the black-and-white classic Night of the Living Dead in 1968. That was a pioneer for modern horror as gruesome satire, followed up by the arguably superior Dawn of the Dead (where the zombie invasion was set against the backdrop of a shopping mall). Fans of Romero will be pleased to see him back to his old preoccupations. Bruiser could be viewed as an extension of the identity crisis in Martin, Romero's ambivalent portrait of a young man who may or may not be a vampire.

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Monkey Shines Review


Grim
Talk about having a monkey on your back. This is pretty hideous, standard horror fare, with a genetically-enhanced monkey caring for a quadrapelegic. This is about as bad as horror gets (and at 1:54 in length, it's as long as it gets, too), but it does feature the only known man-bites-monkey-to-death scene on film that I can remember.

Dawn Of The Dead (1978) Review


Good
Ten years after the original Night of the Living Dead, George Romero returned to his zombie plague in what is widely considered that rare sequel which is better than the original. He certainly had more money to spend -- the movie's in color, with pretty good production values, extreme gore, and zombies galore. The story, of course, remains the same, as our gang of mismatched heroes hole up in a shopping mall while zombies surround them, Romero's tongue-in-cheek ode to Americans behaving as consumerist cattle. The splatter effects are outstanding and fairly pioneering for 1978, but any sense of foreboding is outweighed by the movie's repetitive plot. Two hours is just way too long for a zombie movie, folks, no matter how much flesh gets eaten.

The Dark Half Review


OK
Genuinely scary though unmemorable Stephen King thriller features a pedantic writer tormented by his "dark half," who enjoys writing twisted horror stories. Recently out on DVD, and worth a look for Timothy Hutton's freaky portrayal of the two halves.
George A Romero

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