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Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Men Tell No Tales Trailer


Jack Sparrow finds himself in constant trouble with the law; not only is his name known from ocean to ocean, his face is now just as famous. With a reward of two hundred pounds Jack is being chased by bounty hunters once again. Not only are naval officers pursuing him, he also has a number of former rival captains hot on his heels too.

Captain Barbossa is now in control of the ship The Queen Anne's Revenge, after winning it from Captain Blackbeard and a long-time nemesis of Jack's called Captain Salazar who doesn't want to just kill Jack, he wants to kill every pirate on the sea in a bid to be once and for all to be total control over the oceans.

When Jack learns of Salazar's plan, the lovable rogue and Salazar go head to head in a race to retrieve a Trident that once belonged to the god of the oceans Poseidon. Whoever holds the trident controls the power of the sea and everything that lives in or sails on it.

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Gods Of Egypt Review

Good

With a massive scale and a digital cast of thousands, this ancient Egyptian romp tries to be both a new version of those 1950s Biblical toga epics and a generous dose of camp silliness. The result will be a guilty pleasure for some in the audience, especially those who enjoy watching grown men leap around in short skirts. The actors are sometimes lost in the overwhelming animation, and the casting of Westerners as North Africans is more than a little dubious. But the script is smarter than it looks, and director Alex Proyas is clearly in a playful mood.

The premise conflates the golden age of the Pharaohs with the ancient world of Egyptian gods. And things kick off when the bitter god Set (Gerard Butler) launches a reign of terror by killing his brother, blinding his nephew Horus (Nokolaj Coster-Waldau) and taking over the mortal world, enslaving all humans. Horus' greatest fan is the muscly slave Bek (Brenton Thwaites) who, encouraged by his glamorous girlfriend Zaya (Courtney Eaton), sneaks into Set's palace and steals one of Horus' eyes. He then strikes a deal to help Horus assume his rightful throne. But this means travelling into the sky to confront his grandfather Ra (Geoffrey Rush), then teaming up with sneering god of wisdom Thoth (Chadwick Boseman) and duplicitous Hathor (Yung) to take on Set.

All of this is so ridiculous that it's difficult to stop giggling. And that seems to be part of the idea, as Proyas merrily cranks up the snarky wit in every scene, especially as he indulges in a series of ludicrous set-pieces that feel like videogames populated by toy action figures. The digital effects continually engulf the characters, transforming the gods inexplicably into animal-headed metallic robots. But they also create some genuinely gorgeous moments of spectacle, with sprawling landscapes and whooshing action. Basically, the actors have little choice but to hang on for the ride along with the audience.

Continue reading: Gods Of Egypt Review

Angelina Jolie, Steve Martin & Angela Lansbury Earn Honorary Recognition From The Academy’s Governors Awards


Angelina Jolie Steve Martin Angela Lansbury Brad Pitt Tom Hanks Martin Short George Lucas Emma Thompson Geoffrey Rush

Angelina Jolie, Steve Martin and Angela Lansbury were honoured on Saturday, 16 November, night at the Academy’s Governors Awards, in a night where emotions ran high and the awards circuit got off to a start. Jolie was perhaps the biggest celebrity name on the awards sheet, but it was Martin and Lansbury who stole the show with their heartfelt gratitude towards being honoured by the Academy for a career in front of the camera.

Angelina Jolie
Angelina Jolie was honoured for her humanitarian work

Jolie received the first standing ovation of the night though, picking up the Jean Hersholt Humanitarian Award for her continued, dedicated service to aid work across the globe. Attending the event with her hubby Brad Pitt and their son Maddox, Jolie accepted the award from George Lucas after being toasted in a video presentation featuring clips from her in the movies and in refuge camps and care-giving scenarios found across the globe. Receiving thank you's from four stars of her upcoming Bosnian war film In the Land of Blood and Honey, Gena Rowlands then toasted the star before she took to the stage, asking, “How does she have the time to do all this? She acts and directs, she has a large family… and she has to keep that smile on Brad’s face.”

Continue reading: Angelina Jolie, Steve Martin & Angela Lansbury Earn Honorary Recognition From The Academy’s Governors Awards

Sophie Nelisse and Geoffrey Rush - Mill Valley Film Festival 2013 - Opening Night - San Francisco, United States - Thursday 3rd October 2013

Sophie Nelisse and Geoffrey Rush
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Sophie Nelisse and Mark Fishkin
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The Book Thief Trailer


Liesel Meminger is a 9-year-old girl who is forced to be separated from her family for her own safety. She goes to live with another German couple, Rosa and Hans Hubermann, who treat her as if she were their own. However, settling in to a new home is less than easy and she struggles desperately from disturbed sleep. In a bid to comfort her, Hans decides to stay by her bedside every night until she falls asleep. He discovers that she is in possession of a book, 'The Gravediggers Handbook', which it turns out was stolen and Liesel is unable to read it. Hans decides to help her further by teaching her to read, an ability that is enhanced further by the arrival of a Jewish runaway named Max, who the Hubermann's agree to hide from the vigilant Nazi officers.

'The Book Thief' is based on the 2006 World War II novel of the same name by Markus Zusak and has been adapted to screen by writer Michael Petroni ('The Chronicles of Narnia: The Voyage of the Dawn Treader', 'The Rite') and Primetime Emmy winning director Brian Percival ('The Ruby in the Smoke', 'The Old Curiosity Shop', 'A Boy Called Dad'). It is set for release in the UK on January 31st 2014.

Click here to read - The Book Thief Movie Review

Geoffrey Rush - Actor Geoffrey Rush Saturday 8th September 2012 standing outside a Soho hotel

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Geoffrey Rush and Manhattan Hotel Saturday 8th September 2012 texting on his cell phone as he sits outside his Manhattan hotel

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Geoffrey Rush and Manhattan Hotel
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Geoffrey Rush and Sydney Opera House Tuesday 31st January 2012 The 2012

Geoffrey Rush Friday 27th January 2012 2012 Australian Academy of Cinema and Television Arts Awards held at Soho House - Arrivals

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Geoffrey Rush Monday 12th September 2011 36th Annual Toronto International Film Festival - Celebrity Sightings Toronto, Canada

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Geoffrey Rush - Geoffrey Rush drinking and smoking at a table Toronto, Canada - 36th Annual Toronto International Film Festival - Celebrity Sightings Thursday 8th September 2011

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Guest and Geoffrey Rush Thursday 18th August 2011 The launch of the Australian Academy of Cinema and Television Arts (AACTA) Sydney, Australia

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Green Lantern Trailer


For millions of years, the universe has been watched over by a group of noble custodians, sworn to keep peace in the universe, these mighty beings are called The Green Lantern Corps. Hailing from all sides of the universe, each chosen keeper wears a ring that harnesses true willpower and allows them to gain super powers.

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Geoffrey Rush Tuesday 17th May 2011 The Australian premiere of 'Pirates of the Caribbean: On Stranger Tides' at Event Cinemas - Arrivals Sydney, Australia

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Geoffrey Rush, Interview


Interview with Geoffrey Rush for Pirates Of The Caribbean: On Stranger Tides 17th May 2011

Aussie Oscar-winner Geoffrey Rush is one of those rare actors who mixes higher-brow fare like The King's Speech with more raucous roles such as the rogue Captain Barbossa in the Pirates of the Caribbean movies.

Continue reading: Geoffrey Rush, Interview

Geoffrey Rush, Johnny Depp, Penelope Cruz and Rob Marshall Saturday 14th May 2011 Geoffrey Rush, Penelope Cruz, Johnny Depp and Rob Marshall 2011 Cannes International Film Festival - Day 4 - Pirates of the Caribbean: On Stranger Tides - Premiere Cannes, France

Geoffrey Rush, Johnny Depp, Penelope Cruz and Rob Marshall

Geoffrey Rush Saturday 14th May 2011 2011 Cannes International Film Festival - Day 4 - Pirates of the Caribbean: On Stranger Tides - Photocall Cannes, France

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Geoffrey Rush Saturday 14th May 2011 2011 Cannes International Film Festival - Day 4 - Pirates of the Caribbean: On Stranger Tides - Photocall Arrivals Cannes, France

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Geoffrey Rush Thursday 12th May 2011 'Pirates of the Caribbean: On Stranger Tides' UK film premiere - Afterparty held at Massimo Restaurant London, England

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Geoffrey Rush Thursday 12th May 2011 'Pirates of the Caribbean: On Stranger Tides' UK film premiere held at the Westfield Shopping Centre - Arrivals. London, England

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Geoffrey Rush - Thursday 12th May 2011 at ITV Studios London, England

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The King's Speech Review


Extraordinary

Momentous historical events add a remarkable kick to this fascinating personal drama, which is based on journal entries and firsthand accounts. besides being hugely entertaining, the film also gives Colin Firth yet another meaty role to dive into.

In 1925, Bertie (Firth), the Duke of York, is paralysed with fear when required to speak in public. After unsuccessful treatment for his stammer, his wife Elizabeth (Bonham Carter) locates unorthodox speech therapist Lionel Logue (Rush), an Australian who insists on familiarity even with the royals. But as Bertie begins to make progress, his life takes a dramatic turn when his brother Edward VIII (Pearce) abdicates the throne, leaving Bertie in place as George VI just as war breaks out with Germany. Now the nation really needs to hear his voice.

The sharp, often very witty script has the ring of truth to it, refusing to overplay big events or to create some miracle cinematic cure that sees Bertie rising to inspiring orator status. Even though it's still extremely crowd-pleasing, it's a much more complex story centring on the man behind the stutter, exploring the intimate, difficult journey Bertie must have taken before he was so suddenly thrust into the limelight.

As with last year's A Single Man, Firth invests the role with layered subtext that gives Bertie a fully fledged inner life far beyond the astute screenplay.
It's a beautiful performance that tells us as much with a quiet sigh as it does with a razor-sharp line of dialog. His banter with the excellent Rush is also full of substance, while Bonham Carter not only uncannily captures the Queen Mother's physical presence but also the strength of the woman who, together with her husband, would so bravely lead Britain through the Blitz.

Visually, the film transcends the usual costume-drama approach, with expert direction from Hooper that beautifully plays with perspectives and textures.
Also notable is the way the camera quietly captures expansive backdrops that continually remind us (and Bertie) that there's a whole nation out there waiting for his next word. And along the way, we strongly identify with Bertie, which makes his journey takes both stirring and thrillingly inspiring.

Pirates Of The Caribbean: On Stranger Tides Trailer


The trailer for the fourth instalment from The Pirates Of The Caribbean franchise has arrived! Captain Jack Sparrow once again takes to the high seas in an adventure that's sure to be immensely entertaining. When a beautiful yet deadly woman from Jack's past appears once again, he's unsure of her intentions but once she forces him to join her on the ruthless Blackbeard's ship called Queen Anne's Revenge asking to find the infamous fountain of youth, he knows there's sure to be plenty of danger ahead. Not only that but the captain also finds himself in the much colder climates than he's used to when his quest takes him to London.

Continue: Pirates Of The Caribbean: On Stranger Tides Trailer

Legend Of The Guardians: The Owls Of Ga'Hoole Review


Excellent
Spectacular animation and a terrific voice cast go a long way to making this soaring adventure feel much more original than it is. Despite heavy echoes of other movies, it's thoroughly engaging and often genuinely thrilling.

Soren (voiced by Sturgess) is an idealistic owlet who dreams of one day meeting his heroes, the mythical Guardians of Ga'Hoole. Then he and his brother Kludd (Kwanten) are kidnapped by the evil Pure Ones, led by Queen Nyra (Mirren) and Metalbeak (Edgerton), as slaves for their nefarious plan. In their wasteland hideout, Soren meets the feisty dwarf owl Gylfie (Barclay), and they flee to Ga'Hoole for help. There, Soren meets the quirky Ezylryb (Rush), who helps teach him to fly properly and punctures some of his heroic ideals before they head into battle.

Continue reading: Legend Of The Guardians: The Owls Of Ga'Hoole Review

Dame Helen Mirren And Russell Brand Take On The Tempest


Helen Mirren Beatles Djimon Hounsou Geoffrey Rush Jeremy Irons Julie Taymor Russell Brand

Dame Helen Mirren and Russell Brand are among the cast members of an experimental upcoming film of Shakespeare's The Tempest.

According to the Hollywood Reporter, Julie Taymor's take on the Bard sees Mirren as Prospera, a female version of Prospero, the exiled duke of the original play.

Brand is to play Trinculo, a jester, while Jeremy Irons, Djimon Hounsou and Ben Whishaw have also been confirmed for the Icon film.

In Shakespeare's original text, Prospero and his daughter Miranda (Felicity Jones) are exiled to a distant island inhabited only by deformed slave Caliban (Hounsou) and Ariel, a spirit (Whishaw).

Having learnt to control the island with magic, Prospero seizes the chance to wreak revenge on her usurpers by raising a storm which leaves them shipwrecked, sparking a romance between Miranda and the son of Prospero's greatest rival Alonso, the King of Naples (Irons).

Alfred Molina is also on board, playing the drunken butler Stephano while Oscar-winner Geoffrey Rush is in negotiations to play Gonzalo, a royal adviser and former alley of Prospero's.

Director Taymor's only significant change to the text, as of yet, seems to be the feminising of Prospero's character.

Likely to begin shooting in November, The Tempest will be the Oscar-nominated helmer's first film since 2007's Beatles musical Across the Universe.

Continue reading: Dame Helen Mirren And Russell Brand Take On The Tempest

Candy Review


Good
It's nice, in a way, to see a film about drug addicts in which, for a time at least, the addicts really seem to be enjoying themselves. So it is for the first segment of Neil Armfield's Candy, appropriately labeled, "Heaven" (later sections take on names of a more fallen nature). The stars in the film's fizzy firmament, Dan and Candy, are played by Heath Ledger and Abbie Cornish as just a pair of overgrown kids who can't ever stop with the games, and given their bright and cheery looks -- not to mention an extremely helpful sugar daddy -- why would they want to? As Dan ruefully says in the latter, morose stretches of downward junkie mobility, "We lived on sunlight and candy bars." Who wouldn't want that?When we first join them, Dan and Candy are living the easy life, lounging around their shabby chic apartment and mooning over each other in a blessed-out stupor. They seem to have enough money to do little else, and when they're hard up, there's always the improbably accommodating sugar daddy Casper (a campy but enjoyable Geoffrey Rush), who's always good for a spot of cash or dope. He's a ne'er-do-well and (very) occasional poet of lowly charms who has taken up with the younger Candy, whose bourgeois parents make little secret of their disapproval of the union. The fiction they've chosen to believe is that Dan has corrupted their perfect little girl, even though the film's first scene has her begging a reluctant Dan to show her how to shoot up heroin instead of just sniffing it. It's a sign of the film's intelligence that even though we're never quite meant to root for one or the other of this headstrong pair, it's clear that there's a ugly subcurrent to Candy's perfume-counter blonde breeziness.Things get worse, as they do, and the relationship begins to fray. Increasingly hard up for money, the couple resorts more and more to petty thievery before finally going down the old route of prostitution. One particularly wounding scene has Candy selling herself on a whim to a shop owner for 50 bucks while Dan waits in the car. When she comes back afterwards, their roles have almost instantaneously changed, Candy's sunny disposition severely darkened, while Dan's mellow vibe is transformed into sheer powerlessness, unable to say anything but a weak, "I'm sorry." Ledger's naked vulnerability provides much of what works in the darker segments of the film, proving once again that there's little this sometimes underrated actor isn't capable of.Candy is an Aussie film through and through, starring not just the two eminence graces of the continent's film industry -- Ledger and Rush -- but also one of its newest stars, Cornish, who was such a welcome revelation in Somersault. There's also a certain lack of fuss and appreciation of the natural world that seems to come so strangely easily to Aussie filmmakers. Director Armfield (who has an extensive theater background) coaxes excellent performances from his performers, almost making up for the thinness of the material -- adapted from a novel by Luke Davies. Even if, in the end, Candy has not much new to say about its disaffected junkie lovebirds, it at least understands what it is that puts people like them into this situation. Far too often in film, we see only the aftereffects of addiction, the wasted zombies trying to cop just one more time, and never the hale and hearty beings they once were.I want candy.

Munich Review


Excellent
It's been a long, tough road watching Steven Spielberg grow up. Too often, the great Hollywood money machine seemed to flip self-consciously back and forth between his serious work (Schindler's List) and the popcorn flicks (The Lost World, The Terminal). For better or for worse, though, 2005 will be remembered as the year when Spielberg finally and resoundingly merged these twin desires into unified works of serious entertainment, first his stunning War of the Worlds, and now Munich, a less complete piece of work, perhaps, but the most ambitious of Spielberg's career and truly something to behold.

What makes Munich even more ambitious than films like List or even Empire of the Sun is that it's not as recognizable a film as those classically-structured epics. This film is part spy thriller and part meditation on violence but not completely either. The result comes out as somewhat scrambled by the end, with the pieces of about a half-dozen lesser movies mixed around inside, but there's rarely a moment when it's not grabbing you by the collar and demanding your undivided attention. We should have more of this kind of thing.

Continue reading: Munich Review

Intolerable Cruelty Review


Good
How can you not love the Coen brothers? The sibling creators of some of cinema's most classic films -- Fargo, Blood Simple, O Brother, Where Art Thou? -- are back at it, this time with their strangest production yet.

Oh, I don't mean strange as in Raising Arizona strange. I mean strange in that it's dearthly lacking the sophisticated humor we've come to expect from the duo. Strange in that it's so Hollywood-conventional as to make its existence puzzling at best, unnecessary at worst.

Continue reading: Intolerable Cruelty Review

Les Misérables Review


Very Good
Believe it or not, this is the nineteenth adaptation of Victor Hugo's classic novel--and likely the last to star Claire Danes. I've never read it and I've bever seen the play, but it's a good enough flick, I suppose. The tale of Jean Valjean, a paroled criminal who tries to make a new life for himself, and Javert, the obsessed inspector who's always one step behind him, is a good one. But it flags in the third act, only to revive itself for a killer ending.

Continue reading: Les Misérables Review

Shine Review


Excellent
In Hollywood, you just can't make a movie like Shine. Put simply, it is just not allowed.

This is our loss and Australia's gain, because Shine comes off as one of the upper-echelon films of the year, an ambitious and unflinching look at that country's David Helfgott, a prodigy of a pianist driven insane by his father, only to emerge again after 20 years of institutionalization.

Continue reading: Shine Review

Frida Review


Very Good
After withstanding a decade of development, a race between two competing projects, and the mural-sized egos of Jennifer Lopez and Madonna, a film biography of Frida Kahlo has finally made it to the screen. Who would have guessed that a film about a mustachioed, Mexican woman with a peg leg and an overweight, Communist husband would generate so much interest? Nevertheless Frida's producers, including star Salma Hayek, somehow prevented this unique story from becoming a disastrous vanity project and ended up with an unlikely Hollywood film.

Frida Kahlo's (Salma Hayek) first meeting with Diego Rivera (Alfred Molina) and her injury in a horrible bus accident set in motion the two major forces behind Frida. Bedridden for months in a full-body cast, the young Frida keeps herself busy--and learns to express her internal passions and pain--through drawing and painting. Falling in with the womanizing Rivera and his bohemian cadre of artists and revolutionaries deepens Frida's commitment to her painting and life with the loyal but philandering muralist. Their art carries them from Mexico to New York and back in the company of such impressive historical figures as David Alfaro Siqueiros (Antonio Banderas), Nelson Rockefeller (Ed Norton), and Leon Trotsky (Geoffery Rush).

Continue reading: Frida Review

Children Of The Revolution Review


Good
A true oddity, in keeping with Australian cinema. What with F. Murray Abraham as Stalin (yes, the Stalin), who fathers a lovechild in the 1950s with a visiting Australian radical played by Judy Davis, how can you expect anything but weirdness? With early-career appearances by Rachel Griffiths and Geoffrey Rush, Children of the Revolution is remarkable for its sheer ballsiness, but the story is likely a bit too circuitous, self-referential, and unbelievable for most tastes. Ostensibly based on a true story, the sarcasm eventually gets so thick you find you need a mint.

Elizabeth Review


Good
Seeing Elizabeth on the day of the impeachment of President Clinton was a bit strange, but it did put things in perspective.

450 years ago, no one would've thought a thing about a little intern boinking. Today, that's obviously big news, and it should have made the sexual, political, and religious escapades of Elizabeth all the more thrilling.

Continue reading: Elizabeth Review

Finding Nemo Review


Extraordinary
The Pixar logo - which is the company's name with a desk lamp in place of the "I" - has become the cinematic equivalent of a "Prime" stamp on a side of beef. Once we see it, we know we're in for breathtaking animation, clever scripts, and wholesome family entertainment. The cynic in me waits for the geniuses responsible for the Toy Story features, A Bug's Life, and Monsters, Inc. to slip up and release a flop. Looks like I'll be waiting a few more years.

The latest Pixar pearl, Finding Nemo, ventures under the sea, where single dad Marlin (voice of Albert Brooks) overprotects his only son, Nemo (voice of Alexander Gould). One day, Nemo wades into uncharted waters on a dare, only to be snatched up by a scuba diver and placed in the tank of an Australian dentist. For the remainder of the film, Marlin and a forgetful fish named Dory (voice of Ellen DeGeneres) scour the ocean floor in an effort to bring Nemo home, a task that's easier said than done.

Continue reading: Finding Nemo Review

Pirates Of The Caribbean: The Curse Of The Black Pearl Review


Very Good
Any sailor worth his salt knows that "pirate" is a curse word you don't dare utter on the high seas. You just might summon the scavengers' fearful wrath.

Actually, "pirate" wasn't a word you wanted to mention in Hollywood, either. Calling the genre troublesome is an understatement, as directors who attempted big-budget pirate adventures were plagued with disastrous shoots, and the films received lukewarm response at the box office. Everything from Roman Polanski's Pirates to Renny Harlin's Cutthroat Island immediately sank to the depths of Davy Jones's locker.

Continue reading: Pirates Of The Caribbean: The Curse Of The Black Pearl Review

The House On Haunted Hill (1999) Review


Terrible
Every so often, most recently with Scream, a film will briefly try to make the horror genre something it's not --- like creative, entertaining, cool, or self-aware. But The House on Haunted Hill is not one of those films.

Instead, it's pretty much a copy of all the other haunted-house horror movies that have run briefly in theaters over the years (and then run on cable channels indefinitely, giving teenagers something to stare at for a minute or two before leaving the house or switching channels). I understand that the beast of cable programming must be fed, but I still don't understand why directors are still making new movies like this, given the thousands that have already been made. Why don't the cable channels just run old ones from the late 1980s that nobody remembers?

Continue reading: The House On Haunted Hill (1999) Review

Mystery Men Review


Very Good
"Hey now, you're an all-star, get your game on, go play..." then sit back and watch America's newest superheroes screw up, in this summer's new comedy, Mystery Men. In this Tim Burtonesque film by Kinka Usher, a ragtag band of superheroes set out to rescue Captain Amazing (a Superman comparable played by Greg Kinear) from the evil clutches of the criminal mastermind, Cassanova Frankenstein (Geoffrey Rush).

Mystery Men is one of the funniest films I've seen all year. It combines the hilarious randomness of films like Austin Powers: The Spy Who Shagged Me, with a satirical twist that today's audiences are sure to appreciate. Now don't get me wrong, Mystery Men is no masterpiece, but it made me laugh (a lot) and that's what the film is about. Mystery Men scores high in all areas. It has an entirely kooky and original plot fueled by crack up dialogue, mesmerizing scenery, (which is reminiscent of the Batman movies) and an awesome cast.

Continue reading: Mystery Men Review

Quills Review


Excellent
Come frolic with the Marquis de Sade deep in the bowels of the Charenton Asylum, where he'll tickle your fancy with lavish descriptions of bestiality, flatulence and the dimples of a fat mademoiselle's bottom.

As portrayed in Quills, based on the Obie Award-winning play by Doug Wright, the Marquis is an earthy, dirty, jolly old soul with the unquenchable desire to write his perverse dreams on paper. He's the unflinching id in the face of mediocrity and tolerance, the middle finger held like a candle to the powerful hypocrites, and the loud fart in the house of God, an affront to restrictive dogma.

Continue reading: Quills Review

Shakespeare In Love Review


Extraordinary
Easily the best comedy of the year - and the best film of the year to star Joseph Fiennes and feature Queen Elizabeth as a major character - Shakespeare in Love gets a hands-down recommendation for all filmgoers.

The clever premise follows one William Shakespeare (Fiennes), stuck with writer's block while trying to pen "Romeo and Ethel, the Pirate's Daughter" and unable to get his own love life going to boot.

Continue reading: Shakespeare In Love Review

The Life And Death Of Peter Sellers Review


Very Good
Discussion topic: Which of the following people can accurately be described as "comic geniuses"? Woody Allen. Adam Sandler. Groucho Marx. Gilda Radner.

You're unlikely to get consensus on such a phrase, except for one: Peter Sellers. Everybody knows he was a genius, right?

Continue reading: The Life And Death Of Peter Sellers Review

Lantana Review


Good
Men have feelings too. Men cry, despite the stigma attached to their gender, or at least they want to more than they let on. It's all societal conditioning. That's the pretentious premise of this never-ending, two-hour look at couple dysfunction.

With a highly acclaimed cast that includes Anthony LaPaglia, Barbara Hershey, and Geoffrey Rush you would hope this idea would provide great material for such illustrious actors to sink their teeth into. Unfortunately, having been adapted for the screen from a play, by the playwright himself, much of the emotional impact is lost in overwhelmingly dramatic dialogue.

Continue reading: Lantana Review

Frida Review


Good

Most movies about the lives of famous artists never provide a true sense of what drove the person's creativity. Even in a strongly acted, strongly directed biopic like 2000's "Pollock," for example, the closest it came to explaining why heavily splattered canvases were a breakthrough in modern art was when the painter's wife cryptically proclaimed, "You've done it, Pollock! You've cracked it wide open!"

But in "Frida," a transporting cinematic experience about the life and work of Mexican surrealist Frida Kahlo, director Julie Taymor captures the very essence of Kahlo's creative process through a wondrously rich, freeform visual language that fuses the events of her life with the imagery in her paintings so vividly that the artist's work may take on a striking new significance for anyone who sees the film.

Passionately played by Salma Hayek, who has been personally shepherding this project for seven years, Kahlo comes to life in this picture as a complicated, dynamic, proud and intelligent woman whose frequent hardships informed her art. Opening when she was a plucky high school girl (36-year-old Hayek passes for 16 with remarkable ease), Frida is established as a young woman with a spicy individuality even before the 1925 bus wreck that irreversibly altered her life.

Continue reading: Frida Review

Ned Kelly Review


Weak

Plied with fiction and short on depth, the new biopic of legendary Australian outlaw Ned Kelly plays like "Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid" without the excitement, charm and humor.

Bearded and brooding but otherwise uncharismatic, Heath Ledger stars as the folk-hero bushranger (Aussie for "cowboy"), who according to this film was an upstanding citizen of the Outback frontier until contemptible, crooked, downright sinister lawmen drove him to a life of crime by picking on his family.

They jailed his ma, molested his teenage sister, and falsely accused him and his brothers of horse rustling. They "started a war" against us, Kelly says in voice-over. "So I killed their coppers. I robbed their banks."

Continue reading: Ned Kelly Review

Lantana Review


Good

Marital stress hangs like an albatross around the necks of all the primary characters in "Lantana," an viscous Australian ensemble piece that begins as an intricate, intimate web of rocky relationships and evolves into a tangled, disconcerting mystery.

Two floundering couples, connected through six-degrees-of-separation periphery, are at the center of the story. Anthony LaPaglia is Leon Zat, a police inspector who takes out his many frustrations on suspects and in bed with Jane (Rachael Blake), an almost-divorcee from the salsa dance class his wife drags him to every week. His marriage to brittle Sonja (Kerry Armstrong) has grown tepid and uncommunicative -- a fact that she regularly bemoans to her shrink, Valerie Sommers (Barbara Hershey).

Valerie is a woman who has had a hard time maintaining her professional detachment since her young daughter was murdered two years before. Her marriage to John (Geoffrey Rush), a prickly law school dean, has grown so numb since the loss of their child that they speak to each other -- even about sex -- like uneasy co-workers. And the fact that John deals with his sorrow in quietly tearful visits to the murder site while Valerie has chosen to grieve publicly, publishing a book about the killing, hasn't helped heal their rift.

Continue reading: Lantana Review

Pirates Of The Caribbean: The Curse Of The Black Pearl Review


Very Good

The very idea of a movie based on a Disneyland ride -- let alone such a movie produced by Jerry "Kaboom" Bruckheimer, whose standards of quality extend only to the explosions that substituted for plot in 15 years of imbecilic summer blockbusters -- had me dreading "Pirates of the Caribbean: The Curse of the Black Pearl" since it was first announced almost two years ago.

But I'm now here to eat every bad word I said in anticipation of this matinee marvel. Exhilarating from beginning to end, vivid with atmosphere, cleverly cliché-mocking, and blessed with two top-notch, over-the-top performances by Johnny Depp and Geoffrey Rush (I should have trusted these two intrepid actors), it may well be one of the most enjoyable pirate escapades of all time.

Festooned in a three-point hat over gypsy hair, a billowy shirt, kohl-blackened eyes and gold-capped teeth that he thrusts forward as he speaks, Depp stars as Capt. Jack Sparrow, a dirty, flirty, disarmingly dishonest swashbuckler of subtly dubious sexuality (a covert pirate flick custom since the silent era) who sails into a 17th century Caribbean colonial port atop the mast of a rapidly sinking sailboat.

Continue reading: Pirates Of The Caribbean: The Curse Of The Black Pearl Review

Geoffrey Rush

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Geoffrey Rush Movies

Final Portrait Movie Review

Final Portrait Movie Review

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Pirates Of The Caribbean 5: Dead Men Tell No Tales (Salazar's Revenge) Featurette and Trailer

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It seems Captain Jack Sparrow has been sailing the seas as a pirate for many,...

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Forget Davy Jones' Locker and the Fountain of Youth, Captain Jack Sparrow is on an...

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Jack Sparrow finds himself in constant trouble with the law; not only is his name...

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For millions of years, the universe has been watched over by a group of noble...

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Captain Jack Sparrow is back for another high seas romp and, despite the long running...

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Momentous historical events add a remarkable kick to this fascinating personal drama, which is based...

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